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Index 



1982 



National Park System and Related Areas 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

HAY 80 «83 

CIBRArtita 
OEPOSITCfty 



Index 



National Park System 
and Related Areas 
as of June 1 , 1 982 



Contents 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



MAY SO 1983 

LIBRAhiu> 
OEPOSITORy 



National Park System 



Background 5 

Nomenclature of Park System Areas 6 

Designation of Wilderness Areas 8 

Parks in the Nation's Capital 9 

Large Additions in Alaska 9 

Administration 10 

Statistical Summary 10 

Descriptive Listing of National Park System Areas 

by State 12 



Related Areas 



Affiliated Areas 65 

Wild and Scenic Rivers System 

National Trail System 78 



70 



Alphabetical Listing 



National Park System and Related Areas 82 



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National Park System 













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Daniel Chester French's colossal marble statue of Abraham 
Lincoln commands the east entrance to the Lincoln Memorial in 
Washington, D.C. 



National Park System 

The National Park System of the United States, now in 
the early years of its second century, comprises nearly 
333 areas covering some 79 million acres in 49 States, 
the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, Saipan, and 
the Virgin Islands. These areas are of such national 
significance as to justify special recognition and protec- 
tion in accordance with various acts of Congress. 

By Act of March 1 , 1 872, Congress established Yellow- 
stone National Park in the Territories of Montana and 
Wyoming "as a public park or pleasuring ground for the 
benefit and enjoyment of the people" and placed it 
"under exclusive control of the Secretary of the Interior." 
The founding of Yellowstone National Park began a 
worldwide national park movement. Today more than 
1 00 nations contain some 1 ,200 national parks or equiva- 
lent preserves. 

In the years following the establishment of Yellow- 
stone, the United States authorized additional national 
parks and monuments, most of them carved from the 
Federal lands of the West. These, also, were adminis- 
tered by the Department of the Interior, while other 
monuments and natural and historical areas were admin- 
istered as separate units by the War Department and the 
Forest Service of the Department of Agriculture. No 
single agency provided unified management of the varied 
Federal parklands. 

In an Act signed on August 25, 1916, Congress estab- 
lished in the Department of the Interior the National Park 
Service to provide cohesive administration of such areas 
under the Department's jurisdiction. The Act says: The 
service thus established shall promote and regulate the 
use of the Federal areas known as national parks, 
monuments and reservations . . . by such means and 
measures as conform to the fundamental purpose of the 
said parks, monuments and reservations, which purpose 
is to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic 
objects and the wild life therein and to provide for the 
enjoyment of the same in such manner and by such 
means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment 
of future generations. 

An Executive Order in 1933 transferred 63 national 
monuments and military sites from the Forest Service 
and the War Department to the National Park Service. 
This action was a major step in the development of 
today's truly national system of parks— a system that 
includes areas of historical as well as scenic and scientif- 
ic importance. 

Congress declared in the General Authorities Act of 
1970 "that the National Park System, which began with 



the establishment of Yellowstone National Park in 1872, 
has since grown to include superlative natural, historic, 
and recreation areas in every region . . . and that it is the 
purpose of this Act to include all such areas in the 

System " 

Additions to the National Park System are now gener- 
ally made through acts of Congress, and national parks 
can be created only through such acts. But the President 
has authority, under the Antiquities Act of 1906, to 
proclaim national monuments on lands already under 
Federal jurisdiction. The Secretary of the Interior is usual- 
ly asked by Congress for his recommendations on pro- 
posed additions to the System. The Secretary is 
counseled by the National Park System Advisory Board, 
composed of private citizens, which advises him on 
possible additions to the System and policies for its 
management. 



Nomenclature of Park Service Areas 

The diversity of the parks is reflected in the variety of 
titles given to them. These include such designations as 
national park, national preserve, national monument, na- 
tional memorial, national historic site, national seashore, 
and national battlefield park. 

Although some titles are self-explanatory, others have 
been used in many different ways. For example, the title 
"national monument" has been given to great natural 
reservations, historic military fortifications, prehistoric ru- 
ins, fossil sites, and to the Statue of Liberty. 

In recent years, Congress and the National Park Serv- 
ice have attempted, with some success, to simplify the 
nomenclature and to establish basic criteria for use of the 
different official titles. Brief definitions of the most com- 
mon titles follow. 

Areas added to the National Park System for their 
natural values are expanses or features of land or water 
of great scenic and scientific quality and are usually 
designated as national parks, monuments, preserves, 
seashores, lakeshores, or riverways. Such areas contain, 
one or more distinctive attributes such as forest, grass- 
land, tundra, desert, estuary, or river systems; they may 
contain "windows" on the past for a view of geological 
history, imposing landforms such as mountains, mesas, 
thermal areas, and caverns, and they may be habitats of 
abundant or rare wildlife and plantlife. 

Generally, a national park covers a large area. It 
contains a variety of resources and encompasses suffi- 
cient land or water to ensure adequate protection of the 
resources. 



A national monument is intended to preserve at least 
one nationally significant resource. It is usually smaller 
than a national park and lacks its diversity of attractions. 

In 1974, Big Cypress and Big Thicket were authorized 
as the first national preserves. This category is estab- 
lished primarily for the protection of certain resources. 
Activities such as hunting and fishing or the extraction of 
minerals and fuels may be permitted if they do not 
jeopardize the natural values. 

Preserving shoreline areas and off-shore islands, the 
national lakeshores and national seashores focus on 
the preservation of natural values while at the same time 
providing water-oriented recreation. Although national 
lakeshores can be established on any natural freshwater 
lake, the existing four are all located on the Great Lakes. 
The national seashores are on the Atlantic, Gulf, and 
Pacific coasts. 

National rivers and wild and scenic riverways pre- 
serve ribbons of land bordering on free-flowing streams 
which have not been dammed, channelized, or otherwise 
altered by man. Besides preserving rivers in their natural 
state, these areas provide opportunities for outdoor activ- 
ities such as hiking, canoeing, and hunting. 

Although best known for its great scenic parks, more 
than half the areas of the National Park System preserve 
places and commemorate persons, events, and activities 
important in the Nation's history. These range from 
archeological sites associated with prehistoric Indian 
civilizations to sites related to the lives of modern Ameri- 
cans. Historical areas are customarily preserved or re- 
stored to reflect their appearance during the period of 
their greatest historical significance. 

In recent years, national historic site has been the 
title most commonly applied by Congress in authorizing 
the addition of such areas to the National Park System. A 
wide variety of titles— national military park, national 
battlefield park, national battlefield site, and national 
battlefield— has been used for areas associated with 
American military history. But other areas such as na- 
tional monuments and national historical parks may 
include features associated with military history. National 
historical parks are commonly areas of greater physical 
extent and complexity than national historic sites. 

The title national memorial is most often used for 
areas that are primarily commemorative. But they need 
not be sites or structures historically associated with their 
subjects. For example, the home of Abraham Lincoln in 
Springfield, III., is a national historic site, but the Lincoln 
Memorial in the District of Columbia is a national memorial. 

Several areas administered by National Capital Region 
whose titles do not include the words national memorial 



are nevertheless classified as memorials. These are 
John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Lincoln 
Memorial, Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on 
the Potomac, Theodore Roosevelt Island, Thomas Jef- 
ferson Memorial, and the Washington Monument— all in 
the District of Columbia. 

Originally, national recreation areas in the Park Sys- 
tem were units surrounding reservoirs impounded by 
dams built by other Federal agencies. The National Park 
Service manages many of these areas under cooperative 
agreements. The concept of recreational areas has 
grown to encompass other lands and waters set aside for 
recreational use by acts of Congress and now includes 
major areas in urban centers. There are also national 
recreation areas outside the National Park System that 
are administered by the Forest Service, U.S. Department 
of Agriculture. 

National parkways encompass ribbons of land flank- 
ing roadways and offer an opportunity for leisurely driving 
through areas of scenic interest. They are not designed 
for high speed point-to-point travel. Besides the areas set 
aside as parkways, other units of the National Park 
System include parkways within their boundaries. 

Two areas of the National Park System have been set 
aside primarily as sites for the performing arts. These 
are Wolf Trap Farm Park for the Performing Arts, Va., 
America's first such national park, and the John F. 
Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, D.C. Two histori- 
cal areas, Ford's Theatre National Historic Site, D.C, and 
Chamizal National Memorial, Tex., also provide facilities 
for the performing arts. 



Designation of Wilderness Areas 

In the Wilderness Act of 1964, Congress directed three 
Federal agencies, including the National Park Service, to 
study certain lands within their jurisdiction to determine 
the suitability of these lands for inclusion in the National 
Wilderness Preservation System. 

By subsequent legislation, Congress has designated 
wilderness areas in many units of the National Park 
System. This designation (noted in this booklet in the 
listing by States) does not remove wilderness lands from 
the parks. But it does ensure that they will be managed to 
retain their "primeval character and influence, without 
permanent improvements or human habitation. . . ." 

The Act provides, generally that "there shall be no 
commercial enterprise and no permanent road within any 
wilderness area . . . and (except for emergency uses) no 
temporary road, no use of motor vehicles, motorized 



equipment or motorboats, no landing of aircraft, no other 
form of mechanical transport, and no structure or installa- 
tion." Wilderness areas are open to hiking and, in some 
cases, horseback riding, primitive camping, and similar 
pursuits. 



Parks in the Nation's Capital 

As the Nation's Capital, Washington has a unique park 
system. Most of the public parks are administered by the 
Federal Government through National Capital Region of 
the National Park Service. 

National Capital Region has inherited duties originally 
assigned to three Federal Commissioners appointed by 
President Washington in 1790. The city's parks were 
administered by a variety of Federal agencies until this 
responsibility was assigned to the National Park Service 
under the Reorganization Act of 1933. Most parklands in 
the city are included in the Federal holdings, although the 
District of Columbia also operates parks, playgrounds, 
and recreational facilities. 

National Capital Region also administers several Na- 
tional Park System units in Maryland, Virginia, and West 
Virginia, which are shown in this booklet in the listing by 
States. 



Large Additions in Alaska 

The acreage of the National Park System has been 
more than doubled during the past few years because of 
one factor— the huge additions made in Alaska. On June 
30, 1977, the size of the Park System was approximately 
31.3 million acres. On December 1, 1978, President 
Jimmy Carter exercised his authority under the Antiqui- 
ties Act of 1906 to proclaim as units of the National Park 
System 11 new national monuments in Alaska and to 
make substantial additions to two existing monuments. 
The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, 
which became law on December 2, 1980, altered bound- 
aries of those units and redesignated most of them as 
national parks and national preserves. Following that 
enactment, the acreage of the National Park System 
stood at approximately 79 million, with about 54.4 million 
of that in Alaska. 



Administration 

The National Park Service administers the System through ten Regional Offices. The addresses of 
these offices and their areas of responsibility are: 



North Atlantic Regional Office 

15 State St. 
Boston, MA 02109 
(Maine, New Hampshire, Ver- 
mont, Massachusetts, Rhode 
Island, Connecticut, New York, 
New Jersey) 

Mid-Atlantic Regional Office 

143 South Third St. 
Philadelphia, PA 19106 
(Pennsylvania, Maryland, 
West Virginia, Delaware, Vir- 
ginia, excluding parks as- 
signed to National Capital 
Region) 

National Capital Regional 
Office 

1100 Ohio Dr., SW 
Washington, DC 20242 
(District of Columbia, some 
units in Maryland, Virginia, 
West Virginia) 



Southeast Regional Office 

Richard B. Russell Federal 
Bldg. & U.S. Courthouse 
75 Spring St., SW 
Atlanta, GA 30303 
(Kentucky, Tennessee, North 
Carolina, South Carolina, Mis- 
sissippi, Alabama, Georgia, 
Florida, Puerto Rico, Virgin 
Islands) 

Midwest Regional Office 

1 709 Jackson St. 
Omaha, NE 68102 
(Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Wis- 
consin, Illinois, Minnesota, 
Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, 
Kansas) 

Rocky Mountain Regional 
Office 

P.O. Box 25287 
Denver, CO 80225 
(Montana, North Dakota, 
South Dakota, Wyoming, Utah, 
Colorado) 



Southwest Regional Office 

P.O. Box 728 
Santa Fe, NM 87501 
(Arkansas, Louisiana, Texas, 
Oklahoma, New Mexico, 
northeast corner of Arizona) 

Western Regional Office 

Box 36063 

450 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco, CA 94102 
(California, Nevada, most of 
Arizona, Hawaii) 

Pacific Northwest Regional 
Office 

2001 6th Ave. 

Seattle, WA 98121 

(Idaho, Oregon, Washington) 

Alaska Regional Office 

540 West 5th Avenue 
Room 202 
Anchorage, AK 99501 



Statistical Summary 



Classification 



Number 



Acreage 



National Parks 


48 


National Monuments 


78 


National Preserves 


12 


National Lakeshores 


4 


National Rivers (includes Wild and Scenic 


10 


Rivers and Riverways) 




National Seashores 


11 


National Historic Sites 


62 


National Memorials 


23 


National Military Parks 


10 


National Battlefield Parks 


3 


National Battlefields 


10 


National Battlefield Site 


1 


National Cemeteries (includes Administrative Sites) 2 




National Historical Parks 


26 


National Recreation Areas 


17 


National Parkways 


4 


National Scenic Trail 


1 


Parks (other) 


10 


National Capital Parks 


1 


White House 


1 


National Mall 


1 




"333 



1 Acreages as of January 1, 1982. 

2 Administered in conjunction with associated National Park System units; 
not listed separately in this publication; acreage 1,616.35. 



46,862,406.81 

4,693,988.34 

21,993,219.01 

197,907.88 

525,747.88 

601,839.61 

17,380.71 

8,228.10 

34,668.22 

8,166.80 

11,037.62 

1.00 

150,254.21 

3,659,040.12 

163,442.29 

52,034.25 

32,026.39 

6,468.88 

18.07 

146.35 

79,017,972.54 



10 




7 



i 



■; 






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JJtone House, shown here in a historic photograph, was used 
as a field hospital eUiringJjoth Battles of Manassas. TodayltJs 
part of Manassas National Battlefield Park in Virginia* 



iiss*? 



Alabama 



Horseshoe Bend 
National Military Park 

Route 1, Box 103 
Daviston, AL 36256 



Natchez Trace Parkway 

(See Mississippi) 

Russell Cave 
National Monument 

Route I, Box 175 
Bridgeport, AL 35740 

Tuskegee Institute 
National Historic Site 

399 Old Montgomery Road 
Tuskegee Institute, AL 
36088 



Gen. Andrew Jackson's forces broke the power of the Creek Indian 
Confederacy and opened Alabama and other parts of the Old Southwest 
to settlement after fierce fighting here Mar. 27, 1814, in the battle on the 
Tallapoosa River. 
Authorized July 25, 1956. 
Acreage— 2,040.00, all Federal. 



An almost continuous archeological record of human habitation from at 
least 7000 B.C. to about A.D. 1650 is revealed in this cave. 
Proclaimed May 11, 1961. 
Acreage— 310.45, all Federal. 

Booker T. Washington founded this college for black Americans in 1881. 
Preserved here are the brick buildings the students constructed them- 
selves, Washington's home, and the George Washington Carver Muse- 
um. An antebellum mansion serves as park headquarters and visitor 
center. 

Authorized Oct. 26, 1974. 
Acreage— 74.39 Federal: 24.09 Nonfederal: 50.30. 



Alaska 



Alagnak Wild River 

c/o Katmai National Park 

and Preserve 

P.O. Box 7 

King Salmon, AK 99613 



Aniakchak National 
Monument and Preserve 

P.O. Box 7 

King Salmon, AK 99613 



Bering Land Bridge 
National Preserve 

General Delivery 
Nome, AK 99762 



Cape Krusenstern 
National Monument 

General Delivery 
Kotzebue, AK 99752 

12 



The Alagnak River flows from Kubalek Lake in Katmai National Preserve 
and offers 69 miles of outstanding Whitewater floating. The river is also 
noted for abundant wildlife and sport fishing for five species of salmon. 
Portions of the main stem and the principal tributary, the Novianuk, lie 
outside and westward of Katmai. 
Established: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 69. 

The Aniakchak Caldera, covering some 30 square miles, is one of the 

great dry calderas in the world. Located in the volcanically active Aleutian 

Mountains, the Aniakchak last erupted in 1933. The crater includes lava 

flows, cinder cones, and explosion pits, as well as Surprise Lake, which 

cascades through a 1 , 500-foot gash in the crater wall. The site contains 

the Aniakchak Wild River. NO FEDERAL FACILITIES. 

Proclaimed as Aniakchak National Monument Dec. 1 , 1 978; established 

as a national monument and preserve Dec. 2, 1 980. 

Acreage— National monument: 136,955, all Federal. National Preserve: 

466,238 Federal: 380,045 Nonfederal: 86, 193. 

Located on the Seward Peninsula in northwest Alaska, the preserve is a 

remnant of the land bridge that once connected Asia with North America 

more than 13,000 years ago. Paleontological and archeological resources 

abound; large populations of migrating birds nest here. Ash explosion 

craters and lava flows, rare in the Arctic, are also present. NO FEDERAL 

FACILITIES. 

Proclaimed as Bering Land Bridge National Monument Dec. 1, 1978; 

established as a national preserve Dec. 2, 1 980. 

Acreage— 2, 774, 182 Federal: 2,457,000 Nonfederal: 317, 182. 

Archeological sites located along a succession of 114 lateral beach 
ridges illustrate Eskimo communities of every known cultural period in 
Alaska, dating back some 4,000 years. Older sites are located inland, 
along the foothills. The monument includes a representative example of 



Denali 

National Park and Preser/e 

P.O. Box 9 

McKinley Park, AK 99755 



Gates of the Arctic 
National Park and Preserve 

P.O. Box 74680 
Fairbanks, AK 99707 



Glacier Bay 

National Park and Preserve 

P.O. Box 1089 
Juneau, AK 99802 



Katmai 

National Park and Preserve 

P.O. Box 7 

King Salmon, AK 99613 



Kenai Fjords National Park 

General Delivery 
Seward, AK 99664 



the arctic coastline along the Chukchi Sea. NO FEDERAL FACILITIES. 
Proclaimed Dec. 1, 1978. Boundary change: Dec. 2, 1980. 
Acreage— 656,685 Federal: 560,000 Nonfederal: 96,685. 

The park contains North America's highest mountain, 20,320-foot Mount 

McKinley. Large glaciers of the Alaska Range, caribou, Dall sheep, 

moose, grizzly bears, and timber wolves are other highlights of this 

national park and preserve. 

Established as Mt. McKinley National Park Feb. 26, 1917. Established as 

Denali National Park and Preserve Dec. 2, 1980. Wilderness designated 

Dec. 2, 1980. 

Boundary changes: Jan. 30, 1922; Mar. 19, 1932. 

Acreage— National park: 4,698,583, all Federal. National preserve: 

1,335,380 Federal: 996,910 Nonfederal: 338,470. Wilderness area: 

1,900,000. 

Lying entirely north of the Arctic Circle, the park and preserve includes a 
portion of the Central Brooks Range, the northernmost extension of the 
Rocky Mountains. Often referred to as the greatest remaining wilderness 
in North America, this the Nation's second largest unit of the National 
Park System, is characterized by jagged peaks, gentle arctic valleys, wild 
rivers, and numerous lakes. The forested southern slopes contrast to the 
barren northern reaches of the site at the edge of Alaska's "north slope." 
The park and preserve contains the Alatna, John, Kobuk, part of the 
Noatak, the North Fork of the Koyukuk, and the Tinayguk Wild Rivers. NO 
FEDERAL FACILITIES. 

Proclaimed Gates of the Arctic National Monument Dec. 1 , 1 978; estab- 
lished as a national park and preserve Dec. 2, 1 980. Wilderness desig- 
nated Dec. 2, 1980. 

Acreage— National park: 7,498,066 Federal: 7,008,673 Nonfederal: 
489,393. National preserve: 943,327, all Federal. Wilderness area: 
4,801,000. 

Great tidewater glaciers, a dramatic range of plant communities from 
rocky terrain recently covered by ice to lush temperate rain forest, and a 
large variety of animals, including brown and black bear, mountain goats, 
whales, seals, and eagles can be found within the park. Also included are 
Mount Fairweather, the highest peak in southeast Alaska, and the U.S. 
portion of the Alsek River. 

Proclaimed Glacier Bay National Monument Feb. 25, 1925; established 
as a national park and preserve Dec. 2, 1 980; Boundary changes: April 
18,1939; March 31, 1955; December 1 , 1 978. Wilderness designated Dec. 
2, 1980. 

Acreage— National park: 3,220,396 Federal: 3,220, 198 Nonfederal: 198. 
National preserve: 54,948, all Federal. Wilderness area: 2,270,000. 

Variety marks this vast land: lakes, forests, mountains, and marshlands all 
abound in wildlife. The Alaska brown bear, the world's largest carnivore, 
thrives here, feeding upon red salmon which spawn in the many lakes 
and streams. Wild rivers and renowned sport fishing add to the attrac- 
tions of this subarctic environment. Here, in 1917, Novarupta Volcano 
erupted violently, forming the ash filled "Valley of Ten Thousand 
Smokes" where steam rose from countless fumaroles in the ash. Today 
only a few active vents remain. The park and preserve contains part of 
the Alagnak Wild River. 

Proclaimed as Katmai National Monument Sept. 24, 1918; established as 
a national park and preserve Dec. 2, 1980. Wilderness designated Dec. 
2, 1980. 

Acreage— National park: 3,678,929 Federal: 3,544,900 Nonfederal: 
134, 029. National preserve: 4 10,473, all Federal. Wilderness area: 
3,473,000. 

The park, within 20 miles of Seward, includes one of the four major ice 
caps in the U.S., the Harding Icefield. Glaciers radiating from the 
700-square-mile icefield continue to cut deep glacial valleys, many ending 
at tidewater. The coastal fjords and associated offshore islands are 

13 



remnants of "drowned" mountains. Here a rich varied rain forest is home 
to sea lions, sea otters, seals, and tens of thousands of breeding birds, 
including puffins, murres, and auklets. NO FEDERAL FACILITIES. 
Proclaimed Kenai Fjords National Monument Dec. 1 , 1 978; established as 
a national park Dec. 2, 1 980. 
Acreage— 676,667 Federal: 567,000 Nonfederal: 109,667. 



Klondike Gold Rush 
National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 517 
Skagway, AK 99840 
(See also Washington) 

Kobuk Valley National Park 

General Delivery 
Kotzebue, AK 99752 



Historic buildings in Skagway and portions of Chilkoot and White Pass 

Trails, all prominent in the 1898 gold rush, are included in the park. 

LIMITED FEDERAL FACILITIES. 

Established June 30, 1976. 

Acreage— 13,271 Federal: 11,745 Nonfederal: 1,526. 

Embracing the central valley of the Kobuk River, the park, located entirely 
north of the Arctic' Circle, includes a blend of biological, geological, and 
cultural resources. Here, in the northmost extent of the boreal forest, a 
rich array of arctic wildlife can be found, including critical caribou migra- 
tion routes, grizzly and black bear, wolf, and fox. The 25-square-mile 
Great Kobuk Sand Dunes rise 100 feet above the surrounding arctic 
terrain, just south of the placid Kobuk River. Archeological sites revealing 
more than 10,000 years of human occupation, are among the most 
significant sites known in the Arctic. The park contains the Salmon Wild 
River. NO FEDERAL FACILITIES. 

Proclaimed Kobuk Valley National Monument Dec. 1, 1978; established 
as a national park Dec. 2, 1980. Wilderness designated Dec. 2, 1980. 
Acreage— 1,749,037 Federal: 1,710,000 Nonfederal: 39,037. Wilder- 
ness area: 190,000. 



Lake Clark 

National Park and Preserve 

1011 East Tudor Road 
Anchorage, AK 99503 



Located in the heart of the Chigmit mountains along the western shore of 
Cook Inlet, the park and preserve contains great geologic diversity, 
including jagged peaks, granite spires, glaciers, and two symmetrical 
active volcanoes. More than a score of glacial carved lakes rim the 
mountain mass. More than 40 miles long, Lake Clark is not only the 
largest lake here, but it is also the headwaters for the most important' 
spawning ground in North America. Merrill and Lake Clark Passes cut 
through the mountains and are lined by dozens of glaciers and hundreds 
of waterfalls which cascade over rocky ledges. The park and preserve 
contains the Chilikadrotna, Mulchatna, Tlikakila Wild Rivers. NO FEDER 
AL FACILITIES. 

Proclaimed Lake Clark National Monument Dec. 1, 1978; established as a 
national park and preserve Dec. 2, 1 980. Wilderness designated Dec. 2, 
1980. 

Acreage— National park: 2,633,933 Federal: 2,617,513 Nonfederal: 
16,420 National preserve: 1 ,405,487, all Federal. Wilderness area: 
2,470,000. 



Noatak National Preserve 

General Delivery 
Kotzebue, AK 99752 



The Noatak River basin is the largest mountain-ringed river basin in the 
Nation still virtually unaffected by man. The preserve includes landforms 
of great scientific interest, including the 65-mile-long Grand Canyon of the 
Noatak, a transition zone and migration route for plants and animals 
between subarctic and arctic environments, and an array of flora which is 
among the most diverse anywhere in the earth's northern latitudes. 
Hundreds of archeological sites and rich wildlife populations add to the 
significance of the area. The preserve contains part of the Noatak Wild 
River. NO FEDERAL FACILITIES. 

Proclaimed as Noatak National Monument Dec. 1 , 1 978; established as a 
national preserve Dec. 2, 1980. Wilderness designated Dec. 2, 1980. 
Acreage-G,557,204 Federal: 6,460,000 Nonfederal: 97,204. Wilder- 
ness area: 5,413,000. 



Sitka National 
Historical Park 

P.O. Box 738 
Sitka, AK 99835 



14 



The site of the 1804 fort and battle which marked the last major Tlingit 

Indian resistance to Russian colonization is preserved here. Tlingit totem 

poles are exhibited. 

Proclaimed Mar. 23, 1910; designated a national historical park Oct. 18, 

1972. Boundary changes: Feb. 25, 1952; Oct. 18, 1972. 

Acreage— 107.71 Federal: 107.05 Nonfederal: 0.66. 



Wrangell-St. Elias 
National Park and Preserve 

P.O. Box 29 

Glenn Allen, AK 99588 



The Chugach, Wrangell, and St. Elias mountain ranges converge here in 
what is often referred to as the "mountain kingdom of North America." 
The largest unit of the National Park System, and a day's drive east of 
Anchorage, the park and preserve includes the continent's largest as- 
semblage of glaciers and the greatest collection of peaks above 16,000 
feet, including Mount St. Elias. At 18,008 feet it is the second highest 
peak in the U.S. Adjacent to Canada's Kluane National Park, the site is 
characterized by its remote mountains, valleys, and wild rivers, all rich in 
their concentrations of wildlife. NO FEDERAL FACILITIES. 
Proclaimed as Wrangell-St. Elias National Monument Dec. 1, 1978; 
established as a national park and preserve Dec. 2, 1980. Wilderness 
designated Dec. 2, 1980. 

Acreage— National park: 8,331,406 Federal: 7,445,047 Nonfederal: 
886,359. National preserve: 4,872,953, all Federal. Wilderness area: 
8,700,000. 



Yukon-Charley Rivers 
National Preserve 

P.O. Box 64 
Eagle, AK 99738 



Located along the Canadian border in central Alaska, the preserve 
protects 115 miles of the 1800-mile Yukon River and the entire 88-mile 
Charley River basin. Numerous old cabins and relics are reminders of the 
importance of the Yukon River during the 1898 gold rush. Paleontological 
and archeological sites here add much to our knowledge of man and his 
environment thousands of years ago. Peregrine falcons nest in the high 
bluffs overlooking the river, while the rolling hills that make up the 
preserve are home to a rich array of wildlife. The Charley, a wild river, is 
considered by many to be the best Whitewater river in Alaska. NO 
FEDERAL FACILITIES. 

Proclaimed Yukon-Charley National Monument Dec. 1, 1978; established 
as a national preserve Dec. 2, 1 980. 
Acreage— 2,516,821 Federal: 1,713,000 Nonfederal: 803,821. 



Arizona 



Canyon de Chelly 
National Monument 

P.O. Box 588 
Chinle, AZ 86503 



At the base of sheer red cliffs and in caves in canyon walls are ruins of 
Indian villages built between A.D. 350 and 1300. Modern Navajo Indians 
live and farm here. 

Authorized Feb. 14, 1931. Boundary change: Mar. 1, 1933. 
Acreage— 83,840.00, all Nonfederal. 



Casa Grande 
National Monument 

P.O. Box 518 
Coolidge, AZ 85228 



Perplexing ruins of a massive four-story building, constructed of high-lime 

desert soil by Indians who farmed the Gila Valley 600 years ago, raise 

many unanswered questions for modern man. 

Casa Grande Ruin Reservation authorized Mar. 8, 1889; proclaimed June 

22, 1892; redesignated by proclamation Aug. 3, 1918. Boundary changes: 

Dec. 10, 1909; June 7, 1926. 

Acreage— 472.50, all Federal. 



Chiricahua National Monument 

Dos Cabezas Star Route 
Box 6500 
Willcox, AZ 85643 



The varied rock formations here were created millions of years ago by 
volcanic activity, aided by erosion. 

Proclaimed Apr. 18, 1924; transferred from Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of 
Agriculture, Aug. 10, 1933. Boundary changes: June 10, 1938; Nov. 10, 
1 978. Wilderness designated Oct. 20, 1 976. 

Acreage— 11,088.25 Federal: 10,645.90 Nonfederal: 442,35. Wilder- 
ness area: 9,440. 



15 



Coronado National Memorial 

Route 1, Box 126 
Hereford, AZ 85615 



Fort Bowie 
National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 158 
Bowie, AZ 85605 



Our Hispanic heritage and the first European exploration of the South- 
west, by Francisco Vasquez de Coronado in 1 540-42, are commemorat- 
ed here, near the point where Coronado's expedition entered what is now 
the United States. 

Authorized as International Memorial Aug. 18, 1941; redesignated July 9, 
1952; established Nov. 5, 1952. Boundary changes: Sept. 2, 1960; Nov. 
10, 1978. 
Acreage— 4,674. 16, all Federal. 

Established in 1862, this fort was the focal point of military operations 

against Geronimo and his band of Apaches. The ruins can be reached 

only by trail. 

Authorized Aug. 30, 1964; established July 29, 1972. 

Acreage— 1,000, all Federal. 



Glen Canyon 

National Recreation Area 

(See Utah) 

Grand Canyon National Park 

P.O. Box 129 

Grand Canyon, AZ 86023 



Hohokam Pima 
National Monument 

c/o Casa Grande National 
Monument, P.O. Box 518 
Coolidge, AZ 85228 

Hubbell Trading Post 
National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 150 
Ganado, AZ 86505 

Lake Mead 

National Recreation Area 

(See Nevada) 

Montezuma Castle 
National Monument 

P.O. Box 219 

Camp Verde, AZ 86322 



Navajo National Monument 

Tonalea, AZ 86044 



The park, focusing on the world-famous Grand Canyon of the Colorado 
River, encompasses the entire course of the river and adjacent uplands 
from the southern terminus of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area to 
the eastern boundary of Lake Mead National Recreation Area. The forces 
of erosion have exposed an immense variety of formations which illus- 
trate vast periods of geological history. 

Grand Canyon Forest Reserve proclaimed Feb. 20, 1 893; Grand Canyon 
Game Preserve proclaimed Nov. 28, 1906; Grand Canyon National 
Monument proclaimed Jan. 11, 1908; national park established Feb. 26, 
1919; transferred from Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Aug. 15, 
1919. Boundary changes: Feb. 25, 1927; Mar. 7, 1928. A separate Grand 
Canyon National Monument proclaimed Dec. 22, 1 932. Boundary change: 
Apr. 4, 1940. Marble Canyon National Monument proclaimed Jan. 20, 
1969. All three units and portions of Glen Canyon and «Lake Mead 
National Recreation Areas combined with additional lands as national 
park Jan. 3, 1 975. Designated a World Heritage Site Oct. 24, 1 979. 
Acreage— 1,218,375.24 Federal: 1, 189,636. 18 Nonfederal: 28, 739.06. 

Preserved here are the archeological remains of the Hohokam culture. 
Hohokam is a Pima Indian word meaning "those who have gone." NOT 
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. 
Authorized Oct. 21, 1972. 
Acreage— 1 ,690.00, all Nonfederal. 

This still active trading post illustrates the influence of reservation traders 
on the Indians' way of life. 
Authorized Aug. 28, 1 965. 
Acreage— 160.09, all Federal. 



One of the best-preserved cliff dwellings in the United States, this 5-story, 
20-room castle is 90 percent intact. Montezuma Well is also of archeo- 
logical and geological interest. 

Proclaimed Dec. 8, 1906. Boundary changes: Feb. 23, 1937; Oct. 19, 
1943; Apr. 4, 1947; June 23, 1959; Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 849.75 Federal: 832.92 Nonfederal: 16.83. 

Betatakin, Keet Seel, and Inscription House are three of the largest and 
most elaborate cliff dwellings known. 
Proclaimed Mar. 20, 1909. Boundary change: Mar. 14, 1912. 
Acreage— 360.00, all Federal. 



16 



Organ Pipe Cactus 
National Monument 

Route 1, Box 100 
Ajo, AZ 85321 



Sonoran Desert plants and animals found nowhere else in the United 
States are protected here, and traces of a historic trail, Camino del Diablo. 
Proclaimed Apr. 13, 1937. Wilderness designated Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 330,688.86 Federal: 329,199.10 Nonfederal: 1,489.76. 
Wilderness area: 312,600. 



Petrified Forest 
National Park 

Petrified Forest National 
Park, AZ 86028 



Trees that have petrified, or changed to multicolored stone, Indian ruins 
and petroglyphs, and portions of the colorful Painted Desert are features 
of the park. 

Proclaimed as a national monument Dec. 8, 1906; established as a 
national park Dec. 9, 1962. Boundary changes: July 31, 1911; Nov. 14, 
1930; Nov. 30, 1931; Sept. 23, 1932; Mar. 28, 1958. Wilderness desig- 
nated Oct. 23, 1970. 
Acreage— 93,492.57, all Federal. Wilderness area: 50,260. 



Pipe Spring 
National Monument 

Moccasin, AZ 86022 



The historic fort and other structures, built here by Mormon pioneers, 
memorialize the struggle for exploration and settlement of the Southwest. 
Proclaimed May 31, 1923. 
Acreage — 40.00, all Federal. 



Saguaro National Monument 

Old Spanish Trail 
Route 8, Box 695 
Tucson, AZ 85730 



Giant saguaro cacti, unique to the Sonoran Desert of southern Arizona 

and northwestern Mexico, sometimes reach a height of 50 feet in this 

cactus forest. 

Proclaimed Mar. 1, 1933; transferred from Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of 

Agriculture, Aug. 10, 1933. Boundary changes: Nov. 15, 1961; Oct. 21, 

1976. Wilderness designated Oct. 20, 1976. 

Acreage— 83,576.07 Federal: 81,962.17 Nonfederal: 1,613.90. 

Wilderness area: 71,400. 



Sunset Crater 
National Monument 

Route 3, Box 1 49 
Flagstaff, AZ 86001 



Its upper part colored as if by sunset glow, this volcanic cinder cone with 

summit crater was formed just before A.D. 1 100. 

Proclaimed May 26, 1930; transferred from Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of 

Agriculture, Aug. 10, 1933. 

Acreage— 3,040.00, all Federal. 



tonto National Monument 

P.O. Box 707 
Roosevelt, AZ 85545 



These well-preserved cliff dwellings were occupied during the 13th and 
14th centuries by Salado Indians who farmed in the Salt River Valley. 
Proclaimed Dec. 19, 1907; transferred from Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of 
Agriculture, Aug. 10, 1933. Boundary change: Apr. 1, 1937 
Acreage— 1,120.00, all Federal. 



Tumacacori National Monument 

P.O. Box 67 
Tumacacori, AZ 85460 



This historic Spanish Catholic mission building stands near the site first 

visited by Jesuit Father Kino in t691 . 

Proclaimed Sept. 15, 1908. Boundary changes: Apr. 28, 1959; Nov. 10, 

1978. 

Acreage— 16.65 Federal: 10.15 Nonfederal: 6.50. 



Tuzigoot National Monument 

P.O. Box 68 
Clarkdale, AZ 86324 



Ruins of a large Indian pueblo which flourished in the Verde Valley 
between A.D. 1100 and 1450 have been excavated here. 
Proclaimed July 25, 1939. Boundary change: Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 848.78 Federal: 57.78 Nonfederal: 791.00. 



Walnut Canyon 
National Monument 

Route 1, Box 25 
Flagstaff, AZ 86001 



Wupatki National Monument 

Tuba Star Route 
Flagstaff, AZ 86001 



These cliff dwelings were built in shallow caves under ledges of limestone 
by Pueblo Indians about 800 years ago. 

Proclaimed Nov. 30, 1915; transferred from Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of 
Agriculture, Aug. 10, 1933. Boundary change: Sept. 24, 1938. 
Acreage— 2,249. 46 Federal: 2,011. 62 Nonfederal: 237. 84. 

Ruins of red sandstone pueblos built by farming Indians about A.D. 1065 

are preserved here. The modern Hopi Indians are believed to be partly 

descended from these people. 

Proclaimed Dec. 9, 1924. Boundary changes: July 9, 1937; Jan. 22, 1941; 

Aug. 10, 1961. 

Acreage— 35,253.24, all Federal. 



17 



Arkansas 



Arkansas Post 
National Memorial 

Route 1, Box 16 
Gillett, AR 72055 

Buffalo National River 

P.O. Box 1173 
Harrison, AR 72601 



On this site the first permanent French settlement in the Lower Mississip- 
pi Valley was founded in 1 686. 
Authorized July 6, 1 960. 
Acreage— 389. 18 Federal: 385. 1 1 Nonfederal: 4.07. 

Offering both swift-running and placid stretches, the Buffalo is one of the 
few remaining unpolluted, free-flowing rivers in the lower 48 States. It 
courses through multicolored bluffs and past numerous springs along its 
1 32-mile length. 

Authorized Mar. 1 , 1 972. Wilderness designated Nov. 1 0, 1 978. 
Acreage— 94,146.00 Federal: 73,151.41 Nonfederal: 20,994.59. 
Wilderness Area: 10,529. 



Fort Smith 

National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 1406 

Fort Smith, AR 72902 

(Also in Oklahoma) 

Hot Springs National Park 

P.O. Box 1860, Hot Springs 
National Park, AR 71901 



Pea Ridge 

National Military Park 

Pea Ridge, AR 72751 



One of the first U.S. military posts in the Louisiana Territory, the fort was a 
center of authority for the untamed region to the West from 1817 to 1896. 
Authorized Sept. 13, 1961. Boundary change: Oct. 21, 1976. 
Acreage— 63.04 Federal: 16. 18 (16. 18 in Ark.; none in Ok/a.) 
Nonfederal: 46.86. 

Although the 47 thermal springs fluctuate in flow from 750,000 to 950,000 

gallons a day, the temperature remains near 143T year round. Persons 

suffering from illness or injury often seek relief in the ancient tradition of 

thermal bathing. 

Hot Spring Reservation set aside Apr. 20, 1832; dedicated to public use 

as a park June 16, 1880; redesignated as national park Mar. 4, 1921. 

Boundary changes: June 22, 1892; May 23, 1906; June 5, 1924; June 25, 

1930; Feb. 14, 1931; June 15, 1936; June 24, 1938; Aug 10, 1939; Aug. 

24, 1954; Aug 18, 1958; Sept. 21, 1959. 

Acreage— 5,826.48 Federal: 4,573.85 Nonfederal: 1,252.63. 

The Union victory here on Mar. 7-8, 1862, in one of the major engage- 
ments of the Civil War west of the Mississippi, led to the Union's total 
control of Missouri. 
Authorized July 20, 1956. 
Acreage— 4,300.35 Federal: 4,278.75 Nonfederal: 21.60. 



California 



Cabrillo National Monument 

P.O. Box 6670 

San Diego, CA 92106 



Channel Islands 
National Park 

1699 Anchors Way Dr. 
Ventura, CA 93003 



Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo, Portuguese explorer who claimed the West 
Coast of the United States for Spain in 1 542, is memorialized here. Gray 
whales migrate offshore during the winter. Old Point Loma Lighthouse is 
restored to its most active period— the 1880s. Tidepools found on the 
west side of the park are excellent for studying southern California 
coastal ecology. 

Proclaimed Oct. 14, 1913; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933. 
Boundary changes: Feb. 2, 1959; Sept. 28, 1974. 
Acreage— 143.94, all Federal. 

The park consists of five islands off southern California: Anacapa, San 
Miguel, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz, and Santa Rosa. On these islands 
you can find nesting sea birds, sea lion rookeries, and unique plants. 
Anacapa and Santa Barbara Islands are administered by the National 
Park Service; San Miguel, by the U.S. Navy and the National Park Service. 
A permit is needed to visit the latter. Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa are 
private property. 
Proclaimed a national monument, Apr. 26, 1938; proclaimed a national 



18 



park, March 5, 1980. Boundary changes: June 10, 1949; May 15, 1978; 

Oct. 25, 1978. 

Acreage— 249,353.77 Federal: 10,877.82 Nonfederal: 238,465.95. 



Death Valley 
National Monument 

Death Valley, CA 92328 
(Also in Nev.) 



This large desert, nearly surrounded by high mountains, contains the 

lowest point in the Western Hemisphere. The area includes Scotty's 

Castle, the grandiose home of a famous prospector, and other remnants 

of gold and borax mining activity. 

Proclaimed Feb. 11, 1933. Boundary changes: Mar. 26, 1937; Jan. 17, 

1952. 

Acreage— 2,067,627.68 Federal: 2,048,884.32 (1,938,071.59 in Calif.; 

1 10,812. 73 in Nev.) Nonfederal: 18, 743.36. 



Devils Postpile 
National Monument 

c/o Sequoia and Kings 
Canyon National Parks 
Three Rivers, CA 93271 



Hot lava cooled and cracked some 900,000 years ago to form basalt 

columns 40 to 60 feet high resembling a giant pipe organ. The John Muir 

Trail between Yosemite and Kings Canyon National Parks crosses the 

monument. 

Proclaimed July 6, 1911; transferred from Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of 

Agriculture, Aug. 10, 1933. 

Acreage— 798.46, all Federal. 



Eugene O'Neill 
National Historic Site 

c/o Eugene O'Neill Foundation 
261 Livorna Heights Rd. 
Alamo, CA 94507 



Tao House, near Danville, Calif., was built for Eugene O'Neill, who lived 

here from 1937 to 1944. Several of his best known plays including "The 

Iceman Cometh" and "Long Day's Journey Into Night" were written 

here— now a memorial to the playwright and a future park for the 

performing arts. NOT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. 

Authorized Oct. 12, 1976. 

Acreage— 14 Federal: 13.19 Nonfederal: .81. 



Fort Point 

National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 29333, Presidio 
of San Francisco, CA 94129 



This classic brick and granite mid-1 9th-century coastal fortification is the 
largest on the west coast of North America. 
Established Oct. 16, 1970. 
Acreage— 29.00, all Federal. 



Golden Gate 

National Recreation Area 

Fort Mason 

San Francisco, CA 94123 



The park encompasses shoreline areas of San Francisco and Marin 

Counties, including ocean beaches, redwood forest, lagoons, marshes, 

ships of the National Maritime Museum, historic military properties, a 

cultural center at Fort Mason, and Alcatraz Island, site of a famous 

penitentiary. 

Established: Oct 27, 1972. Boundary changes: Dec. 26, 1974; Nov. 10, 

1978. 

Acreage— 38,677 Federal: 23,966 Nonfederal: 14,711. 



John Muir 

National Historic Site 

4202 Alhambra Ave. 
Martinez, CA 94553 



The home of John Muir and adjacent Martinez Adobe commemorate 
Muir's contribution to conservation and literature. 
Authorized Aug. 31, 1964. 
Acreage— 8.90, all Federal. 



Joshua Tree 
National Monument 

74485 National Monument Dr. 
Twentynine Palms, CA 92277 



A representative stand of Joshua-trees and a great variety of plants and 
animals, including the desert bighorn, exist in this desert region. 
Proclaimed Aug. 10, 1936. Boundary changes: Sept. 25, 1950; June 30, 
1961. Wilderness designated Oct. 20, 1976. 

Acreage— 559,959.79 Federal: 548,671.39 Nonfederal: 11,288.40. 
Wilderness area: 429,690. 



Kings Canyon National Park 

Three Rivers, CA 93271 



Two enormous canyons of the Kings River and the summit peaks of the 

High Sierra dominate this mountain wilderness. General Grant Grove, 

with its giant sequoias, is a detached section of the park. 

General Grant National Park established Oct. 1, 1890; redesignated and 

combined with additional land Mar. 4, 1940. Other boundary changes: 

June 21, 1940; Aug. 14, 1958; Aug. 6, 1965. 

Acreage— 460, 136. 19 Federal: 459, 995. 4 1 Nonfederal: 140. 79. 



19 



Lassen Volcanic 
National Park 

Mineral, CA 96063 



Lassen Peak, erupted intermittently from 1914 to 1921. Active volcanism 
includes hot springs, steaming fumaroles, mud pots, and sulfurous vents. 
Proclaimed as Lassen Peak and Cinder Cone National Monuments May 
6, 1 907; made part of Lassen Volcanic National Park when established on 
Aug. 9, 1916. Boundary changes: Apr. 26, 1928; May 21, 1928; Jan. 19, 
1929; Apr. 19, 1930; July 3, 1930; Aug. 10, 1961; Apr. 11, 1972. Wilder- 
ness designated Oct. 19, 1972. 

Acreage— 106,372.22 Federal: 105,800.25 Nonfederal: 571.97. 
Wilderness area: 78,982. 



Lava Beds National Monument 

P.O. Box 867 
Tulelake, CA 96134 



Muir Woods 
National Monument 

Mill Valley, CA 94941 



Pinnacles National Monument 

Paicines, CA 95043 



Volcanic activity spewed forth molten rock and lava here creating an 

incredibly rugged landscape— a natural fortress used by the Indians in the 

Modoc Indian War, 1872-73. 

Proclaimed Nov. 21, 1925; transferred from Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of 

Agriculture, Aug. 10, 1933. Boundary changes: Apr. 27, 1951; Oct. 26, 

1 974. Wilderness designated Oct. 1 3, 1 972. 

Acreage — 46,821.33, all Federal Wilderness area: 28,460. 

This virgin stand of coastal redwoods was named for John Muir, writer 

and conservationist. 

Proclaimed Jan. 9, 1908. Boundary changes: Sept. 22, 1921; Apr. 5, 

1935; June 26, 1951; Sept. 8, 1959; Apr. 11, 1972. 

Acreage— 553.55 Federal: 522.98 Nonfederal: 30.57. 

Spirelike rock formations 500 to 1 ,200 feet high, with caves and a variety 

of volcanic features, rise above the smooth contours of the surrounding 

countryside. 

Proclaimed Jan. 16, 1908. Boundary changes: May 7, 1923; July 2, 1924; 

Apr. 13, 1931; July 11, 1933; Dec. 5, 1941; Oct. 20, 1976. Wilderness 

designated Oct. 20, 1 976. 

Acreage— 16,221.77 Federal: 14,965.72 Nonfederal: 1,256.05. 

Wilderness area: 12,952. 



Point Reyes 
National Seashore 

Point Reyes, CA 94956 



This peninsula near San Francisco is noted for its long beaches backed 
by tall cliffs, lagoons and esteros, forested ridges, and offshore bird and 
sea lion colonies. Part of the area remains a private pastoral zone. 
Authorized Sept. 13, 1962. Established Oct. 20, 1972. Boundary changes: 
Dec. 26, 1974; Nov. 10, 1978; March 5, 1980. Wilderness designated Oct. 
18, 1976. 

Acreage— 67,265.22 Federal: 61,446.69 Nonfederal: 5,818.53. 
Land area: 53, 883. 98. Wilderness area: 25, 370. 



Redwood National Park 

1111 Second Street 
Crescent City, CA 95531 



Coastal redwood forests with virgin groves of ancient trees, including the 

world's tallest, live in a mixture of sun and fog. The park includes 40 miles 

of scenic Pacific coastline. 

Established Oct. 2, 1 968. Boundary change: March 27, 1 978. Designated 

a World Heritage Site, Sept. 2, 1980. 

Acreage— 109,225.54 Federal: 74,313.90 Nonfederal: 34,941 .64. 

Land area: 106,000. 



Santa Monica Mountains 
National Recreation Area 

23018 Ventura Blvd. 
Woodland Hills, CA 91364 



Sequoia National Park 

Three Rivers, CA 93271 



This park is a large, rugged landscape, covered with chaparral, fronting 
on the sandy beaches north of Los Angeles. The area will provide 
recreational opportunities within easy reach of millions in southern Califor- 
nia. LIMITED FEDERAL FACILITIES. 
Established Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 150,000 Federal: 3,000 Nonfederal: 147,000. 

Great groves of giant sequoias, the world's largest living things, Mineral 
King Valley, and Mount Whitney, the highest mountain in the U.S. outside 
of Alaska, are spectacular attractions here in the High Sierra. 
Established Sept. 25, 1890. Boundary changes: Oct. 1, 1890; July 3, 
1926; Dec. 21, 1943; July 21, 1949; Oct. 19, 1951; Aug. 14, 1958; Nov. 
10, 1978. 
Acreage— 403, 023. 00 Federal: 402, 107. 5 1 Nonfederal: 9 15. 49. 



20 



Whiskeytown-Shasta-Trinity 
National Recreation Area 

P.O. Box 188 
Whiskeytown, CA 96095 



Whiskeytown Unit with its mountainous backcountry and large reservoir 
provides a multitude of outdoor recreation opportunities. Shasta and Clair 
Engle Units are administered by Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. 
Authorized Nov. 8, 1965; established Oct. 21, 1972. 
Acreage— 42, 497. 45 Federal: 42, 430. 4 1 Nonfederal: 67 04. 



Yosemite National Park 

P.O. Box 577, Yosemite 
National Park, CA 95389 



Granite peaks and domes rise high above broad meadows in the heart of 
the Sierra Nevada; groves of giant sequoias dwarf other trees and tiny 
wildflowers; and mountains, lakes and waterfalls, including the Nation's 
highest, are found here. 

Yosemite Valley and Mariposa Big Tree Grove granted to State June 30, 
1 864; park established Oct. 1 , 1 890; State returned granted lands Mar. 3, 
1905. Boundary changes: Feb. 7, 1905; June 11, 1906; Dec. 19, 1913; 
May 28, 1928; Apr. 14, 1930; Feb. 14, 1931; Aug. 13, 1932; July 9, 1937. 
El Portal site authorized Sept. 2, 1958. 

Acreage— 760,917.18 (does not include 1,397.99 acres comprising El 
Portal administrative site, adjacent to park). Federal: 759, 197.57 Non- 
federal: 1,719.61. 



Colorado 



Bent's Old Fort 
National Historic Site 

35110 Highway 194 East 
La Junta, CO 81050 



As a principal outpost of civilization on the Southern Plains in the early 
1800s and rendezvous for Indians, the post became the center of a vast 
fur-trading empire in the West. 

Authorized June 3, 1960. Boundary change: Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 800.00 Federal: 178.00 Nonfederal: 622.00. 



Black Canyon of the Gunnison 
National Monument 

P.O. Box 1648 
Montrose, CO 81401 



Shadowed depths of this sheer-walled canyon accentuate the darkness 
of ancient rocks of obscure origin. 

Proclaimed Mar. 2, 1933. Boundary changes: May 16, 1938; Oct. 28, 
1939; Apr. 13, 1960. Wilderness designated Oct. 20, 1976. 
Acreage— 13,672.13 Federal: 13,363.14 Nonfederal: 308.99. 
Wilderness area; 1 1, 180. 



Colorado National Monument 

Fruita, CO 81521 



Sheer-walled canyons, towering monoliths, weird formations, dinosaur 

fossils, and remains of prehistoric Indian cultures reflect the environment 

and history of this colorful sandstone country. 

Proclaimed May 24, 1911. Boundary changes: Mar. 3, 1 933; Aug. 7, 1 959; 

Oct. 21, 1976; Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 20,449.87 Federal: 19,918.53 Nonfederal: 531.34. 



Curecanti 

National Recreation Area 

P.O. Box 1040 
Gunnison, CO 81230 



Three lakes— Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal— extend for 40 miles 

along the Gunnison River. When full, Blue Mesa Lake, with a surface area 

of 14 square miles, is the largest lake in Colorado. 

Administered under cooperative agreement with Bureau of Reclamation, 

U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Feb. 11, 1965. 

Acreage— 42, 1 14.47, all Federal. 



Dinosaur National Monument 

P.O. Box 210 
Dinosaur, CO 81610 
(Also in Utah) 



Spectacular canyons were cut by the Green and Yampa Rivers through 

upfolded mountains. A quarry contains fossil remains of dinosaurs and 

other ancient animals. 

Proclaimed Oct. 4, 1915. Boundary changes: July 14, 1938; Sept. 8, 1960; 

Feb. 21, 1963; Oct. 9, 1964; Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 211,060.70 Federal: 203,814.92 (165,350.57 in Colo.; 

38, 464. 35 in Utah) Nonfederal: 7, 424.28. 



21 



Florissant Fossil Beds 
National Monument 

P.O. Box 185 
Florissant, CO 80816 



A wealth of fossil insects, seeds, and leaves of the Oligocene Period are 

preserved here in remarkable detail. Here, too, is an unusual display of 

standing petrified sequoia stumps. 

Authorized Aug. 20, 1969. 

Acreage— 5,998.09. Federal: 5,992.32 Nonfederal: 5.77. 



Great Sand Dunes 
National Monument 

Mosca, CO 81146 



Among the largest and highest in the United States, these dunes were 
deposited over thousands of years by southwesterly winds blowing 
through the passes of the lofty Sangre de Cristo Mountains. 
Proclaimed Mar. 17, 1932. Boundary changes: Mar. 12, 1946; June 7, 
1956; Nov. 10, 1978. Wilderness designated Oct. 20, 1976. 
Acreage— 38, 95 1. 50 Federal: 36, 426. 16 Nonfederal: 2, 525. 34. 
Wilderness area: 33,450. 



Hovenweep National Monument 

c/o Mesa Verde National 
Park, Mesa Verde National 
Park, CO 81330 
(Also in Utah) 

Mesa Verde National Park 

Mesa Verde National 
Park, CO 81330 



Pre-Columbian Indians built these 6 groups of towers, pueblos, and cliff 

dwellings. 

Proclaimed Mar. 2, 1923. Boundary changes; Apr. 26, 1951; Nov. 20, 

1952; Apr. 6, 1956. 

Acreage— 785.43, all Federal (345.43 in Colo.; 440.00 in Utah). 

These pre-Columbian cliff dwellings and other works of early man are the 
most notable and best preserved in the United States. 
Established June 29, 1906. Boundary changes: June 30, 1913; May 27, 
1 932; Dec. 23, 1 963. Wilderness designated Oct. 20, 1 976. Designated a 
World Heritage Site, Sept. 6, 1978. 

Acreage— 52,085.14 Federal: 51,894.27 Nonfederal: 190.87 Wilder- 
ness area: 8, 100. 



Rocky Mountain National Park 

Estes Park, CO 80517 



The park's rich scenery, typifying the massive grandeur of the Rocky 
Mountains, is accessible by Trail Ridge Road, which crosses the Conti- 
nental Divide. Peaks towering over 14,000 feet shadow wildlife and 
wildflowers in these 412 square miles of the Rockies' Front Range. 
Established Jan. 26, 1915. Boundary changes: Feb. 14, 1917; Sept. 18, 
1922; June 2, 1924; Feb. 24, 1925; June 9, 1926; July 17, 1930; Jan. 11, 
1932; Mar. 5, 1936; Aug. 24, 1949; June 27, 1950; Apr. 21, 1959; Sept. 
23, 1960; Oct. 26, 1974. 
Acreage— 263, 790. 69 Federal: 263, 333. 08 Nonfederal: 457. 6 1. 



Yucca House 
National Monument 

c/o Mesa Verde National Park 
Mesa Verde National 
Park, CO 81330 



Ruins of these large prehistoric Indian pueblos are as yet unexcavated. 
NOT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. 
Proclaimed Dec. 19, 1919. 
Acreage— 10.00, all Federal. 



Connecticut 



Appalachian 
National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



District of Columbia 



Chesapeake and Ohio Canal 
National Historical Park 

(See Maryland) 



22 



Ford's Theatre 
National Historic Site 

511 Tenth St., NW 
Washington, DC 20004 



On Apr. 14, 1865, President Lincoln was shot while attending a show 
here. He was carried across the street to the Petersen house, where he 
died the next morning. The theatre contains the Olroyd Collection of 
Lincolniana. 

Act of Apr. 7, 1 866, provided for purchase of Ford's Theatre by Federal 
Government; designation changed to Lincoln Museum Feb. 12, 1932; 
redesignated Ford's Theatre (Lincoln Museum) Apr. 14, 1965. House 
Where Lincoln Died authorized June 11, 1896. Both areas transferred 
from Office of Public Buildings and Public Parks of the National Capital 
Aug. 10, 1933; combined as Ford's Theatre National Historic Site June 
23, 1970. Boundary change: June 23, 1970. 
Acreage— 0.29, all Federal. 



Frederick Douglass Home 

1411 WSt., SE 
Washington, DC 20020 



From 1877 to 1895, this was the home of the Nation's leading 19th- 
century black spokesman. He was U.S. minister to Haiti, 1889. 
Authorized Sept. 5, 1 962. 
Acreage— 8.08, all Federal. 



John F. Kennedy Center 
for the Performing Arts 

National Park Service, 
2700 F St., NW 
Washington, DC 20566 



Cultural events are presented in this structure designed by Edward Durell 
Stone. The building contains the Eisenhower Theater, a concert hall, an 
opera house, the American Film Institute Theater, the Terrace Theater, 
and restaurants. 

Authorized as National Cultural Center, Sept. 2, 1958; name changed 
Jan. 23, 1964; nonperforming arts functions transferred from Smithsonian 
Institution to National Park Service June 16, 1972. 
Acreage— 17.50, all Federal. 



Lincoln Memorial 

c/o National Capital Region, 
National Park Service 
1100 Ohio Dr., SW 
Washington, DC 20242 



Lyndon Baines Johnson 
Memorial Grove on the Potomac 

c/o George Washington 
Memorial Parkway 
Turkey Run Park 
McLean, VA 22101 



This classical structure of great beauty contains a marble seated statue 

1 9 feet high of the Great Emancipator by sculptor Daniel Chester French. 

Architect of the building was Henry Bacon. 

Authorized Feb. 9, 1911; transferred from Office of Public Buildings and 

Public Parks of the National Capital Aug. 10, 1933. 

Acreage— 163.63, all Federal. 

A living memorial to the 36th President, the park overlooks the Potomac 

River vista of the Capital. The design features 500 white pines and 

engravings on Texas granite. 

Authorized Dec. 28, 1973; dedicated Sept. 27, 1974. 

A creage— 1 7. 00, all Federal. 



National Capital Parks 

1100 Ohio Dr., SW 
Washington, DC 20242 
(Also In Maryland) 



The park system of the Nation's Capital comprises parks, parkways, and 
reservations in the Washington metropolitan area, including such proper- 
ties as the Battleground National Cemetery, the President's Parks (La- 
fayette Park north of the White House and the Ellipse south of the White 
House), the parks flanking the Great Falls of the Potomac, a variety of 
military fortifications, and green areas. 

When Congress established a permanent National Capital in 1790, the 
city's Federal Commissioners were given the power "to purchase or 
accept such quantity of land as the President shall deem proper for the 
use of the United States." Under this authority the Commissioners 
purchased Washington's first 17 public reservations and accepted dona- 
tions of other lands required for the street system of L'Enf ant's plan. 
Today more than 300 park units derive from these lands. Office of Public 
Buildings and Public Parks of the National Capital was abolished and 
public reservations were transferred to National Capital Parks, National 
Park Service, Aug. 10, 1933. 
Acreage— 6,469.56, all Federal. 



23 



National Mall 

c/o National Capital Region 
National Park Service 
1100 Ohio Dr., SW 
Washington, DC 20242 



This landscaped park extending from the Capitol to the Washington 
Monument was envisioned as a formal park in the L'Enfant Plan for the 
city of Washington. 

Approved July 1 6, 1 790, except for 42 acres transferred later from other 
agencies; 30 Seaton Park acres include some transfers from other 
agencies and D.C. Transferred from Office of Public Buildings and Public 
Parks of the National Capital Aug. 10, 1933. 
Acreage— 146.35, all Federal. 



Rock Creek Park 

5000 Glover Rd., NW 
Washington, DC 20015 



One of the largest urban parks in the world, this wooded preserve 

contains a wide range of natural, historical, and recreational resources in 

the midst of metropolitan Washington, D.C. 

Authorized Sept. 20, 1890; transferred to National Park Service June 10, 

1933. 

Acreage— 1, 754.37, all Federal. 



Sewall-Belmont House 
National Historic Site 

144 Constitution Ave., NE 
Washington, DC 20002 



Rebuilt after fire damage from the War of 1812, this red brick house is one 
of the oldest on Capitol Hill. It has been the National Woman's Party 
headquarters since 1929 and commemorates the party's founder and 
women's suffrage leader, Alice Paul, and associates. 
Authorized Oct. 26, 1974. 
Acreage— 0.35, all Nonfederal. 



Theodore Roosevelt Island 

c/o George Washington Memorial 
Parkway, Turkey Run Park, 
McLean, VA 22101 



On this wooded island sanctuary in the Potomac River, trails lead to an 

imposing statue of Roosevelt, the conservation-minded 26th President. 

His tenets on nature, manhood, youth, and the state are inscribed on 

tablets. 

Authorized May 21, 1932; transferred from Office of Public Buildings and 

Public Parks of the National Capital Aug. 10, 1933. 

Acreage— 88.50 all Federal. 



Thomas Jefferson Memorial 

c/o National Capital Region, 
National Park Service 
1100 Ohio Dr., SW 
Washington, DC 20242 



This circular, colonnaded structure, in the classic style introduced in this 
country by Jefferson, memorializes the author of the Declaration of 
Independence and President from 1801 to 1809. The interior walls 
present inscriptions from his writings. The heroic statute was sculptured 
by Rudulph Evans; architects were John Russell Pope and associates, 
Otto Eggers and Daniel Higgins. 
Authorized June 26, 1 934. 
Acreage— 18.36 all Federal. 



Washington Monument 

c/o National Capital Region, 
National Park Service 
1100 Ohio Dr., SW 
Washington, DC 20242 



A dominating feature of the Nation's Capital, this 555-foot obelisk honors 

the country's first President, George Washington. The architect-designer 

was Robert Mills. 

Authorized Jan. 31, 1848; transferred from Office of Public Buildings and 

Public Parks of the National Capital Aug. 10, 1933. 

Acreage— 106.01 all Federal. 



White House 

c/o National Capital Region, 
National Park Service 
1 100 Ohio Dr., SW 
Washington, DC 20242 



The White House has been the residence and office of the Presidents of 
the United States since Nov. 1800. The cornerstone was laid Oct. 13, 
1792, on the site selected by George Washington and included in the 
L'Enfant Plan; renovations were made 1949-52. 
Transferred Aug. 10, 1933, to National Park Service, U.S. Dept. of the 
Interior, the direct legal successor of three Federal Commissioners, who 
were appointed by the President under act of July 16, 1790, and directed 
initial construction. Their authority developed through acts of May 1, 
1802; Apr. 29, 1816; Mar. 3, 1849; Mar. 2, 1867; July 1, 1898; Feb. 26, 
1925; Mar. 3, 1933; and Executive Order of June 10, 1933. Under act of 
Sept. 22, 1961, "the White House . . . shall be administered pursuant to 
the act of August 25, 1916" and supplementary and amendatory acts. 
Acreage— 18.07, all Federal. 



24 



Florida 



Big Cypress National Preserve 

P.O. Box 1247 
Naples, FL 33939 



Biscayne National Park 

P.O. Box 1369 
Homestead, FL 33030 



Adjoining the northwest section of Everglades National Park, this large 
area provides a freshwater supply crucial to the park's survival. Subtropi- 
cal plant and animal life abounds in this ancestral home of the Seminole 
and Miccosukee Indians. 
Authorized Oct. 11, 1974. 
Acreage— 570,000 Federal: 231,991.21 Nonfederal: 338,008.79. 

Most of the park is reef and water, but within its boundaries about 33 
keys, or islands, form a north-south chain, with Biscayne Bay on the west 
and the Atlantic Ocean on the east. 

Authorized as Biscayne National Monument Oct. 18, 1968; redesignated 
and enlarged June 28, 1980. Boundary change: Oct. 26, 1974. 
Acreage— 180,275.65 Federal: 95,070.84 Nonfederal: 85,056.81 . 
Land area: 4,373.23. 



Canaveral National Seashore 
P.O. Box 2583 
Titusville, FL 32780 



Twenty-five miles of undeveloped barrier island preserve the natural 
beach, dune, marsh, and lagoon habitats for a variety of wildlife, including 
many species of birds. The Kennedy Space Center occupies the southern 
end of the island and temporary closures are possible due to launch- 
related activities. The area includes a portion of 140,393-acre Merritt 
Island National Wildlife Refuge, administered by Fish and Wildlife Service, 
U.S. Dept. of the Interior. 
Established Jan. 3, 1975. 

Acreage— 57,627.07 Federal: 41,449.36 Nonfederal: 16,177.71. 
Land area: 29,545.07. 



Castillo de San Marcos 
National Monument 

1 Castillo Dr. 

St. Augustine, FL 32084 



Construction of this oldest masonry fort in continental United States was 
started in 1672 by the Spanish to protect St. Augustine, first permanent 
settlement by Europeans in continental United States (1565). The floor 
plan is the result of "modernization" work done in the 18th century. 
Proclaimed as Fort Marion National Monument Oct. 1 5, 1 924; transferred 
from War Department Aug. 10, 1933; changed to Castillo de San Marcos 
National Monument June 5, 1942. 
Boundary changes: June 29, 1936; July 5, 1960. 
Acreage— 20.49 Federal 19.78 Nonfederal: 0.71. 



De Soto National Memorial 

75th St. NW 
Bradenton, FL 33505 



The landing of Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto in Florida in 1539 and 
the first extensive organized exploration of what is now the southern 
United States by Europeans are commemorated here. 
Authorized Mar. 11, 1948. Boundary change: Sept 8, 1960. 
Acreage— 30.00 Federal: 24.78 Nonfederal: 5.22. 



Everglades National Park 

P.O. Box 279 
Homestead, FL 33030 



This largest remaining subtropical wilderness in the coterminous United 
States has extensive fresh- and saltwater areas, open Everglades prai- 
ries, and mangrove forests. Abundant wildlife includes rare and colorful 
birds. 

Authorized May 30, 1934. Boundary changes: July 2, 1958; Sept. 14, 
1959; Sept. 2, 1960; Sept. 12, 1964; Oct. 17, 1969. Wilderness designat- 
ed Nov. 10, 1978. Designated a World Heritage Site, Oct. 24, 1979. 
Acreage— 1,398,800.00 Federal: 1,397,506.26 Nonfederal: 1,293.74. 
Wilderness area: 1,296,500. Water area: 625,000. 



Fort Caroline 
National Memorial 

12713 Fort Caroline Rd. 
Jacksonville, FL 32225 






The fort overlooks the site of a French Huguenot colony of 1564-65, the 

second French attempt at settlement within the present United States. 

Here, the French and Spanish began two centuries of European colonial 

rivalry in North America. 

Authorized Sept. 21, 1950. Boundary changes April 11, 1972; Nov. 10, 

1978. 

Acreage— 138.88 Federal: 128.37 Nonfederal: 10.51. 



25 



Fort Jefferson 
National Monument 

c/o U.S. Coast Guard Base, 
Key West, FL 33040 



Built in 1856 to help control the Florida Straits, this is the largest 

all-masonry fortification in the Western world; it served as a Federal 

military prison during and after the Civil War. The bird refuge and marine 

life here are features. 

Proclaimed Jan. 4, 1935. 

Acreage— 47, 125.00, all Federal. Land area: 39.28. 



Fort Matanzas 
National Monument 

c/o Castillo de San Marcos 

National Monument 

1 Castillo Dr. 

St. Augustine, FL 32084 



This Spanish fort was built 1740-42 to protect St. Augustine from the 

British. 

Proclaimed Oct. 1 5, 1 924; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 1 0, 1 933. 

Boundary changes: Jan. 9, 1935; Mar. 24, 1948. 

Acreage— 298.51, all Federal. 



Gulf Islands 
National Seashore 

P.O. Box 100 

Gulf Breeze, FL 32561 

(See also Mississippi) 



Offshore islands and keys have both sparkling white sand beaches and 
historic forts and batteries. Mainland features of this unit, which is located 
near Pensacola, Fla., include the Naval Live Oaks Reservation, beaches, 
and military forts. All areas are accessible by car. 
Authorized Jan. 8, 1971. Boundary change: Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 65,816.64 Federal: 28,975.79 Nonfederal: 36,840.85. 
Land area: 9,366.64. 



Georgia 



Andersonville 
National Historic Site 

Andersonville, GA 31711 



This Civil War prisoner-of-war camp commemorates the sacrifices borne 

by American prisoners not only in the 1861-65 conflict but in all wars. Site 

includes Andersonville National Cemetery which has 1 5,767 interments, 

1,041 unidentified. 

Authorized Oct. 16, 1970. 

Acreage— 478.03 Federal: 453.93 Nonfederal: 24. 10. 



Appalachian 
National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Chattahoochee River 
National Recreation Area 

P.O. Box 1396 
Smyrna, GA 30080 



A series of sites along a 48-mile stretch of the Chattahoochee river, 
extending into Atlanta, will be preserved for public enjoyment of scenic, 
recreational, and historical values. LIMITED FEDERAL FACILITIES. 
Established Aug. 15, 1978. 
Acreage— 8,514.57 Federal: 133.34 Nonfederal: 8,381.23. 



Chickamauga and Chattanooga 
National Military Park 

P.O. Box 2126 

Fort Oglethorpe, GA 30742 

(Also in Tenn.) 



This park includes the Civil War battlefields of Chickamauga, Orchard 
Knob, Lookout Mountain, and Missionary Ridge. 
Established Aug. 19, 1890; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933. 
Boundary changes: Aug 9, 1939; Mar. 5, 1942; June 24, 1948. 
Acreage— 8,098.21 Federal: 8,078.67 (6,228.99 in Ga.; 1,849.68 in 
Tenn.) Nonfederal: 19.54. 



Cumberland Island 
National Seashore 

P.O. Box 806 

St. Marys, GA 31558 



Magnificent and unspoiled beaches and dunes, marshes, and freshwater 
lakes make up this largest of Georgia's Golden Isles. Accessible by tour 
boat only. 

Established Oct. 23, 1972. Boundary change: Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 36,544.85 Federal: 16,333.90 Nonfederal: 20,210.95. 
Land area: 26, 153. 10. 



26 



Fort Frederica 
National Monument 

Route 4, Box 286-C 

St. Simons Island, GA 31522 



Gen. James E. Oglethorpe built this British fort in 1736-48, during the 

Anglo-Spanish struggle for control of what is now southeastern United 

States. 

Authorized May 26, 1936. Boundary changes: Sept. 20, 1950; May 16, 

1958. 

Acreage— 214.52 Federal: 210.72 Nonfederal: 3.80. 



Fort Pulaski 
National Monument 

P.O. Box 98 

Tybee Island, GA 31328 



Bombardment of this early 19th-century fort by Federal rifled cannon in 
1 862 first demonstrated the ineffectiveness of old-style masonry fortifica- 
tions. 

Proclaimed Oct. 15, 1924; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933. 
Boundary changes: June 26, 1936; May 25, 1959. 
Acreage— 5,615.50 Federal: 5,365. 13 Nonfederal: 250.37. 



Kennesaw Mountain 
National Battlefield Park 

P.O. Box 1167 
Marietta, GA 30061 



Two engagements took place here between Union and Confederate 

forces during the Atlanta Campaign, June 20-July 2, 1864. 

Authorized as a national battlefield site Feb. 8, 1917; transferred from 

War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933; changed to national battlefield park June 26, 

1935. Boundary change; Aug. 9, 1939. 

Acreage— 2, 884. 38 Federal: 2, 882. 37 Nonfederal: 2. 1. 



Martin Luther King, Jr. 
National Historic Site 
c/o National Park Service 
75 Spring St., SW 
Atlanta, GA 30303 



The birthplace, church, and grave of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., civil rights 
leader, are parts of this park. The neighborhood also includes the Martin 
Luther King, Jr., Center for Nonviolent Social Change, Inc. The surround- 
ing preservation district includes Sweet Auburn, the economic and cultur- 
al center of Atlanta's black community during most of the 20th century. 
NO FEDERAL FACILITIES but several key sites, run by private organiza- 
tions, are open to the public. 
Established Oct. 10, 1980. 

Acreage— 91 .69, all nonfederal. Preservation district: 68. 19 Historic 
site: 23.50. 



Ocmulgee National Monument 

1207 Emery Hwy. 
Macon, GA 31201 



Traces of 10,000 years of Southeastern Indian prehistory are preserved 
here, including the massive temple mounds of a Mississippian Indian 
ceremonial complex abandoned about 1100 A.D. 
Authorized June 14, 1934. Boundary change: June 13, 1941. 
Acreage— 683.48, all Federal. 



Guam 



War in the Pacific 
National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 3441 
Agana, GU 96910 



This park will provide an opportunity to interpret events in the Pacific 

theater of World War II. It includes major historic sites associated with the 

1944 battle for Guam, an example of the island-hopping military campaign 

against the Japanese. LIMITED FEDERAL FACILITIES. 

Authorized Aug. 18, 1978. 

Acreage— 1,923.06 Federal: 738.76 Nonfederal: 1,184.30. 

Water area: 1,002. 



27 



Hawaii 



Haleakala National Park 

P.O. Box 537 
Makawao, HI 96768 



The park preserves the outstanding features of Haleakala Crater on the 
island of Maui and protects the unique and fragile ecosystems of Kipahulu 
Valley, the scenic pools along Oheo gulch, and many rare and endan- 
gered species. 

Authorized as a part of Hawaii National Park Aug. 1, 1916; redesignated 
Sept. 13, 1960. Boundary changes: Feb. 12, 1927; Jan. 10, 1969; Oct. 21, 
1976. Wilderness designated Oct. 20, 1976. 
Acreage— 28,655.25 Federal: 27,456.34 Nonfederal: 1, 198.91. 
Wilderness area: 19,270. 



Hawaii Volcanoes 
National Park 

Hawaii National Park, HI 96718 



Active volcanism continues here, on the island of Hawaii, where at lower 

elevations luxuriant and often rare vegetation provides food and shelter 

for a variety of animals. 

Established as part of Hawaii National Park Aug. 1, 1916; redesignated 

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Sept. 22, 1961. Boundary changes: May 

1, 1922; Apr. 11, 1928; June 20, 1938; Dec. 3, 1940; July 1, 1961; Nov. 

10, 1978. Wilderness designated Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 229,177.03 Federal: 217,029.61 Nonfederal: 12,147.42. 

Wilderness area: 123, 100. 



Kalaupapa National 
Historical Park 

c/o Pacific Area Office 
National Park Service 
300 Ala Moana Blvd. 
Honolulu, HI 96850 



This park contains the site of the Molokai Island leper colony 

(1886-1969), areas relating to early Hawaiian settlement, scenic and 

geologic resources, and habitats for rare and endangered species. NOT 

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. 

Authorized Dec. 22, 1980. 

Acreage— 10,902 Federal: 23 Nonfederal: 10,879. 

Water area: 2,000. 



Kaloko-Honokohau 
National Historical Park 

c/o State Office 
National Park Service 
Box 50165 
Honolulu, HI 96850 

Pu'uhonua o Honaunau 
National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 128 

Honaunau, Kona, HI 96726 



Park is intended to preserve native culture of Hawaii. This was the site of 
important Hawaiian settlements before arrival of European explorers. It 
includes 3 large fishponds, house sites, and other archeological rem- 
nants. NO FEDERAL FACILITIES. 
Established Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 1,310.79, all Nonfederal. 

Until 1819, vanquished Hawaiian warriors, noncombatants, and kapu 

breakers could escape death by reaching this sacred ground. Prehistoric 

house sites, royal fishponds, coconut groves, and spectacular shore 

scenery comprise the park. 

Authorized as City of Refuge National Historical Park July 26, 1955; name 

changed Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 181.80, all Federal. 



Puukohola Heiau 
National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 4963 
Kawaihae, HI 96743 

USS Arizona Memorial 

c/o Pacific Area Office 
National Park Service 
Box 50165 
Honolulu, HI 96850 



Ruins of Puukohola Heiau ("Temple on the Hill of the Whale"), built by 
King Kamehameha the Great during his rise to power, are preserved. 
Authorized Aug. 17, 1972. 
Acreage— 76.57 Federal: 46.20 Nonfederal: 30.37. 

This floating memorial marks the spot where the USS Arizona was sunk in 

Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941, during the Japanese attack. 

Established Sept. 9, 1980; owned by the U.S. Navy; administered by the 

National Park Service under a cooperative agreement. 

Acreage— None. 



28 



Idaho 



Craters of the Moon 
National Monument 

P.O. Box 29 
Arco, ID 83213 



Nez Perce 

National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 93 
Spalding, ID 83551 



Yellowstone National Park 

(See Wyoming) 



Volcanic cones, craters, lava flows, and caves make this an astonishing 

landscape. 

Proclaimed May 2, 1924. Boundary changes: July 23, 1928; July 9, 1930; 

June 5, 1936; July 18, 1941; Nov. 19, 1962. Wilderness designated 

Oct. 23, 1970. 

Acreage— 53.545.05, all Federal. Wilderness area: 43,243. 

The history and culture of the Nez Perce Indian country are preserved, 
commemorated, and interpreted here. Four federally-owned sites are 
administered by the National Park Service, and 20 sites through coopera- 
tive agreements. 
Authorized May 1 5, 1 965. 
Acreage— 2,109.06 Federal: 1,833.04 Nonfederal: 276.02. 



Illinois 



Lincoln Home 
National Historic Site 

526 S. Seventh St. 
Springfield, IL 62703 



Abraham Lincoln left his house here in 1861 to accept the Presidency. It 

was the only home he ever owned. 

Authorized Aug. 18, 1971. 

Acreage— 12.28 Federal: 11.73 Nonfederal: 0.55. 



Indiana 



George Rogers Clark 
National Historical Park 

401 S. Second St. 
Vincennes, IN 47591 



Indiana Dunes 
National Lakeshore 
R.R. 2, Box 139-A 
Chesterton, IN 46304 



Lincoln Boyhood 
National Memorial 

Lincoln City, IN 47552 



This classic memorial, near the site of old Fort Sackville, commemorates 
the seizure of the fort from the British by Lt. Col. George Rogers Clark, 
Feb. 25, 1779. 
Authorized July 23, 1966. 
Acreage— 24.30, all Federal. 

Magnificent dunes rise as high as 180 feet above Lake Michigan's 
southern shore. Other natural features include beaches, bogs, marshes, 
swamps, and prairie remnants; historic sites include an 1822 homestead 
and 1 900 family farm, both restored. 
Authorized Nov. 5, 1966. Boundary change: Oct. 18, 1976. 
Acreage— 12,534.82 Federal: 6,395.24 Nonfederal: 6,139.58. 

On this southern Indiana farm, Abraham Lincoln grew from youth into 
manhood. His mother, Nancy Hanks Lincoln, is buried here. 
Authorized Feb. 19, 1962. 
Acreage— 197.60 Federal: 168.31 Nonfederal: 34.29. 






29 



Iowa 



Effigy Mounds 
National Monument 

P.O. Box K 
McGregor, I A 52157 

Herbert Hoover 
National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 607 

West Branch, IA 52358 



The monument contains outstanding examples of prehistoric burial 
mounds, some in the shapes of birds and bears. 
Proclaimed Oct. 25, 1949. Boundary change: May 27, 1961. 
Acreage— 1,474.63, all Federal. 

The birthplace, home, and boyhood neighborhood of the 31st President, 

1929-33, the gravesites of President and Mrs. Hoover, and the Hoover 

Presidential Library and Museum, which is administered by the National 

Archives and Records Service, General Services Administration, are 

within the park. 

Authorized Aug. 1 2, 1 965. 

Acreage— 186.80 Federal: 181.11 Nonfederal: 5.69. 



Kansas 



Fort Larned 
National Historic Site 

Route 3 

Larned, KS 67550 



From 1859 to 1878 this fort protected traffic along the Santa Fe Trail, was 

the key military base in the Indian war of 1868-69, and served as an 

Indian agency. 

Authorized Aug. 31, 1964. 

Acreage— 718.39 Federal: 672.39 Nonfederal: 46.00. 



Fort Scott 

National Historic Site 

Old Fort Blvd. 

Fort Scott, KS 66701 



Established in 1842 as a base for the U.S. Army's peace-keeping efforts 
along the "permanent Indian frontier," the fort was manned by the 
colorful U.S. Dragoons who served valiantly in the Mexican War. The post 
was abandoned in 1 853 and reactivated during the Civil War as a supply 
and training center. The restored and reconstructed buildings preserve 
the U.S. frontier of the 1840s and 1850s. 

Established as an affiliated area Aug. 31, 1965; authorized as a National 
Park Service area Oct. 19, 1978; established May 18, 1979. 
Acreage— 16.86, all Federal. 



Kentucky 



Abraham Lincoln Birthplace 
National Historic Site 

R.F.D. 1 

Hodgenville, KY 42748 



An early 19th-century Kentucky cabin, symbolic of the one in which 

Lincoln was born, is preserved in a memorial building at the site of his 

birth. 

Established as Abraham Lincoln National Park July 17, 1916; transferred 

from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933; changed to Abraham Lincoln National 

Historical Park Aug. 11, 1939; changed to Abraham Lincoln Birthplace 

National Historic Site Sept. 8, 1 959. Boundary changes: May 27, 1 949; 

Apr. 11, 1972. 

Acreage— 1 16.50, all Federal. 



Big South Fork National River 
and Recreation Area 

(See Tennessee) 



30 



Cumberland Gap 
National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 840 

Middlesboro, KY 40965 

(Also in Virginia and Tennessee) 



This mountain pass on the Wilderness Road, explored by Daniel Boone, 

developed into a main artery of the great trans-Allegheny migration for 

settlement of "the Old West" and an important military objective in the 

Revolutionary and Civil Wars. 

Authorized June 11, 1940. Boundary changes: July 26, 1961; Oct. 26, 

1974. 

Acreage— 20,273.04 Federal: 20,270.06 (10,731.34 in Ky.; 7,526.01 in 

Va.; 2, 012.71 in Tenn.) Nonfederal: 2 98. 



Mammoth Cave National Park 

Mammoth Cave, KY 42259 



This series of underground passages— with beautiful limestone gypsum, 
and travertine formations, deep pits and high domes, and an underground 
river— has been explored and mapped for 194 miles, making this the 
longest recorded cave system in the world. 

Authorized May 25, 1926; fully established July 1, 1941. Boundary 
changes: May 14, 1934; Aug. 28, 1937; Dec. 3, 1940; June 5, 1942. 
Acreage— 52, 128.92 Federal: 51,303.62 Nonfederal: 825.30. 



Louisiana 



Jean Lafitte 

National Historical Park 

and Preserve 

400 Royal St., Room 200 
New Orleans, LA 70130 



The park preserves significant examples of natural and historical re- 
sources of the Mississippi Delta. The Chalmette Unit, where American 
forces were victorious in the Battle of New Orleans in the War of 1812, 
contains the Chalmette National Cemetery. The French Quarter Unit 
provides an introduction to the culture of the Mississippi Delta Region and 
includes a visitor center on Jackson Square. The Barrataria Unit, 15 miles 
south of New Orleans, focuses on the ecology of the Mississippi River 
Delta. 

Chalmette Unit established as Chalmette Monument and Grounds March 
4, 1907; transferred from War Department Aug. 10, 1933; established as 
Chalmette National Historical Park, Aug. 10, 1939. Redesignated and 
incorporated with other units, Nov. 10, 1978. New park authorized Nov. 
10, 1978. 
Acreage— 20,000 Federal: 141.72 Nonfederal: 19,858.28. 



Maine 



Acadia National Park 

Route 1 , Box 1 

Bar Harbor, ME 04609 



Appalachian 
National Scenic Trail 

P.O. Box 236 

Harpers Ferry, WV 25425 



The sea sets the mood here, uniting the rugged coastal area of Mount 
Desert Island (highest elevation on the eastern seaboard), picturesque 
Schoodic Peninsula on the mainland, and the spectacular cliffs of Isle au 
Haut. 

Proclaimed as Sieur de Monts National Monument July 8, 1916; estab- 
lished as Lafayette National Park Feb. 26, 1919; changed to Acadia 
National Park Jan. 19, 1929. Boundary changes: Jan. 19, 1929; May 23, 
1930; May 29, 1935; Aug. 24, 1935; June 6, 1942; Dec. 22, 1944; July 30, 
1947; Sept. 7, 1949; Aug. 1, 1950; July 24, 1956; Oct. 3, 1966; Mar. 4, 
1968; Mar. 12, 1968. 
Acreage— 38,523.77 Federal: 37,930.23 Nonfederal: 593.54. 

Approximately 2,000 miles of this scenic trail follow the Appalachian 
Mountains from Mount Katahdin, Maine, through N.H., Vt., Mass., Conn., 
N.Y., N.J., Pa., Md., W. Va., Va., Tenn., and N.C., to Springer Mountain, 
Ga. The trail is one of the two initial units of the National Trail System. 
Established Oct. 2, 1968. 
Acreage— 52,034 Federal: 34, 190 Nonfederal: 17,844. 



31 



Saint Croix Island 
National Monument 

c/o Acadia National Park 

Route 1 , Box 1 

Bar Harbor, ME 04609 



The attempted French settlement of 1604, which led to the founding ol 
New France, is commemorated on Saint Croix Island in the Saint Croi> 
River on the Canadian border. NO FEDERAL FACILITIES. 
Authorized June 8, 1949. 
Acreage— 35.39 Federal: 22. 19 Nonfederal: 13.20. 



Maryland 



Antietam 
National Battlefield 

Box 158 

Sharpsburg, MD 21782 



Gen. Robert E. Lee's first invasion of the North was ended on this 

battlefield in 1862. 

Antietam (Sharpsburg) National Cemetery— 5,032 interments, 1,836 un 

identified— adjoins the park; grave space is not available. 

Park: Established Aug. 30, 1890; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10 

1933. Boundary changes: May 14, 1940; Apr. 22, 1960; May 31, 1963 

Nov. 10, 1978. Cemetery: Probable date of Civil War interments 1862 

Placed under War Dept. July 1 4, 1 870; transferred from War Departmen 

Aug. 10, 1933. 

Acreage— 3,300.00 Federal: 1,298.44 Nonfederal: 2,001.56. 

Cemetery acreage: 1 1.36, all Federal. 



Appalachian 
National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Assateague Island 
National Seashore 

Route 2, Box 294 
Berlin, MD 21811 
(Also in Virginia) 



This 37-mile barrier island, with sandy beach, migratory waterfowl, anc 
wild ponies, includes 9,021 -acre Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge 
administered by the Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Dept. of the Interior. 
Authorized Sept. 21, 1965. 

Acreage— 39,630.93 Federal: 17,377.25 (6,897.63 in Md; 10,479.62 ii\ 
Va.) Nonfederal: 22,253.68 Land area: 1 5,977.67. 



Catoctin Mountain Park 

Thurmont, MD 21788 



Part of the forested ridge that forms the eastern rampart of the Appala 

chian Mountains in Maryland, this mountain park has sparkling stream! 

and panoramic vistas of the Monocacy Valley. 

Catoctin Recreation Demonstration Area transferred from Resettlemen 

Administration Nov. 1 4, 1 936; changed to Catoctin Mountain Park July 1 2 

1954. Boundary change: July 12, 1954. 

Acreage— 5,768.90, all Federal. 



Chesapeake and Ohio Canal 
National Historical Park 

Box 158 

Sharpsburg, MD 21782 
(Also in the District of 
Columbia and West Virginia) 



The park follows the route of the 184-mile canal along the Potomac Rive 

between Washington, D.C., and Cumberland, Md. The canal was buil 

between 1828 and 1850. 

Placed under National Park Service Sept. 23, 1938; appropriation! 

authorized Aug. 7, 1946; proclaimed Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Nation 

al Monument Jan. 18, 1961; changed to national historical park Jan. 8 

1971. Boundary change: Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 20,781.00 Federal: 13,266.85 (13,166.81 in Md.; 96.64 h 

D.C.; 3.40 in W. Va.) Nonfederal: 7,514. 15. 



Clara Barton 
National Historic Site 

5801 Oxford Rd. 
Glen Echo, MD 20768 



This 38-room home of the founder of the American Red Cross was for 
years headquarters of that organization. 
Authorized Oct. 26, 1974. 
Acreage— 8.59, all Federal. 



32 



: ort McHenry 

National Monument and 

-listoric Shrine 

3altimore, MD 21230 



Successful defense of this fort in the War of 1812, Sept 13-14, 1814, 
inspired Francis Scott Key to write "The Star Spangled Banner." 
Authorized as Fort McHenry National Park Mar. 3, 1925; transferred from 
War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933; redesignated Aug. 11, 1939. Boundary change: 
June 5, 1936. 
Acreage— 43.26, all Federal. 



: ort Washington Park 

National Capital Parks, East 
>210 Indian Head Hwy 
Dxon Hill, MD 20021 



This fort across the Potomac from Mt. Vernon, built to protect Washing- 
ton, D.C., was begun in 1814 to replace an 1809 fort destroyed by the 
British. Recreational facilities are included in the park. 
Transfer from the War Dept. authorized May 29,1930, effective in 1940. 
Acreage— 341.00, all Federal. 



eorge Washington 
Memorial Parkway 

See Virginia) 



Greenbelt Park 

B501 Greenbelt Rd. 
Greenbelt, MD 20770 



Just 12 miles from Washington, D.C. this woodland park offers urban 
dwellers access to many forms of outdoor recreation. 
Transferred from Public Housing Authority, Aug. 3, 1950. 
Acreage— 1, 166.56, all Federal. 



Hampton 

National Historic Site 

535 Hampton Lane 
Towson, MD 21204 



This is a fine example of the lavish Georgian mansions built in America 

during the latter part of the 1 8th century. 

Designated June 22, 1948. Boundary changes: Dec. 23, 1953; Nov. 10, 

1978. 

Acreage— 59.44 Federal: 45.42 Nonfederal: 14.02. 



Harpers Ferry 
National Historical Park 
(See West Virginia) 



Monocacy 
National Battlefield 

c/o Antietam National 
Battlefield, Box 158 
Sharpsburg, MD 21782 



In a battle here July 9, 1864, Confederate Gen. Jubal T. Early defeated 
Union forces commanded by Brig. Gen. Lew Wallace. Wallace's troops 
delayed Early, however, enabling Union forces to marshal a successful 
defense of Washington, D.C. NO FEDERAL FACILITIES. 
Authorized as Monocacy National Military Park, June 21, 1934. Law 
required land purchase by private funds. Federal purchase authorized and 
name changed, Oct. 21, 1976. Boundary change: Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 1,220.31, all Nonfederal. 



National Capital Parks 
(See District of Columbia) 



Piscataway Park 

National Capital Parks, East 
5210 Indian Head Hwy. 
Oxon Hill, MD 20021 



The tranquil view from Mount Vernon of the Maryland shore of the 
Potomac is preserved as a pilot project in the use of easements to protect 
parklands from obtrusive urban expansion. 

Authorized Oct. 4, 1961. Boundary changes: July 19, 1966; Oct. 21, 1976. 
Acreage— 4,21 7. 53 Federal: 3, 690. 1 1 Nonfederal: 527. 42. 



Thomas Stone 
National Historic Site 

c/o George Washington 
Birthplace National Monument 
Washington's Birthplace, VA 22575 



"Habre-de- Venture," a Georgian Mansion built in 1771 near Port Tobac- 
co, Md., was the home of Thomas Stone, 1771-87. A Signer of the 
Declaration of Independence, Stone was a delegate to the Continental 
Congress, 1775-78 and 1783-84. NOT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. 
Authorized Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 322.37, all Nonfederal. 



33 



Massachusetts 



Adams National Historic Site 

1 35 Adams St. 
Quincy, MA 02269 



The home of Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams, of U.S., 
Minister to Great Britain Charles Francis Adams, and of the writers and 
historians Henry Adams and Brooks Adams, this house at 135 Adams 
Street reflects the influence of each of these distinguished men. The park 
also includes the birthplaces of the two presidents and the United First 
Parish Church, built by the Adams family. 

Designated as Adams Mansion National Historic Site Dec. 9, 1946; 
changed to Adams National Historic Site Nov. 26, 1952. Boundary 
changes: Nov. 26, 1952; Apr. 11, 1972; Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 9. 17 Federal: 8.45 Nonfederal: 0.72. 



Appalachian 
National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Boston National 
Historical Park 

Charlestown Navy Yard 
Boston, MA 02129 



This park includes Faneuil Hall, Old North Church, Old State House, 

Bunker Hill, Old South Meeting House, Charlestown Navy Yard, berth for 

USS Constitution, Paul Revere House, and Dorchester Heights. 

Authorized Oct. 26, 1974. Boundary changes: Nov. 10, 1978; Sept. 8, 

1980. 

Acreage— 40.17 Federal: 28.64 Nonfederal: 11.53. 



Cape Cod National Seashore 

South Wellfleet, MA 02663 



Ocean beaches, dunes, woodlands, freshwater ponds, and marshes 

make up this park on outer Cape Cod. The area preserves notable 

examples of Cape Cod homes, an architectural style developed in 

America. 

Authorized Aug. 7, 1961. Boundary change: Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 44,596.43 Federal: 25,929.98 Nonfederal: 18,666.45. Land 

area: 27,004.00. 



Frederick Law Olmsted 
National Historic Site 

99 Warren St. 
Brookline, MA 02146 



The great conservationist, landscape architect, and founder of city plan- 
ning lived and worked here at "Fairstead." An archival collection of more 
than 63,000 original photographs with 150,000 drawings and plans is 
housed at the site. 
Authorized Oct. 12, 1979. 
■1.75, all Federal. 



John Fitzgerald Kennedy 
National Historic Site 

83 Beals St. 
Brookline MA 02146 



This house is the birthplace and early boyhood home of the 35th 

President. 

Authorized May 26, 1 967. 

Acreage— 0.09, all Federal. 



Longfellow 
National Historic Site 

105 Brattle St. 
Cambridge, MA 02138 



Poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow lived here from 1837 to 1882 while 
teaching at Harvard. The house had been General Washington's head- 
quarters during the siege of Boston, 1 775-76. 
Authorized Oct. 9, 1 972. 
Acreage— 1.98, all Federal. 



Lowell 

National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 1098 
Lowell, MA 01853 



America's first planned industrial community is commemorated by this 
park at the heart of the city. Elements of Lowell's factories, canal system, 
and the lifestyle of its people will be preserved and interpreted here. 
Authorized June 5, 1 978. 
Acreage— 137.08 Federal: 79 Nonfederal: 136.29. 



34 



Minute Man 

National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 160 
Concord, MA 01742 



Scene of the fighting on Apr. 19, 1775, that opened the American 

Revolution, the park includes North Bridge, Minute Man statue, 4 miles of 

Battle Road between Lexington and Concord, and "The Wayside," 

Nathaniel Hawthorne's home. 

Designated as national historic site Apr. 14, 1959; changed to national 

historical park Sept. 21, 1959. 

Acreage— 745.37 Federal: 693.01 Nonfederal: 52.36. 



Salem Maritime 
National Historic Site 

Custom House 
174 Derby St. 
Salem, MA 01970 



Structures preserved here date from the era when Salem ships opened 

trade with ports of the Far East. Structures of maritime significance 

include the Custom House where Nathaniel Hawthorne worked, Derby 

Wharf, the Bonded Warehouse, and the West India Goods Store. 

Designated Mar. 17, 1938. Boundary changes: Dec. 12, 1963; Nov. 10, 

1978. 

Acreage— 8.95 Federal: 8.80 Nonfederal: 0. 15. 



Saugus Iron Works 
National Historic Site 

244 Central St. 
Saugus, MA 01906 



This reconstruction of the first integrated iron works in North America, 

begun in 1646, includes the ironworks, furnace, forge, and rolling and 

slitting mill. 

Authorized Apr. 5, 1968. 

Acreage— 8.51 , all Federal. 



Springfield Armory 
National Historic Site 

1 Armory Square 
Springfield, MA 01105 



From 1 794 to 1 968 Springfield Armory was a center for the manufacture 

of U.S. military small arms and the scene of many important technological 

advances. A large weapons museum is now housed in the original Main 

Arsenal Building. 

Authorized Oct. 26, 1974. 

Acreage— 54.93 Federal: 18.35 Nonfederal: 36.58. 



Michigan 



Isle Royale National Park 

87 North Ripley St. 
Houghton, Ml 49931 



The largest in Lake Superior, this forested island is also distinguished for 
its wilderness character, timber wolves and moose herd, and pre-Colum- 
bian copper mines. 

Authorized Mar. 3, 1931. Boundary changes: May 28, 1934; June 20, 
1938; Mar. 6, 1942; Aug. 14, 1958; Apr. 11, 1972; Oct. 20, 1976. 
Wilderness designated Oct. 20, 1976. 

Acreage— 571,796.18 Federal: 539,287.94 Nonfederal: 32,508.24 
Land area: 133,779.94 Wilderness area: 131,880. 



Pictured Rocks 
National Lakeshore 

P.O. Box 40 
Munising, Ml 49862 



Multicolored sandstone cliffs, broad beaches, sand bars, dunes, water- 
falls, inland lakes, ponds, marshes, hardwood and coniferous forests, and 
numerous birds and animals comprise this scenic area on Lake Superior. 
This was the first national lakeshore. 
Authorized Oct. 15, 1966. 

Acreage— 70,807.08 Federal: 35,424. 15 Nonfederal: 35,382.93. 
Land area: 63, 122.08. 



Sleeping Bear Dunes 
National Lakeshore 

400 Main St. 
Frankfort, Ml 49635 



Beaches, massive sand dunes, forests, and lakes are outstanding charac- 
teristics of the Lake Michigan shoreline and two offshore islands. 
Authorized Oct. 21, 1970. 

Acreage— 71, 105.00 Federal: 36,769.59 Nonfederal: 34,335.41. 
Land area: 58,473.00. 



35 



Minnesota 



Grand Portage 
National Monument 

P.O. Box 666 

Grand Marais, MN 55604 



This 9-mile portage was a rendezvous for traders and trappers on a 

principal route of Indians, explorers, missionaries, and fur traders into the 

Northwest. The Grand Portage post of the North West Company has 

been reconstructed here. 

Designated as a national historic site Sept. 15, 1951; changed to national 

monument by act of Congress Sept. 2, 1 958. 

Acreage— 709.97, all Federal. 



Lower St. Croix 
National Scenic Riverway 

(See Wisconsin) 



Pipestone National Monument 

P.O. Box 727 
Pipestone, MN 56164 



From this quarry Indians obtained materials for making pipes used in 

ceremonies. 

Established Aug. 25, 1937. Boundary change: June 18, 1956. 

Acreage— 281 .78, all Federal. 



St. Croix 

National Scenic Riverway 

(See Wisconsin) 



Voyageurs National Park 

P.O. Box 50 

International Falls, MN 56649 



Beautiful northern lakes, once the route of the French-Canadian voya- 
geurs, are surrounded by forest in this land where geology and history 
capture your imagination. 

Authorized Jan. 8, 1971. Established Apr. 8, 1975. 
Acreage— 219,128.00 Federal: 125,296.81 Nonfederal: 93,831.19. 
Land area: 138,828. 



Mississippi 



Brices Cross Roads 
National Battlefield Site 

c/o Natchez Trace Parkway 
R.R. 1, NT-143 
Tupelo, MS 38801 



The Confederate cavalry was employed with extraordinary skill here 
during the battle of June 10, 1864. 

Established Feb. 21, 1929; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933. 
Acreage— 1.00, all Federal. 



Gulf Islands 
National Seashore 

P.O. Box T 

Ocean Springs, MS 39564 

(See also Florida) 



Sparkling beaches, historic ruins, and wildlife sanctuaries, accessible only 
by boat, can be found on the offshore islands of this unit, located near 
Pascagoula and Biloxi, Miss. On the mainland there's an urban park with 
a nature trail, picnic area, and a campground at Ocean Springs. 
Authorized Jan. 8, 1971. Boundary change: Nov. 10, 1978. Wilderness 
designated Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 73,958.82 Federal: 69,150.03 Nonfederal: 4,808.79 Wil- 
derness area: 1,800. Land area: 10,078.82. 



Natchez Trace Parkway 

R.R. 1, NT-143 
Tupelo, MS 38801 
(Also in Alabama and 
Tennessee) 



This historic route generally follows the old Indian trace, or trail, between 
Nashville, Tenn., and Natchez, Miss. (Of the estimated 449 miles, 358 are 
completed.) 

Emergency Appropriation Act of June 19, 1934, allocated initial construc- 
tion funds; established as parkway under National Park Service by act of 
May 18, 1938. Ackia Battleground (authorized as a national monument 
Aug. 27, 1935, and now called Chickasaw Village) and Meriwether Lewis 
Park (proclaimed as a national monument Feb. 6, 1 925, and transferred 



36 



from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933) were disestablished and added to the 
Natchez Trace Parkway by act of Aug. 10, 1961. 

Acreage— 48,370.78 Federal: 47,881.58 (35,854.09 in Miss.; 7,851.52 in 
Tenn.; 4, 1 75. 97 in Ala.) Nonfederal: 489.20. 



Tupelo National Battlefield 

c/o Natchez Trace Parkway 
R.R. 1, NT-143 
Tupelo, MS 38801 



Vicksburg 

National Military Park 

P.O. Box 349 
Vicksburg, MS 39180 



Here, on July 13-14, 1864, Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest's cavalry 
battled a Union force of 14,000 sent to keep Forrest from cutting the 
railroad supplying Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman's march on Atlanta. 
Established as a national battlefield site Feb. 21, 1929; transferred from 
War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933; changed to national battlefield and boundary 
changed Aug. 10, 1961. 
Acreage— 1.00, all Federal. 

Fortifications of the 47-day siege of Vicksburg, which ended July 3, 1863, 

are remarkably well preserved here. Victory gave the North control of the 

Mississippi River and cut the Confederacy in two. Civil War gunboat USS 

Cairo and artifacts are on display. 

Vicksburg National Cemetery— 18,207 interments, 12,954 unidentified — 

adjoins the park; grave space is not available. 

Park: Established Feb. 21, 1899; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 

1933. Boundary change: June 4, 1963. Cemetery: Probable date of Civil 

War interments, 1865. Transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933. 

Boundary change: Mar. 2, 1955. 

Park acreage— 1, 740. 78 Federal: 1,611.16 Nonfederal: 129. 62 

Cemetery acreage— 1 16.28, all Federal. 



Missouri 



George Washington Carver 
National Monument 

P.O. Box 38 
Diamond, MO 64840 



Jefferson 

National Expansion Memorial 

National Historic Site 

1 1 North 4th St. 
St. Louis, MO 63102 



Ozark 

National Scenic Riverways 

P.O. Box 490 

Van Buren, MO 63965 



Wilson's Creek 
National Battlefield 

Rt. 2, Box 75 
Republic, MO 65738 



Existing landmarks at the birthplace and childhood home of the famous 
black agronomist include a spring, a grove of trees, and the graves of the 
Moses Carver family. 
Authorized July 14, 1943. 
Acreage— 210.00, all Federal. 

This park on St. Louis' Mississippi riverfront memorializes Thomas Jeffer- 
son and others who directed territorial expansion of the United States. 
Eero Saarinen's price-winning, stainless steel gateway arch commemo- 
rates westward pioneers. Visitors may ascend the 630-foot-high arch. In 
the nearby courthouse Dred Scott sued for freedom in the historic slavery 
case. 

Designated Dec. 20, 1935; authorized May 17, 1954. 
Boundary change: Aug. 29, 1969. 
Acreage— 90.96, all Federal. 

For about 140 miles the Current and Jacks Fork Rivers flow through a 
quiet world of nature. Notable features include huge freshwater springs 
and numerous caves. 

Authorized Aug. 27, 1964. Boundary change: Apr. 11, 1972. 
Acreage— 79, 587. 00 Federal: 60, 739.28 Nonfederal: 18, 847. 72. 

The Confederate victory here on Aug. 10, 1861, was the first major 
engagement west of the Mississippi. It culminated in severe losses on 
both sides, yet Union troops were able to retreat and regroup. 
Authorized Apr. 22, 1 960, as national battlefield park; name changed Dec. 
16, 1970. 
Acreage— 1, 749. 9 1 Federal: 1, 749. 4 1 Nonfederal: 0. 50. 



37 



Montana 



Big Hole 

National Battlefield 

P.O. Box 237 
Wisdon, MT 59761 



Nez Perce Indians and U.S. Army troops fought here in 1877— a dramatic 
episode in the long struggle to confine the Nez Perce, and other Indians, 
to reservations. 

Established by Executive Order as Big Hole Battlefield National Monu- 
ment June 23, 1910; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933; changed 
to Big Hole National Battlefield May 17, 1963. Boundary changes: June 
29, 1939; May 17, 1963; Dec. 1, 1971. 
Acreage— 655.61 , all Federal. 



Bighorn Canyon 
National Recreation Area 

P.O. Box 458 

Fort Smith, MT 59035 

(Also in Wyoming) 



Bighorn Lake, formed by Yellowtail Dam on the Bighorn River, extends 71 

miles, including 47 miles through spectacular Bighorn Canyon. The Crow 

Indian Reservation borders a large part of the area. 

Administered under cooperative agreement with Bureau of Reclamation, 

U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Dec. 31, 1964; established by act of Congress 

Oct. 15, 1966. 

Acreage— 120, 157.88 Federal: 65,617.48 (34,878.80 in Mont; 

30, 738. 68 in Wyo.) Nonfederal: 54, 540. 40. 



Custer Battlefield 
National Monument 

P.O. Box 39 

Crow Agency, MT 59022 



The famous Battle of the Little Big Horn between twelve companies of the 
7th U.S. Cavalry and the Sioux and Northern Cheyenne Indians was 
fought here on June 25-26, 1876. Lt. Col. George A. Custer and about 
268 of his force were killed. Custer Battlefield National Cemetery with 
4,487 interments, 277 unidentified, is included within the park. 
Ordered established as a national cemetery by Secretary of War Jan. 29, 
1879; proclaimed National Cemetery of Custer's Battlefield Reservation 
Dec. 7, 1886; transferred from War Dept. July 1, 1940; changed to Custer 
Battlefield National Monument by act of Congress Mar. 22, 1 946. Bound- 
ary change: Apr. 14, 1926. 
Acreage— 765.34, all Federal. 



Fort Benton 

c/o Rocky Mountain 
Regional Office, 
National Park Service 
P.O. Box 25287 
Denver, CO 80225 



Founded in 1846, this American Fur Company trading post was an 
important river port from 1859 through the Montana gold rush of 1862 
until rail service surpassed river cargo transport. NO FEDERAL FACILI- 
TIES. 

Authorized Oct. 1 6, 1 976. National Park Service to operate visitor facilities 
in Fort Benton as part of Missouri Breaks Wild and Scenic River, 
administered by Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Dept. of the Interior. 



Fort Union Trading Post 
National Historic Site 

(See North Dakota) 



Glacier National Park 

West Glacier, MT 59936 



With precipitous peaks ranging above 1 0,000 feet, this ruggedly beautiful 

land includes nearly 50 glaciers, many lakes and streams, a wide variety 

of wildflowers, and wildlife such as bighorn sheep, bald eagles, and grizzly 

bears. 

Established May 11, 1910. Boundary changes: Feb. 10, 1912; Feb. 27, 

1915; July 31, 1939; Dec. 13, 1944; Apr. 11, 1972. Authorized as part of 

Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park May 2, 1932; proclaimed June 

30, 1932. 

Acreage— 1, 13, 594. 67 Federal: 1, 12, 669.25 Nonfederal: 925. 42. 



Grant-Kohrs Ranch 
National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 790 

Deer Lodge, MT 59722 



This was the home ranch area of one of the largest and best known 

1 9th-century range ranches in the country. 

Authorized Aug. 25, 1972. 

Acreage— 1 ,527.90 Federal: 1,322.48 Nonfederal: 205.42. 



Yellowstone National Park 

(See Wyoming) 



38 



Nebraska 



Agate Fossil Beds 
National Monument 

P.O. Box 427 
Gering, NE 69341 



These renowned quarries contain numerous, well-preserved Miocene 

mammal fossils and represent an important chapter in the evolution of 

mammals. 

Authorized June 5, 1965. 

Acreage— 3,055.22 Federal: 2,737.52 Nonfederal: 317.70. 



Homestead 

National Monument of America 

Route 3 

Beatrice, NE 68310 



One of the first claims under the Homestead Act of 1 862 was filed for this 
land; includes Freeman School. 

Authorized Mar. 19, 1936. Boundary change: Sept. 25, 1970. 
Acreage— 194.57 Federal: 182.11 Nonfederal: 12.46. 



Scotts Bluff 
National Monument 

P.O. Box 427 
Gering, NE 69341 



Rising 800 feet above the valley floor, this massive promontory was a 
landmark on the Oregon Trail, associated with overland migration be- 
tween 1 843 and 1 869 across the Great Plains. 

Proclaimed Dec. 12, 1919. Boundary changes: May 9, 1924; June 1, 
1932; Mar. 29, 1940; June 30, 1961. 
Acreage— 2,987.97 Federal: 2, 720.80 Nonfederal: 267 17. 



Nevada 



Death Valley 
National Monument 

(See California) 



Lake Mead 

National Recreation Area 

601 Nevada Hwy. 
Boulder City, NV 89005 
(Also in Arizona) 



Lake Mead, formed by Hoover Dam, and Lake Mohave, by Davis Dam, on 
the Colorado River comprise this first national recreation area established 
by an act of Congress. Administered under cooperative agreements with 
Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Oct. 13, 1936, and July 
18, 1947. Name changed from Boulder Dam National Recreation Area 
Aug. 11, 1947. Established Oct. 8, 1964. Boundary change: Jan. 3, 1975. 
Acreage— 1,496,600.52 Federal: 1,482,305.67 (896,299.89 in Ariz.; 
586, 005. 78 in Nev.) Nonfederal: 14,294. 85. Land area: 1, 348, 075 70. 



Lehman Caves 
National Monument 

Baker, NV 8931 1 



Tunnels and galleries decorated with stalactites and stalagmites honey- 
comb these caverns of light-gray and white marble. 
Proclaimed Jan. 24, 1922; transferred from Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of 
Agriculture, Aug. 10, 1933. 
Acreage— 640.00, all Federal. 



New Hampshire 

Appalachian 
National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Saint-Gaudens 
National Historic Site 

R.D. 2 

Windsor, VT 05089 



Located in Cornish this memorial to sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens 

contains his home, "Aspet," and his studios and gardens. 

Authorized Aug. 31, 1964. Established May 30, 1977. Boundary change: 

Oct. 21, 1976. 

Acreage— 149.31 Federal: 86.00 Nonfederal: 63.31. 



39 



New Jersey 

Appalachian 
National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 

Delaware National Scenic River 

(See Pennsylvania) 

Delaware Water Gap 
National Recreation Area 

(See Pennsylvania) 

Edison 

National Historic Site 

Main St. and Lakeside Ave. 
West Orange, NJ 07052 



Gateway 

National Recreation Area 

P.O. Box 437 
Highlands, NJ 07732 
(See also New York) 



Morristown 

National Historical Park 

Washington Place 
Morristown, NJ 07960 



Statue of Liberty 
National Monument 

(See New York) 



Laboratory and equipment used for 44 years by Thomas A. Edison for 
many of his experiments are here, as are his library, papers, and models 
of some of his inventions. The site also includes Glenmont, Edison's 
23-room home, with original furnishings. 

Edison Home National Historic Site designated Dec. 6, 1955; Edison 
Laboratory National Monument proclaimed July 14, 1956; areas com- 
bined as Edison National Historic Site Sept. 5, 1 962. Boundary changes: 
Sept. 5, 1962; Oct. 21, 1976. 
Acreage— 21.35 Federal: 19.96 Nonfederal: 1.39. 

The narrow Sandy Hook peninsula offers bathing beaches, interesting 
plant and animal life, and historic structures, including Fort Hancock and 
the Sandy Hook Lighthouse, reputed to be the oldest operational light- 
house in the United States (1764). 
Established Oct. 27, 1972. 
Acreage— 4,675 Federal: 1,713 Nonfederal: 2,962. 

During the Revolutionary War, Morristown was quarters for the Continen- 
tal Army during two critical winters. Ford Mansion, which served as 
George Washington's headquarters, is included in the park. 
Authorized Mar. 2, 1933. Boundary changes: June 6, 1953; Sept. 18, 
1964; Oct. 26, 1974; Oct. 21, 1976. 
Acreage— 1, 677. 18 Federal: 1, 673. 42 Nonfederal: 3. 76. 



New Mexico 



Aztec Ruins 
National Monument 

P.O. Box U 
Aztec, NM 87410 



Bandelier National Monument 

Los Alamos, NM 87544 



Ruins of this large Pueblo Indian community of 12th-century masonry and 
timber buildings have been largely excavated and stabilized. The ruins, 
misnamed by settlers, are unrelated to the Aztecs of Mexico. 
Proclaimed Jan. 24, 1923. Boundary changes: July 2, 1928; Dec. 19, 
1930; May 27, 1948. 
Acreage— 27. 14, all Federal. 

On the canyon-slashed slopes of the Pajarito Plateau are the ruins of 
many cliff houses of 1 5th-century Pueblo Indians. 
Proclaimed Feb. 11, 1916; transferred from Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of 
Agriculture, Feb. 25, 1932. Boundary changes: Feb. 25, 1932; Jan. 9, 
1961; May 27, 1963; Oct. 21, 1976. Wilderness designated Oct. 20, 1976. 
Acreage— 36,971.20 Federal: 32,737.20 Nonfederal: 4,234.00. Wilder- 
ness area: 23,267. 



Capulin Mountain 
National Monument 

Capulin, NM 88414 



This symmetrical cinder cone is an interesting example of a geologically 
recent, extinct volcano. 

Proclaimed Aug. 9, 1916. Boundary change: Sept. 3, 1962. 
Acreage— 775.38, all Federal. 



40 



Carlsbad Caverns 
National Park 

3225 National Parks Hwy. 
Carlsbad, NM 88220 



Chaco Culture 
National Historical Park 

Star Route 4, Box 6500 
Bloomfield, NM 87413 



El Morro National Monument 

Ramah, NM 87321 



Fort Union National Monument 

Watrous, NM 87753 






This series of connected caverns, the largest underground chambers yet 
discovered, has countless magnificent and curious formations. 
Proclaimed Carlsbad Cave National Monument Oct. 25, 1 923; established 
as Carlsbad Caverns National Park May 14, 1930. Boundary changes: 
Feb. 21, 1933; May 4, 1934; Feb. 3, 1939; Dec. 30, 1963. Wilderness 
designated Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 46,755.33 Federal: 46,435.33 Nonfederal: 320.00 
Wilderness area: 33, 125. 

The canyon, with hundreds of smaller ruins, contains 13 major Indian 
ruins unsurpassed in the United States, representing the highest point of 
Pueblo pre-Columbian civilization. 

Proclaimed Chaco Canyon National Monument Mar. 11,1 907; redesig- 
nated a national historical park, Dec. 1 9, 1 980. Boundary changes: Jan. 
10, 1928; Dec. 19, 1980. 
Acreage— 33,989 Federal: 21,149.35 Nonfederal: 12,839.65. 

"Inscription Rock" is a soft sandstone monolith on which are carved 
hundreds of inscriptions, including those of 1 7th-century Spanish explor- 
ers and 19th-century American emigrants and settlers. The monument 
also includes pre-Columbian petroglyphs. 

Proclaimed Dec. 8, 1906. Boundary changes: June 18, 1917; June 14, 
1950. 
Acreage— 1,278. 72 Federal: 1, 039. 92 Nonfederal: 238. 80. 

Three U.S. Army forts were built on this site— a key defensive point on the 

Santa Fe Trail— and were occupied from 1851 to 1891. Ruins of the last 

fort, which was the largest military post in the Southwest, have been 

stabilized. 

Established June 28, 1954. 

Acreage— 720.60, all Federal. 



Georgia O'Keeffe 
National Historic Site 

c/o Southwest Regional Office 
National Park Service 
P.O. Box 728 
Santa Fe, NM 87501 



Located in Abiquiu, the site includes the home and studio of world 
renowned artist Georgia O'Keeffe. NOT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. 
Authorized Sept. 8, 1 980. 
Acreage— None. 



Gila Cliff Dwellings 
National Monument 

Gila Hot Springs Route 1 1 

Box 100 

Silver City, NM 88061 



Pecos National Monument 

P.O. Drawer 1 1 
Pecos, NM 87552 



These well-preserved cliff dwellings in natural cavities on the face of an 

overhanging cliff were inhabited from about A.D. 100 to 1300. 

Proclaimed Nov. 16, 1907; transferred from Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of 

Agriculture, Aug. 10, 1933. Boundary change: Apr. 17, 1962. Forest 

Service resumed administration of National Park Service area April 28, 

1975. 

Acreage— 533. 13, all Federal. 

Foundations of a 17th-century mission, ruins of an 18th-century church, 
ancient pueblo structural remains, and restored kivas comprise the park. 
This site was once a landmark on the Santa Fe Trail, ruts of which are still 
in existence. 

Authorized June 28, 1965. Boundary change: Oct. 21, 1976. 
Acreage— 364.80, all Federal. 



Salinas National Monument 

Route 1 

Mountainair, NM 87036 



The site contains the archeological remains of a settlement that once 
housed some 2,000 Pueblo Indians as well as two 17th-century Francis- 
can missions. 

Proclaimed Gran Quivira National Monument Nov. 1, 1909; name 
changed, area enlarged, and two State monuments absorbed Dec. 19, 
1980. Boundary change: Nov. 25, 1919. 
Acreage— 1, 079. 94 Federal: 610.94 Nonfederal: 469. 



41 



White Sands 
National Monument 

P.O. Box 458 
Alamogordo, NM 88310 



The park contains the world's largest gypsum dunefield covering nearly 

230 square miles. The glistening white dunes rise 60 feet high. Small 

animals have adapted to this harsh environment by developing light, 

protective coloration. Plants also have adapted, extending root systems 

to remain atop the ever-shifting dunes. 

Proclaimed Jan. 18, 1933. Boundary changes: Nov. 28, 1934; Aug. 29, 

1938; June 6, 1942; June 24, 1953; Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 144,419.76 Federal: 144,036.77 Nonfederal: 382.99. 



New York 



Appalachian 
National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Castle Clinton 
National Monument 

Manhattan Sites, 
National Park Service 
26 Wall St. 
New York, NY 10005 



Built 1808-11, this structure served successively as a defense for New 
York harbor, a promenade and entertainment center, and an immigration 
depot through which more than 8 million people entered the United 
States from 1855 to 1890. It is located in Battery Park, Manhattan. 
Authorized Aug. 1 2, 1 946. 
Acreage— 1.00, all Federal. 



Delaware National 
Scenic River 

(See Pennsylvania) 



Eleanor Roosevelt 
National Historic Site 

Hyde Park, NY 12538 



Mrs. Roosevelt used her "Val-Kill" estate as a personal retreat from her 

busy life. The pastoral setting of the cottage, built for her by her husband 

in 1925, includes fields, trees, swamps, and ponds. She also used the 

estate to entertain friends and dignitaries and to promote the many 

causes which interested her. 

Authorized May 27, 1977. NOT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. 

Acreage— 179. 77, all Federal. 



Federal Hall 
National Memorial 

Manhattan Sites, 
National Park Service 
26 Wall St. 
New York, NY 10005 



This graceful building is on the site of the original Federal Hall where the 
trial of John Peter Zenger, involving freedom of the press, was held in 
1735; the Stamp Act Congress convened, 1765; the Second Continental 
Congress met, 1785; Washington took the oath as first U.S. President, 
and the Bill of Rights was adopted, 1 789. Present building was completed 
in 1 842 as a Federal customs house. 

Designated as Federal Hall Memorial National Historic Site May 26, 1 939; 
changed to Federal Hall National Memorial Aug. 11,1 955. 
Acreage— 0.45, all Federal. 



Fire Island National Seashore 

120 Laurel St. 
Patchogue, NY 11772 



This barrier island off the south shore of Long Island possesses opportu- 
nities for beach-oriented recreation and ecological observations. 
Authorized Sept. 11, 1964. Boundary changes: Oct. 9, 1965; Nov. 10, 
1978. 

Acreage— 19,578.55 Federal: 6,033.92 Nonfederal: 13,544.63. Land 
area: 16,486.43. 



Fort Stanwix 
National Monument 

112 E. Park St. 
Rome, NY 13440 



The American stand here in August 1 777 was a major factor in repulsing 
the British invasion from Canada. The fort was also the site of the treaty 
of Fort Stanwix with the Iroquois Nov. 5, 1 768. 
Authorized Aug. 21, 1935; acquisition completed, 1973. 
Acreage— 15.52, all Federal. 



42 



Gateway 

National Recreation Area 

Floyd Bennett Field 
Bldg. 69 

Brooklyn, NY 11234 
(See also New Jersey) 

General Grant 
National Memorial 

Manhattan Sites, 
National Park Service 
26 Wall St. 
New York, NY 10005 



With beaches, marshes, islands, and adjacent waters in the New York 

harbor area, this park offers urban residents a wide range of recreational 

opportunities. 

Established Oct. 27, 1972. 

Acreage— 21,497.00 Federal: 18,678.00 Nonfederal: 2,819.00. 



This memorial to Ulysses S. Grant, the Union commander who brought 
the Civil War to an end, includes the tombs of General and Mrs. Grant. As 
the President of the United States (1869-77) Grant signed the act 
establishing the first national park, Yellowstone, Mar. 1, 1872. The 
memorial is on Riverside Drive near West 122nd St. 
Dedicated Apr. 27, 1897. Legislature in 1956 approved transfer by Grant 
Monument Association and the City of New York to Federal ownership; 
accepted by Congress, Aug. 14, 1958; placed under National Park 
Service, May 1, 1959. 
Acreage— 0. 76, all Federal. 



Hamilton Grange 
National Memorial 

287 Convent Ave. 
New York, NY 10031 



Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt 
National Historic Site 

Hyde Park, NY 12538 









Martin Van Buren 
National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 545 
Kinderhook, NY 12106 



Sagamore Hill 
National Historic Site 

Cove Neck Rd., Box 304 
Oyster Bay, NY 11771 



"The Grange," named after his grandfather's estate in Scotland, was the 
home of Alexander Hamilton, American statesman and first Secretary of 
the Treasury. 
Authorized Apr. 27, 1962. 
Acreage— 0. 71, all Federal. 

This was the birthplace, lifetime residence, and "Summer White House" 
of the 32d President. He entertained many distinguished visitors here. 
The gravesites of President and Mrs. Roosevelt are in the Rose Garden. 
Designated Jan. 15, 1944. A Joint Resolution of Congress, July 18, 1939, 
authorized acceptance by the Federal Government of title to any part of 
Hyde Park Estate donated to the United States. Full title to property 
accepted Nov. 21, 1945. Boundary changes: July 1, 1953; Nov. 9, 1964; 
April 30, 1975. 
Acreage— 263.89, all Federal. 

Lindenwald estate, south of Albany, was the home of the eighth Presi- 
dent—a leader in the emergence of Jacksonian Democracy— for 21 years 
until his death in 1862. BEING RESTORED; NOT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. 
Authorized Oct. 26, 1974. 
Acreage— 40.25 Federal: 12.84 Nonfederal: 27.41. 

This estate was the home of Theodore Roosevelt from 1885 until his 
death in 1919. Used as the "Summer White House" 1901-08, it contains 
original furnishings. The Old Orchard Museum is on the grounds. 
Authorized July 25, 1962. 
Acreage— 78.00, all Federal. 



Saratoga 

National Historical Park 

R.D. 1, Box 113-C 
Stillwater, NY 12170 



The American victory here over the British in 1 777 was the turning point 
of the Revolution and one of the decisive battles in world history. Maj. 
Gen. Philip Schuyler's country home and the 154-foot Saratoga monu- 
ment are nearby. 
Authorized June 1, 1938. 
Acreage— 2,457.93, all Federal. 



Statue of Liberty 
National Monument 

Liberty Island 

New York, NY 10004 

(Also in New Jersey) 



The famous 1 52-foot copper statue bearing the torch of freedom was a 
gift of the French people in 1886 to commemorate the alliance of the two 
nations in the American Revolution. The monument includes the Ameri- 
can Museum of Immigration, in the base of the statue, and Ellis Island, an 
immigration port from 1892 to 1954. 

Proclaimed Oct. 15, 1924; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933. 
Boundary changes: Sept. 7, 1937; May 11, 1965. 
Acreage— 58.38, all Federal (13.38 in N. Y.; 45.00 in N.J.). 



43 



Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace 
National Historic Site 

28 E. 20th St. 

New York, NY 10003 



Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural 
National Historic Site 

641 Delaware Ave. 
Buffalo, NY 14202 



Upper Delaware 

Scenic and Recreational River 

(See Pennsylvania) 

Vanderbilt Mansion 
National Historic Site 

Hyde Park, NY 12538 



Women's Rights 
National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 70 

Seneca Falls, NY 13148 



The 26th President was born in a brownstone house here on Oct. 27, 
1858. Demolished in 1916, it was reconstructed in the 1920s to include 
museum and period rooms. 
Authorized July 25, 1962. 
Acreage— 0. 1 1, all Federal. 

Theodore Roosevelt took the oath of office as President of the United 
States on Sept. 14, 1901, here in the Ansley Wilcox House, after the 
assassination of President William McKinley. 
Authorized Nov. 2, 1966. 
Acreage— 1 .03, all Federal. 



This palatial mansion is a fine example of homes built by 19th-century 

millionaires. 

Designated Dec. 18, 1940. 

Acreage— 21 1.65, all Federal. 

Located in Seneca Falls, this park commemorates the beginning of the 
women's struggle for equal rights and includes the Wesleyan Methodist 
Chapel, the site of the 1848 Women's Rights Convention, and the homes 
and offices of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Amelia Jenks Bloomer, and other 
notable early women's rights activisits. LIMITED PUBLIC FACILITIES. 
Authorized Dec. 8, 1980. 
Acreage— 2.45, all Nonfederal. 



North Carolina 



Appalachian 
National Scenic Trail 

(see Maine) 

Blue Ridge Parkway 

700 Northwestern Bank Bldg. 
Asheville, NC 28801 
(Also in Virginia) 



Cape Hatteras 
National Seashore 

Route 1 , Box 675 
Manteo, NC 27954 



Following the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains, this scenic parkway 
averages 3,000 feet above sea level, embracing several large recreation- 
al areas and preserving mountain folk culture and scenic resources. First 
national parkway. 

Initial construction funds allocated under authority of National Industrial 
Recovery Act June 16, 1933; act establishing parkway under National 
Park Service June 30, 1936. Boundary changes: June 30, 1961; Oct. 9, 
1968. 

Acreage— 81,536.26 Federal: 76,467.23 (45,579.49 in N.C.; 30,887.74 
in Va.) Nonfederal: 5,069.03. 

Beaches, migratory waterfowl, fishing, and points of historical interest, 
including the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse overlooking the "graveyard of the 
Atlantic," are special features of the first national seashore. 
Authorized Aug. 17, 1937. Its lands include 5,915-acre Pea Island Nation- 
al Wildlife Refuge, administered by the Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. 
Dept. of the Interior. 

Acreage— 30,318.63 Federal: 30,318.08 Nonfederal: 0.55 
Land area: 26.326.24. 



Cape Lookout 
National Seashore 

P.O. Box 690 
Beaufort, NC 28516 



This series of barrier islands extends for 58 miles along the lower Outer 

Banks embracing beaches, dunes, salt marshes, and historic Portsmouth 

Village. 

Authorized Mar. 10, 1966. Boundary change: Oct. 26, 1974. 

Acreage— 28,400.00 Federal: 21,747.33 Nonfederal: 6,652.67 Land 

area: 8,741.00 



Carl Sandburg Home 
National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 395 

Flat Rock, NC 28731 



"Connemara" was the farm home of the noted poet-author for the last 22 

years of his life. During his residence here, several of his books were 

published. 

Authorized Oct. 17, 1968; established Oct 27, 1972; opened May 11, 

1974. 

Acreage— 247.37 Federal: 246.58 Nonfederal: 0.79. 



Fort Raleigh 
National Historic Site 

c/o Cape Hatteras National 
Seashore, Route 1 , Box 675 
Manteo, NC 27954 



The first English settlement in North America was attempted here 
(1585-87). The fate of Sir Walter Raleigh's "Lost Colony" remains a 
mystery. 

Designated Apr. 5, 1941. Boundary change: Aug. 7, 1961. 
157.40 Federal: 153.05 Nonfederal: 4.35. 



Great Smoky Mountains 
National Park 

(See Tennessee) 



Guilford Courthouse 
National Battlefield 

P.O. Box 9806 
Greensboro, NC 27408 



The battle fought here on Mar. 15, 1781, opened the campaign that led to 
Yorktown and the end of the Revolution. 

Established Mar. 2, 1917; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933. 
Acreage— 220.44 Federal: 220.01 Nonfederal: 0.43. 



Moores Creek 
National Military Park 

P.O. Box 69 
Currie, NC 28435 



The battle on Feb. 27, 1776, between North Carolina Patriots and 

Loyalists, is commemorated here. The Patriot victory notably advanced 

the revolutionary cause in the South. 

Established June 2, 1926; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933. 

Boundary changes: Sept. 27, 1 944; Oct 26, 1 974. 

Acreage— 86.78 Federal: 70.85 Nonfederal: 15.93. 



Wright Brothers 
National Memorial 

c/o Cape Hatteras National 
Seashore, Route 1 , Box 675 
Manteo, NC 27954 



The first sustained flight in a heavier-than-air machine was made here by 

Wilbur and Orville Wright on Dec. 17, 1903. 

Authorized as Kill Devil Hill Monument National Memorial Mar. 2, 1927; 

transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933; redesignated Dec. 1, 1953. 

Boundary change: June 23, 1959. 

A creage—43 1. 40, all Federal. 



North Dakota 



Fort Union Trading Post 
National Historic Site 

Buford Route 
Williston, ND 58801 
(Also in Montana) 



The trading post that stood here was the principal fur-trading depot in the 
Upper Missouri River region from 1829 to 1867. Located at the conflu- 
ence of the Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers, Ft. Union served the 
Dakotas, Montana, and the Prairie Provinces. 
Authorized June 20, 1966. Boundary change: Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 436.45 Federal: 392.03 (345.03 in N Dak.; 47 16 in Mont.) 
Nonfederal: 44.26. 



Knife River Indian Villages 
National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 175 
Stanton, ND 58571 



Remnants of historic and prehistoric Indian villages, last occupied in 1845 

by the Hidatsa, contain an array of artifacts of Plains Indian culture. NO 

FEDERAL FACILITIES. 

Authorized Oct. 26, 1974. 

Acreage— 1,291.75 Federal: 1,250. to Nonfederal: 41.65. 



45 



Theodore Roosevelt 
National Park 

Medora, ND 58645 



The park includes scenic badlands along the Little Missouri River and part 
of Theodore Roosevelt's Elkhorn Ranch. 

Established as Theodore Roosevelt National Memorial Park Apr. 25, 
1947; redesignated Nov. 10, 1978. Boundary changes: June 10, 1948; 
June 12, 1948; Mar. 24, 1956; Nov. 6, 1963; Nov. 10, 1978. Wilderness 
designated: Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 70,344.64 Federal: 69,675.88 Nonfederal: 718.76. Wilder- 
ness area: 29,920. 



Ohio 



Cuyahoga Valley 
National Recreation Area 

P.O. Box 158 
Peninsula, OH 44264 



James A. Garfield 
National Historic Site 

Lawnfield 

1 950 Mentor Ave. 

Mentor, OH 44060 



This recreation area links the urban centers of Cleveland and Akron, 

preserving the rural character of the Cuyahoga River Valley and such 

historic resources as the century-old Ohio and Erie Canal system. 

LIMITED FEDERAL FACILITIES. 

Authorized Dec. 27, 1974. Established June 26, 1975. Boundary changes: 

Oct. 21, 1976; Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 32, 460. 19 Federal: 9, 104. 35 Nonfederal: 23, 355. 84. 

This site preserves property associated with the life of the 20th President. 
NO FEDERAL FACILITIES, but the site is currently managed by a private 
organization and is open to the public. 
Authorized Dec. 28, 1 980. 
A creage— 7. 65, all Nonfederal. 



Mound City Group 
National Monument 

Route 1, Box 1 
Chillicothe, OH 45601 



Perry's Victory and 
International Peace Memorial 

P.O. Box 78 
Put-in-Bay, OH 43456 



Twenty-three burial mounds of Hopewell Indians (200 B.C.-A.D. 500) 
yielded copper breastplates, tools, obsidian blades, shells, ornaments of 
grizzly bear teeth, and stone pipes carved as birds and animals. These 
provide insights into the ceremonial customs of these prehistoric people. 
Proclaimed Mar. 2, 1923; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933. 
Boundary change: Apr. 3, 1952. 
Acreage— 67.50, all Federal. 

Commodore Oliver H. Perry won the greatest naval battle of the War of 
1812 on Lake Erie. The memorial— the world's most massive Doric 
column— was constructed in 1912-15 "to inculcate the lessons of inter- 
national peace by arbitration and disarmament." 
Constructed 1912-15 with funds from Federal Government and 9 states. 
Established June 2, 1936, as national monument. Redesignated as 
Perry's Victory and International Peace Memorial Oct. 26, 1972. Boundary 
changes: Oct. 26, 1972; Aug. 16, 1978. 
Acreage— 25.38 Federal: 24.94 Nonfederal: 0.44. 



William Howard Taft 
National Historic Site 

2038 Auburn Ave. 
Cincinnati, OH 45219 



This house was the birthplace and boyhood home of the only man to 
serve both as President and Chief Justice of the United States— 27th 
President, 1909-13; U.S. Chief Justice, 1921-30. 
Authorized Dec. 2, 1969. Boundary change: Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 3.83 Federal: 0.83 Nonfederal: 3.00. 



46 



Oklahoma 



Chickasaw 

National Recreation Area 

P.O. Box 201 
Sulphur, OK 73086 



The manmade Lake of the Arbuckles provides water recreation for an 
extensive Midwest area, and numerous cold mineral- and freshwater 
springs, including bromide waters, surface here. 

Authorized as Sulphur Springs Reservation July 1 , 1 902: redesignated as 
Piatt National Park, June 29, 1906. Boundary changes: Apr. 21, 1904; 
June 1 8, 1 940. Redesignated and area enlarged: Mar. 1 7, 1 976. 
Acreage— 9, 500. 06 Federal: 9, 112.31 Nonfederal: 387. 75 
Water area: 2,409. 



Fort Smith 

National Historic Site 

(See Arkansas) 



Oregon 



Crater Lake National Park 

P.O. Box 7 

Crater Lake, OR 97604 



This unique, deep blue lake lies in the heart of Mount Mazama, an ancient 

volcanic peak that collapsed centuries ago. The lake is encircled by 

multicolored lava walls reaching 500 to 2,000 feet above the lake waters. 

Established May 22, 1902. Boundary changes: June 7, 1924; May 14, 

1932. 

Acreage— 160,290.33, all Federal. 



Fort Clatsop 
National Memorial 

Route 3, Box 604-FC 
Astoria, OR 97103 



The Lewis and Clark Expedition camped here in the winter of 1 805-06. 
Authorized May 29, 1958. Boundary change: Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 130.00 Federal: 124.97 Nonfederal: 5.03. 



John Day Fossil Beds 
National Monument 

420 W. Main St. 
John Day, OR 97845 



Plant and animal fossils show five epochs, from Eocene to end of 

Pleistocene. 

Authorized Oct. 26, 1974. Boundary change: Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 14,100.00 Federal: 9,821.66 Nonfederal: 4,278.32. 



Oregon Caves 
National Monument 

1 9000 Caves Highway 
Cave Junction, OR 97523 



Ground water dissolving marble bedrock formed these cave passages 
and intricate flowstone formations. 

Proclaimed July 12, 1909; transferred from Forest Service, U.S. Dept of 
Agriculture, Aug. 10, 1933. Boundary change: Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 473.80 Federal: 465.80 Nonfederal: 8.00. 



Pennsylvania 



Allegheny Portage Railroad 
National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 247 
Cresson, PA 16630 



Traces of the first railroad crossing of the Allegheny Mountains can still 
be seen here. An inclined plane railroad, it permitted transportation of 
passengers and freight over the mountains, providing a critical link in the 
Pennsylvania Mainline Canal system and with the West. Built between 
1831 and 1834, it was abandoned by 1857. 
Authorized Aug. 31, 1964. Boundary change: Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 1,476. 00 Federal: 649. 57 Nonfederal: 826. 43. 



Appalachian 
National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



47 



Delaware National Scenic River 

c/o Delaware Water Gap 
National Recreation Area 
Bushkill, PA 18324 
(Also in New Jersey) 



This park contains the portion of the Delaware River which lies within the 
boundaries of Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. The 
free-flowing stream offers swimming, canoeing, and fishing opportunities. 
Established Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 2, 750, all Federal. 



Delaware Water Gap 
National Recreation Area 

Bushkill, PA 18324 
(Also in New Jersey) 



This scenic area preserves relatively unspoiled land on both the New 
Jersey and Pennsylvania sides of the Middle Delaware River. The river 
segment flows through the famous gap in the Appalachian Mountains. 
The park sponsors an "Artist-in-Residence" program, and five environ- 
mental education centers. 

Authorized Sept. 1, 1965. Boundary change: Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 71,000.00 Federal: 32,636.08 (20,574.23 in N.J.; 12,061.85 
in Pa.) Nonfederal: 38,363.92. 



Edgar Allen Poe 
National Historic Site 

c/o Independence National 
Historical Park 
313 Walnut Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19106 

Eisenhower 
National Historic Site 

c/o Gettysburg National 
Military Park 
Gettysburg, PA 17325 



The life and work of this gifted American author are portrayed in this 

three-building complex at 532 N. Seventh Street where Poe lived, 

1843-44. 

Authorized Nov. 10, 1978. Established Aug. 14, 1980. 

Acreage— 0.51, all Nonfederal. 



This was the only home ever owned by Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower and 

his wife, Mamie. It served as a refuge when he was President and as a 

retirement home after he left office. 

Designated Nov. 27, 1 967; authorized by act of Congress Dec. 2, 1 969. 

Boundary change: Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 688.37 Federal: 492.54 Nonfederal: 195.83. 



Fort Necessity 
National Battlefield 

The National Pike 
Farmington, PA 15437 



Colonial troops commanded by Lt. Col. George Washington, then 22 
years old, were defeated here in the opening battle of the French and 
Indian War on July 3, 1754. The park includes the nearby monument to 
Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock and the early 19th-century Mount Washing- 
ton Tavern and Jumonville Glenn, site of the first skirmishing of the 
French and Indian War, May 28, 1754. 

Established as national battlefield site Mar. 4, 1931; transferred from War 
Dept. Aug. 10, 1933; redesignated Aug. 10, 1961. Boundary change: Oct. 
26, 1974. 
Acreage— 900.97 Federal: 745.06 Nonfederal: 155.91. 



Friendship Hill 
National Historic Site 

c/o Fort Necessity 
National Battlefield 
The National Pike 
Farmington, PA 15437 



Stone and brick home on the Monongahela River near Point Marion, Pa., 
belonged to Albert Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury, 1801-13, under 
Presidents Jefferson and Madison. NOT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. 
Authorized Nov. 10, 1978. 

-675.00 all Nonfederal. 



Gettysburg 
National Military Park 

Gettysburg, PA 17325 



The great Civil War battle fought here July 1-3, 1863, repulsed the 
second Confederate invasion of the North. Gettysburg National Ceme- 
tery— 7,036 interments, 1,668 unidentified— adjoins the park. President 
Lincoln delivered his Gettysburg Address here in dedicating the cemetery 
Nov. 19, 1863. 

Park: Established Feb. 11, 1895; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 
1933. Boundary changes: Jan. 31, 1948; July 31, 1953. 
Cemetery: Beginning dates of Civil War interments Oct. 1 863. 
Placed under War Dept. July 14, 1870. Transferred from War Dept. Aug. 
10, 1933. Boundary change: June 19, 1948. 
Park acreage— 3, 862. 40 Federal: 3, 597. 04 Nonfederal: 265. 02. 
Cemetery acreage— 20.58, all Federal. 



48 



Hopewell Village 
National Historic Site 

R.D. 1, Box 345 
Elverson, PA 19520 



Independence 
National Historical Park 

313 Walnut St. 
Philadelphia, PA 19106 



This is one of the finest examples of a rural American 19th-century 

ironmaking village. The buildings include a blast furnace, the ironmaster's 

mansion, and auxiliary structures. Hopewell Village was founded in 1 771 

by Mark Bird, the first ironmaster. The furnace operated until 1883. 

Designated Aug. 3, 1938. Boundary changes: June 6, 1942; July 24, 

1946. 

Acreage— 848.06, all Federal. 

The park includes structures and sites in central Philadelphia associated 
with the American Revolution and the founding and growth of the United 
States: Independence Hall, Congress Hall, old City Hall, the First and 
Second Banks of the United States, Franklin Court, and others. 
Authorized June 28, 1948. Established July 4, 1956. On Mar. 16, 1959, 
incorporated Philadelphia Custom House (Second Bank of the United 
States), which had been designated a national historic site May 26, 1939. 
Other boundary changes: Aug. 21, 1958; Aug. 27, 1958; Mar. 7, 1959; 
June 23, 1959; Sept. 14, 1959; Aug. 21, 1964; Oct. 26, 1974. Designated 
a World Heritage Site, Oct. 24, 1979. 
Acreage— 36.66 Federal: 33.69 Nonfederal: 2.97. 



Johnstown Flood 
National Memorial 

c/o Allegheny Portage Rail- 
road National Historic Site 
P.O. Box 247 
Cresson, PA 16630 



The tragic Johnstown Flood of 1 889 caused by a break in the South Fork 

Dam is memorialized here. 

Authorized Aug. 31, 1964. Boundary changes: Apr. 11, 1972; Nov. 10, 

1978. 

Acreage— 175.60 Federal: 68.17 Nonfederal: 107.43 



Thaddeus Kosciuszko 
National Memorial 

c/o Independence National 
Historical Park 
313 Walnut St. 
Philadelphia, PA 19106 



The life and work of this Polish-born patriot and hero of the American 
Revolution are commemorated at 301 Pine St., Philadelphia. 
Authorized Oct. 21, 1972. 
Acreage— 0.02, all Federal. 



Upper Delaware 

Scenic and Recreational River 

Drawer C 

Narrowsburg, NY 12764 
(Also in New York) 



This is a 75-mile stretch of free-flowing river between Hancock and 

Sparrow Bush, New York, along the Pennsylvania border. LIMITED 

FEDERAL FACILITIES. 

Authorized Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 75,000 Federal: 3. 18 Nonfederal: 74,996.82. 



Valley Forge 

National Historical Park 

Valley Forge, PA 19481 



Site of the Continental Army's winter encampment, 1777-1778, the park 
contains General Washington's headquarters, original earthworks, a vari- 
ety of monuments and markers, and re-creations of log buildings and 
cannon used by colonial troops. 

Authorized July 4, 1976. Boundary change: June 28, 1980. 
Acreage— 2,466.04 Federal: 135.44 Nonfederal: 2,330.60. 



Puerto Rico 



San Juan 

National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 712 

Old San Juan, PR 00902 



These massive masonry fortifications, oldest in the territorial limits of the 
United States, were begun by the Spanish in the 16th century to protect a 
strategic harbor guarding the sea lanes to the New World. 
Designated Feb. 14, 1949. Boundary change: Sept. 29, 1976. 
Acreage— 53.20, all Federal. 



49 



Rhode Island 



Roger Williams 
National Memorial 

P.O. Box 367, Annex Station 
Providence, Rl 02901 



This memorial is in honor of the founder of the Rhode Island Colony and a 
pioneer in religious freedom. 
Authorized Oct. 22, 1965. 
Acreage— 4.56, all Federal. 



South Carolina 



Congaree Swamp 
National Monument 

P.O. Box 11938 
Columbia, SC 2921 1 



Cowpens National Battlefield 

c/o Kings Mountain 
National Military Park 
P.O. Box 31 
Kings Mountain, NC 28086 



Fort Sumter 
National Monument 

1214 Middle St. 
Sullivans Island, SC 29482 



Located on an alluvial floodplain 20 miles southeast of Columbia, the park 
contains the last significant tract of virgin southern bottomland hard- 
woods in the southeastern United States. NO FEDERAL FACILITIES. 
Authorized Oct. 18, 1976. 
Acreage— 15,200.00 Federal: 367.60 Nonfederal: 14,832.40. 

Brig. Gen. Daniel Morgan won a decisive Revolutionary War victory here 

over British Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton on Jan. 17, 1781. 

Established as national battlefield site Mar. 4, 1 929; transferred from War 

Dept. Aug. 10, 1933; redesignated Apr. 11, 1972. Boundary changes: July 

18, 1958; Apr. 11, 1972. 

Acreage— 842.56 Federal: 820.70 Nonfederal: 21.86. 

The first engagement of the Civil War took place here on Apr. 12, 1861. 
The park also embraces Fort Moultrie, scene of the patriot victory of June 
28, 1 776— one of the early defeats of the British in the Revolutionary War. 
The fort has been restored to reflect 171 years of seacoast defense. 
Authorized Apr. 28, 1948; accepted by the U.S. Dept. of the Interior from 
the Dept. of the Army July 12, 1948. 
Acreage— 64.27, all Federal. 



Kings Mountain 
National Military Park 

P.O. Box 31 

Kings Mountain, NC 28086 



American frontiersmen defeated the British here on Oct. 7, 1780, at a 

critical point during the Revolution. 

Established Mar. 3, 1931; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933. 

Boundary change: June 23, 1959. 

Acreage— 3,945.29, all Federal. 



Ninety Six 

National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 357 
Ninety Six, SC 29666 



This important colonial backcountry trading village and government seat 

after 1769 was held briefly by the British during the Revolutionary War 

and is the scene of Nathanael Greene's siege in 1781. The site contains 

earthwork embankments of a 1781 fortification, the remains of two 

historic villages, a colonial plantation complex, and numerous prehistoric 

sites. 

Authorized Aug. 19, 1976. 

Acreage— 1,115. 08 Federal: 890. 16 Nonfederal: 224. 92. 



South Dakota 



Badlands National Park 

P.O. Box 6 
Interior, SD 57750 



Carved by erosion, this scenic landscape contains animal fossils of 40 
million years ago. Prairie grasslands support bison, bighorn sheep, deer, 
and antelope. 
Authorized as Badlands National Monument Mar. 4, 1929; redesignated 



50 



Nov. 10, 1978. Boundary changes: June 26, 1936; May 7, 1952; Mar. 22, 
1957; Aug. 8, 1968. Wilderness designated Oct. 20, 1976. 
Acreage— 243,302.23 Federal: 152,689.56 Nonfederal: 90,612.77. 
Wilderness area: 64,250. 



Jewel Cave National Monument 

Custer, SD 57730 



Caverns, in limestone formation, consist of a series of chambers connect- 
ed by narrow passages, with many side galleries and fine calcite crystal 
encrustations. 

Proclaimed Feb. 7, 1908; transferred from Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of 
Agriculture, Aug. 10, 1933. Boundary change: Oct. 9, 1965. 
Acreage— 1,274.56, all Federal. 



Mount Rushmore 
National Memorial 

Keystone, SD 57751 



Wind Cave National Park 

Hot Springs, SD 57747 



Colossal heads of Presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, 
Abraham Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt were sculptured by Gutzon 
Borglum on the face of a granite mountain. 

Authorized Mar. 3, 1925. Boundary changes: May 22, 1940; Oct. 6, 1949. 
Acreage— 1,278.45 Federal: 1,245.95 Nonfederal: 32.50. 

These limestone caverns in the scenic Black Hills are decorated by 

beautiful boxwork and calcite crystal formations. Elk, deer, pronghorn, 

prairie dogs, and bison live in the park. 

Established Jan. 9, 1903. Boundary changes: Mar. 4, 1931; Aug. 9, 1946; 

Nov. 10, 1978. Wind Cave National Game Preserve, established Aug. 10, 

1912, added to park June 15, 1935. 

Acreage— 28,292.08 Federal: 28,060.03 Nonfederal: 232.05. 



Tennessee 



Andrew Johnson 
National Historic Site 

Depot St. 
Greeneville, TN 37743 



Appalachian 
National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 

Big South Fork 
National River and 
Recreation Area 

P.O. Drawer 630 
Oneida, TN 37841 
(Also in Kentucky) 



Chickamauga and Chattanooga 
National Military Park 

(See Georgia) 

Cumberland Gap 
National Historical Park 

(See Kentucky) 



The site includes two homes and the tailor shop of the 1 7th President, 
who served from 1865 to 1869, and the Andrew Johnson National 
Cemetery, where the President, members of his family, and veterans of 
many wars are buried. 

Authorized as a national monument Aug. 29, 1935; redesignated a 
national historic site Dec. 11, 1963. Boundary change: Dec. 11, 1963. 
Acreage— 16.68, all Federal. 



The free-flowing Big South Fork of the Cumberland River and its tribu- 
taries pass through scenic gorges and valleys containing a wide range of 
natural and historical features. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is 
coordinating planning and development of the area. NO FEDERAL 
FACILITIES. 

Authorized Mar. 7, 1 974. National Park Service management authorized 
Oct. 22, 1976. 

Acreage— 122,960.00 Federal: 16,860.00 (16,860 in Ky.; none in 
Tenn.) Nonfederal: 106, 100.00. 



51 



Fort Donelson 
National Military Park 

P.O. Box F 
Dover, TN 37058 



The first major victory for the Union Army in the Civil War occurred here in 
February 1862 under the leadership of Ulysses S. Grant. 
Fort Donelson (Dover) National Cemetery— 1,197 interments, 512 uni- 
dentified—adjoins the park. 

Park: Established March 26, 1928; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 
1933. Boundary changes: Aug. 30, 1937; Sept. 8, 1960. Cemetery: 
Probable date of Civil War interments 1 867; transferred from War Dept. 
Aug. 10, 1933. 

Park acreage— 543.65 Federal: 530. 18 Nonfederal: 13.47. Cemetery 
■15.34, all Federal. 



Great Smoky Mountains 
National Park 

Gatlinburg, TN 37738 
(Also in North Carolina) 



Loftiest range east of the Black Hills, and one of the oldest uplands on 
earth, the Smokies have a diversified and luxuriant plantlife, often of 
extraordinary size. The park has been selected for International Bio- 
sphere Reserve status. 

Authorized May 22, 1926; established for administration and protection 
only, Feb. 6, 1930; established for full development June 15, 1934. 
Boundary changes: Apr. 19, 1930; July 19; 1932; June 15, 1934; June 11, 
1940; Feb. 22, 1944; July 26, 1950; May 16, 1958; Sept. 9, 1963; Aug. 10, 
1964; Aug. 9, 1969; Nov. 4, 1969. 

Acreage— 517,368. 15 Federal: 514,757.53 (273,550.70 in N.C.; 
24 1,206. 83 in Tenn.J Nonfederal: 2,610. 62. 



Natchez Trace Parkway 

(See Mississippi) 

Obed Wild and Scenic River 

P.O. Drawer 630 
Oneida, TN 37841 



The Obed River and its two main tributaries, Clear Creek and Daddy's 
Creek, cut into the Cumberland Plateau of east Tennessee, providing 
some of the most rugged scenery in the southeast. Elevations range from 
900 to 2,900 feet above sea level. NO FEDERAL FACILITIES. 
Authorized Oct. 12, 1976. 
Acreage— 5,250.00, all Nonfederal. 



Shiloh 

National Military Park 

Shiloh, TN 38376 



The bitter battle fought here Apr. 6-7, 1862, prepared the way for Maj. 
Gen. U.S. Grant's successful siege of Vicksburg. Well-preserved prehis- 
toric Indian mounds overlook the river. 

Shiloh (Pittsburg Landing) National Cemetery— 3,761 interments, 2,370 
unidentified— adjoins the park. 

Park: Established Dec. 27, 1894; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 
1933. Boundary changes: June 25, 1947; Aug. 22, 1957; May 16, 1958. 
Cemetery: Probable date of Civil War interments, 1 866. Transferred from 
War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933. 

Park acreage— 3,761.50 Federal: 3,706.50 Nonfederal: 55.00. Ceme- 
tery acreage— 10.05, all Federal. 



Stones River 
National Battlefield 

Route 10, Box 401 
Old Nashville Hwy. 
Murfreesboro, TN 37130 



The fierce midwinter battle, which began the Federal offensive to trisect 

the Confederacy, took place here Dec. 31, 1862-Jan. 2, 1863. 

Stones River (Murfreesboro) National Cemetery— 6,831 interments, 2,562 

unidentified— adjoins the park; grave space not available. 

Park: Established as a national military park Mar. 3, 1927; transferred 

from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933; changed to national battlefield Apr. 22, 

1 960. Boundary change: Apr. 22, 1 960. Cemetery: Probable date of Civil 

War interments 1865. Transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933. 

Park acreage— 330.86, all Federal. Cemetery acreage— 20.09, all 

Federal. 



52 



Texas 



Alibates Flint Quarries 
National Monument 

c/o Lake Meredith NRA 
P.O. Box 1438 
Fritch, TX 79036 



For more than 10,000 years, pre-Columbian Indians dug agatized dolo- 
mite from quarries here to make projectile points, knives, scrapers, and 
other tools. 

Authorized as Alibates Flint Quarries and Texas Panhandle Pueblo 
Culture National Monument Aug. 21, 1965; redesignated Nov. 10, 1978. 
Boundary change: Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 1,332.56 Federal: 1,062.56 Nonfederal: 270.00. 



Amistad 

National Recreation Area 

Star Route 2, Box 5-P 
Highway 90 West 
Del Rio, TX 78840 



Boating and watersports highlight activities in the U.S. section of Amistad 
Reservoir on the Rio Grande. 

Administered under cooperative agreement with United States Section, 
International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and Mexi- 
co, Nov. 11, 1965. 
Acreage— 62,451.74 Federal: 57,292.44 Nonfederal: 5,159.30. 



Big Bend National Park 

Big Bend National 
Park, TX 79834 



Mountains contrast with desert in this great bend of the Rio Grande, 
where a variety of unusual geological formations are found. 
Authorized June 20, 1935; established June 12, 1944. Boundary changes: 
Aug. 30, 1949; Nov. 5, 1957. 
Acreage— 708, 1 18.40, all Federal. 



Big Thicket National Preserve 

P.O. Box 7408 
Beaumont, TX 77706 



Chamizal National Memorial 

First City National 
Bank Bldg., Room 620 
300 East Main Dr. 
El Paso, TX 79901 



Fort Davis 

National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 1456 

Fort Davis, TX 79734 

Guadalupe Mountains 
National Park 

3225 National Parks Hwy. 
Carlsbad, NM 88220 



This unique ecosystem is a mingling of diverse plant associations result- 
ing in a large variety of plant species found in close proximity. Study and 
research opportunities are excellent. LIMITED FEDERAL FACILITIES. 
Authorized Oct. 11, 1974. 
Acreage— 84,550.00 Federal: 55,938.63 Nonfederal: 28,611.37. 

The peaceful settlement of a 99-year boundary dispute between the 
United States and Mexico is memorialized here. The Chamizal Treaty, 
ending the dispute, was signed in 1963. An amphitheater and 500-seat 
auditorium are used by the theatrical groups from both nations. 
Authorized June 30, 1 966; established Feb. 4, 1 974. 
Acreage— 54.90 all Federal. 

A key post in the West Texas defensive system, the fort guarded 
emigrants on the San Antonio-El Paso road from 1854 to 1891. 
Authorized Sept. 8, 1961. 
Acreage— 460.00, all Federal. 

Rising from the desert, this mountain mass contains portions of the 
world's most extensive and significant Permian limestone fossil reef. Also 
featured are a tremendous earth fault, lofty peaks, unusual flora and 
fauna, and a colorful record of the past. 

Authorized Oct. 1 5, 1 966; established Sept. 30, 1 972. Wilderness desig- 
nated Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 76,293.06 Federal: 76,292.07 Nonfederal: 0.99. Wilder- 
ness area: 46,850. 



Lake Meredith 
Recreation Area 

P.O. Box 1438 
Fritch, TX 79036 



Lyndon B. Johnson 
National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 329 
Johnson City, TX 78636 



Manmade Lake Meredith on the Canadian River is a popular water- 
activity center in the Southwest. 

Administered under cooperative agreement with Bureau of Reclamation, 
U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Mar. 15, 1965. Name changed from Sanford 
National Recreational Area Oct. 16, 1972. 
Acreage— 44, 994. 30, all Federal. Land area: 7, 768. 

The birthplace, boyhood home, and ranch of the 36th President, 1 963-69, 

and his grandparents' old ranch make up the park. 

Authorized Dec. 2, 1969, as national historic site; redesignated as 

national historical park, Dec. 28, 1980. 

Acreage— 1, 477. 78 Federal: 235. 78 Nonfederal: 1,242. 



53 



Padre Island 
National Seashore 

9405 S. Padre Island Dr. 
Corpus Christi, TX 78418 



Noted for its wide sand beaches, excellent fishing, and abundant bird and 

marine life, this barrier island stretches along the Gulf Coast for 80.5 

miles. 

Authorized Sept. 28, 1962. Established Apr. 6, 1968. 

Acreage— 133,918.72 Federal: 132,202.87 Nonfederal: 1,715.85. 

Land area: 51, 774.20. 



Palo Alto Battlefield 
National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 191 
Brownsville, TX 78520 



The park contains the site of the first of two important Mexican War 
battles fought on American soil. Gen. Zachary Taylor's victory here made 
invasion of Mexico possible. NO FEDERAL FACILITIES. 
Authorized Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 50.00, all Nonfederal. 



Rio Grande 

Wild and Scenic River 

c/o Big Bend National Park 

Big Bend National Park, TX 79834 



A 191.2-mile strip on the American shore of the Rio Grande in the 

Chihuahuan Desert protects the river. It begins in Big Bend National Park 

and continues downstream to the Terrell-Val Verde County Line. NO 

FEDERAL FACILITIES. 

Authorized Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 9,600.00 outside Big Bend National Park, all Nonfederal. 



San Antonio Missions 
National Historical Park 

c/o Southwest Regional Office 
National Park Service 
P.O. Box 728 
Santa Fe, NM 87501 



Four Catholic frontier missions, part of a system that stretched across the 
Spanish Southwest in the 18th century, are commemorated here. Includ- 
ed in the park are a related historic dam and aqueduct system. NO 
FEDERAL FACILITIES, missions open to the public. 
Authorized Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 462.68, all Nonfederal. 



Utah 



Arches National Park 

446 S. Main St. 
Moab, UT 84532 



Extraordinary products of erosion in the form of giant arches, windows, 

pinnacles, and pedestals change color constantly as the sun moves 

overhead. 

Proclaimed as a national monument Apr. 12, 1929; established as a 

national park Nov. 12, 1971. Boundary changes: Nov. 25, 1938; July 22, 

1960; Jan. 20, 1969. 

Acreage— 73,378.98 Federal 66,343.51 Nonfederal: 7,035.47. 



Bryce Canyon National Park 

Bryce Canyon, UT 84717 



Canyonlands National Park 

446 S. Main St. 
Moab, UT 84532 



In horseshoe-shaped amphitheaters along the edge of the Paunsaugunt 
Plateau in southern Utah stand innumerable highly colored and bizarre 
pinnacles, walls, and spires, perhaps the most colorful and unusual 
erosional forms in the world. 

Proclaimed as Bryce Canyon National Monument June 8, 1 923; author- 
ized as Utah National Park June 7, 1924; changed to Bryce Canyon 
National Park Feb. 25. 1928. Boundary changes: May 12, 1928; June 13, 
1930; Jan. 5, 1931; Feb. 17, 1931; May 4, 1931; Mar. 7, 1942. 
Acreage— 35,835.08 Federal: 35,832.58 Nonfederal: 2.50. 

In this geological wonderland, rocks, spires, and mesas rise more than 

7,800 feet. Here, too, are petroglyphs left by Indians about 1,000 years 

ago. 

Established Sept. 12, 1964. Boundary change: Nov. 12, 1971. 

Acreage— 337,570.43, all Federal. 



Capitol Reef National Park 

Torrey, UT 84775 



Narrow high-walled gorges cut through a 60-mile uplift of sandstone cliffs 

with highly colored sedimentary formations. Dome-shaped white-cap rock 

along the Fremont River accounts for the name. 

Proclaimed as a national monument Aug. 2, 1937; established as a 

national park Dec. 18, 1971. Boundary changes: July 2, 1958; Jan. 20, 

1969; Dec. 18, 1971. 

Acreage— 241,904.26 Federal 222,753.35 Nonfederal: 19,150.91. 



54 



Cedar Breaks 
National Monument 

P.O. Box 749 

Cedar City, UT 84720 



A huge natural amphitheater has eroded into the variegated Pink Cliffs 

(Wasatch Formation), which are 2,000 feet thick at this point. 

Proclaimed Aug. 22, 1933. Boundary changes: Mar. 7, 1942; June 30, 

1961. 

Acreage— 6, 154.60, all Federal. 



Dinosaur National Monument 

(See Colorado) 



Glen Canyon 

National Recreation Area 

P.O. Box 1507 
Page, AZ 86040 
(Also in Arizona) 



Lake Powell, formed by the Colorado River, stretches for 186 miles 

behind one of the highest dams in the world. 

Administered under cooperative agreements with Bureau of Reclamation, 

U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Apr. 18, 1958, and Sept. 17, 1965. Established 

Oct. 27, 1972. Boundary change: Jan. 3, 1975. 

Acreage— 1,236,880.00 Federal: 1, 157,463 00 (95, 725.00 in Ariz.; 

1, 06 1, 738. 00 in Utah) Nonfederal: 79, 4 1 7. 00. 



Golden Spike 
National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 394 

Brigham City, UT 84302 



Completion of the first transcontinental railroad in the United States was 
celebrated here where the Central Pacific and Union Pacific Railroads 
met in 1869. 

Designated as a national historic site in nonfederal ownership Apr. 2, 
1957; authorized for Federal ownership and administration by act of 
Congress July 30, 1965. Boundary change: July 30, 1965. 
Acreage— 2,203.20, all Federal. 



Hovenweep National Monument 

(See Colorado) 

Natural Bridges 
National Monument 

c/o Canyonlands National Park 
446 S. Main St. 
Moab, UT 84532 



Three natural bridges, carved out of sandstone, are protected here. The 
highest is 220 feet above the streambed, with a span of 268 feet. 
Proclaimed Apr. 16, 1908. Boundary changes: Apr. 16, 1908; Sept. 25, 
1909; Feb. 11, 1916; Aug. 14, 1962. 
Acreage— 7, 779. 14, all Federal. 



Rainbow Bridge 
National Monument 

c/o Glen Canyon National 
Recreation Area 
P.O. Box 1507 
Page, AZ 86040 



Greatest of the world's known natural bridges, this symmetrical arch of 
salmon-pink sandstone rises 290 feet above the floor of Bridge Canyon. 
LIMITED FEDERAL FACILITIES. 
Proclaimed May 30, 1910. 
Acreage— 160.00, all Federal. 



Timpanogos Cave 
National Monument 

R.R. 3, Box 200 
American Fork, UT 84003 



The colorful limestone cavern on the side of Mount Timpanogos is noted 

for helictites— water-created formations that grow in all directions and 

shapes, regardless of the pull of gravity. 

Proclaimed Oct. 14, 1922; transferred from Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of 

Agriculture, Aug. 10, 1933. 

Acreage— 250.00, all Federal. 



Zion National Park 

Springdale, UT 84767 



Colorful canyon and mesa scenery includes erosion and rock-fault pat- 
terns that create phenomenal shapes and landscapes. Evidence of 
former volcanic activity is here, too. 

Mukuntuweap National Monument proclaimed July 31, 1909, incorporat- 
ed in Zion National Monument by proclamation Mar. 18, 1918. Estab- 
lished as national park Nov. 19, 1919. Separate Zion National Monument 
proclaimed Jan. 22, 1937, incorporated in park July 11, 1956. Other 
boundary changes: June 13, 1930; June 3, 1941; Feb. 20, 1960; Oct. 21, 
1976. 
Acreage— 146, 546. 97 Federal: 142, 532. 05 Nonfederal: 4, 14. 92. 



55 



Vermont 



Appalachian 
National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 



Virginia 



Appalachian 
National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 

Appomattox Court House 
National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 218 
Appomattox, VA 24522 



Arlington House, 

The Robert E. Lee Memorial 

c/o George Washington 
Memorial Parkway, 
Turkey Run Park, 
McLean, VA 22101 



Assateague Island 
National Seashore 

(See Maryland) 

Blue Ridge Parkway 

(See North Carolina) 



Here on Apr. 9, 1865, Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered the Confederacy's 
largest field army to Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant. 

Authorized as Appomattox Battlefield Site June 18, 1930; transferred 
from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933; authorized as National Historical Monu- 
ment Aug. 1 3, 1 935; designated National Historical Park Apr. 1 5, 1 954. 
Boundary changes: Feb. 23, 1939; Oct. 21, 1976. 
Acreage— 1,318. 70 Federal: 1,238. 53 Nonfederal: 80. 1 7. 

This antebellum home of the Custis and Lee families overlooks the 
Potomac River and Washington, D.C. 

Authorized Mar. 4, 1925; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933; made 
a permanent memorial to Robert E. Lee by act of Congress June 29, 
1955. Name changed by Public Law 92-333 to Arlington House, The 
Robert E. Lee Memorial June 30, 1972. Boundary change: Nov. 3, 1959. 
Acreage— 27.91 , all Federal. 



Booker T. Washington 
National Monument 

Route 1, Box 195 
Hardy, VA 24101 

Colonial 

National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 210 
Yorktown, VA 23690 



Cumberland Gap 
National Historical Park 

(See Kentucky) 



This site was the birthplace and early childhood home of the famous 
black leader and educator. 
Authorized Apr. 2, 1956. 
Acreage— 223.92, all Federal. 

This park encompasses most of Jamestown Island, site of the first 

permanent English settlement; Yorktown, scene of the culminating battle 

of the American Revoluton in 1781; a 23-mile parkway connecting these 

and other colonial sites with Williamsburg; and Cape Henry Memorial, 

which marks the approximate site of the first landing of Jamestown's 

colonists in 1 607. 

Yorktown National Cemetery, containing Civil War gravesites— 2,183 

interments, 1,434 unidentified— adjoins the park; grave space is not 

available. 

Colonial National Monument authorized July 3, 1 930; proclaimed Dec. 30, 

1930; redesignated June 5, 1936. Boundary changes: Aug. 22, 1933; 

June 5, 1936; June 15, 1938; Dec. 24, 1942; Apr. 22, 1944; Dec. 23, 

1944; May 12, 1948; Sept. 23, 1950; May 13. 1953; Mar. 29, 1956; Aug. 

29, 1967. 

Cemetery: probable date of Civil War interments, 1866. Transferred from 

War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933. 

Park acreage— 9, 833. 83 Federal: 8,816. 06 Nonfederal: 1,017.31 

Cemetery acreage— 2.91 , all Federal. 



56 



Fredericksburg 
and Spotsylvania County 
Battlefields Memorial 
National Military Park 

P.O. Box 679 
Fredericksburg, VA 22401 



George Washington Birthplace 
National Monument 

Washington's Birthplace, VA 
22575 



Portions of four major Civil War Battlefields— Fredericksburg, Chancel- 
lorsville, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House— Chatham Manor, 
and several smaller historic sites comprise the park. The battles occurred 
between 1862 and 1864. 

Fredericksburg National Cemetery— 15,333 interments, 12,746 unidenti- 
fied—is near the park; grave space is not available. 
Park: Established Feb. 14, 1927; transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 
1 933. Cemetery: Probable date of unidentified Civil War interments, 1 865. 
Transferred from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933. 
Park acreage— 5, 888. 6 1 Federal: 5, 090. 50 Nonfederal: 798. 1 1 
Cemetery acreage— 1 2.00, all Federal. 

Birthplace of the first U.S. President, the park includes a memorial 

mansion and gardens, and the tombs of his father, grandfather, and 

great-grandfather. 

Established Jan. 23, 1930. Boundary changes: Mar. 30, 1931; Apr. 11, 

1972; Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 538.23, all Federal. 



George Washington 
Memorial Parkway 

Turkey Run Park, 
McLean, VA 22101 
(Also in Maryland) 



This landscaped riverfront parkway links many landmarks in the life of 

George Washington. It connects Mount Vernon and Great Falls on the 

Virginia side of the Potomac and Great Falls with Chain Bridge on the 

Maryland side. The parkway includes natural, historical, and recreational 

areas. 

Act providing for acquisition of land, establishment, and development of 

the parkway May 29, 1930. Transferred from Office of Public Buildings 

and Public Roads of the National Capital Aug. 10, 1933. Boundary 

changes: May 13, 1947; Oct. 10, 1965; Oct. 21, 1976. 

Acreage— 7, 14 1.63 Federal: 7,04260 (1,800.07 in Md; 5,24 1.84 in Va.) 

Nonfederal: 99.03. 



Harpers Ferry 
National Historical Park 

(See West Virginia) 



Maggie L. Walker 
National Historic Site 

c/o Richmond National 
Battlefield Park 
3215 E. Broad St. 
Richmond, VA 23223 



This rowhouse at 110V2 E. Leigh St., Richmond, was the home of the 
daughter of an ex-house slave who became the first woman president of 
an American financial institution. NO FEDERAL FACILITIES. 
Authorized Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 1.28, all Nonfederal. 



Manassas 

National Battlefield Park 

P.O. Box 350 
Manassas, V A 22110 



The Battles of First and Second Manassas were fought here July 21, 
1861, and Aug. 28-30, 1862. The 1861 battle was the first test of 
Northern and Southern military prowess. Here, Confederate Brig. Gen. 
Thomas J. Jackson acquired his nickname "Stonewall." 
Designated May 10, 1940. Boundary change: Apr. 17, 1954. 
Acreage— 3,108.87 Federal: 3,003.37 Nonfederal: 105.50. 



Petersburg National Battlefield 

P.O. Box 549 
Petersburg, VA 23803 



The Union Army waged a 10-month campaign here 1864-65 to seize 

Petersburg, center of the railroads supplying Richmond and Gen. Robert 

E. Lee's army. Also includes City Point in Hopewell, Va., where Ulysses S. 

Grant made his headquarters at Appomattox Manor for the final ten 

months of the war. 

Poplar Grove (Petersburg) National Cemetery— 6,315 interments, 4,110 

unidentified— is near the park; grave space is not available. 

Park: Established as a national military park July 3, 1926; transferred from 

War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933, changed to national battlefield Aug. 24, 1962. 

Boundary changes: June 5, 1942; Sept. 7, 1949; Apr. 11, 1972; Nov. 10, 

1978. Cemetery: Probable date of Civil War interments 1866. Transferred 

from War Dept. Aug. 10, 1933. 

Park acreage— 1 ,536.26 Federal: 1,507.10 Nonfederal: 29.16. 

Cemetery acreage— 8. 72, all Federal. 



57 



Prince William Forest Park 

P.O. Box 208 
Triangle, VA 22172 



Richmond 

National Battlefield Park 

3215 East Broad St. 
Richmond, VA 23223 

Shenandoah National Park 

Rt. 4, Box 292 
Luray, VA 22835 



Wolf Trap Farm Park 
for the Performing Arts 

P.O. Box 466 
Vienna, VA 22180 



In this forested watershed of Quantico Creek, pines and hardwoods have 
replaced worn-out farmland. 

Chopawamsic Recreation Demonstration Area transferred from Resettle- 
ment Administration Nov. 14, 1936; changed to Prince William Forest 
Park June 22, 1948. 
Acreage— 18,571.55 Federal: 17,410.34 Nonfederal: 1,161.21. 

The park commemorates several battles to capture Richmond, the 
Confederate capital, during the Civil War. 
Authorized Mar. 2, 1936. Boundary change: Mar. 3, 1956. 
Acreage— 769. 13, all Federal. 

Skyline Drive winds through hardwood forests along the crest of this 

outstanding portion of the Blue Ridge Mountains, with spectacular vistas 

of historic Shenandoah Valley and the Piedmont. 

Authorized May 22, 1926; fully established Dec. 26, 1935. Boundary 

changes: Feb. 16, 1928; Feb. 4, 1932; June 13, 1939; June 6, 1942; Sept. 

13, 1960; June 30, 1961. Wilderness designated Oct. 20, 1976, and Sept. 

1, 1978. 

Acreage— 194,801.20, all Federal. Wilderness area: 79,579. 

At this first national park for the performing arts, Filene Center can 
accommodate an audience of 6,500, including 3,000 on the sloping lawn 
in a setting of rolling hills and woods. The stagehouse is 10 stories high 
and the stage 1 00 feet wide by 64 feet deep. 
Authorized Oct. 1 5, 1 966. 
Acreage— 130.28, all Federal. 



Virgin Islands 



Buck Island Reef 
National Monument 

Box 1 60, Christiansted, 
St. Croix, VI 00820 



Christiansted 
National Historic Site 

P.O. Box 160, Christiansted, 
St. Croix, VI 00820 



Virgin Islands National Park 

P.O. Box 806 
Charlotte Amalie, 
St. Thomas, VI 00801 



Coral grottoes, sea fans, gorgonias, and tropical fishes— along an under- 
water trail— make this one of the finest marine gardens in the Caribbean. 
The island is a rookery for frigate birds and pelicans and the habitat of 
green turtles. 

Proclaimed Dec. 28, 1961. Boundary change: Feb. 1, 1975. 
Acreage— 880.00, all Federal Land area: 143.00. 

Colonial development of the Virgin Islands is commemorated by 18th- 

and 19th-century structures in the capital of the former Danish West 

Indies on St. Croix Island. Discovered by Columbus in 1493, St. Croix was 

purchased by the United States in 1917. 

Designated as Virgin Islands National Historic Site Mar. 4, 1 952; changed 

to Christiansted National Historic Site Jan. 16, 1961. Boundary change: 

June 27, 1962. 

Acreage— 27. 15, all Federal. 

The park covers about three-fourths of St. John Island and Hassel Island 
in St. Thomas harbor and includes quiet coves, blue-green waters, and 
white sandy beaches fringed by lush green hills. Here, too, are early Carib 
Indian relics and the remains of Danish colonial sugar plantations. 
Authorized Aug. 2, 1956. Boundary changes: June 29, 1960; Oct. 5, 1962; 
Aug. 18, 1978. 

Acreage 14,708.71 Federal: 12,678.81 Nonfederal: 2,029.90 Land 
area: 11,899.23. 



58 



Washington 



Coulee Dam 

National Recreation Area 

P.O. Box 37 

Coulee Dam, WA 99116 



Fort Vancouver 
National Historic Site 

Vancouver, WA 98661 



Formed by Grand Coulee Dam (part of the Columbia River Basin project), 
130-mile long Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake is the principal recreation 
feature here. 

Administered under cooperative agreement with Bureau of Reclamation 
and Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Dec. 18, 1946. 
Acreage— 100, 059. 00, all Federal. 

As the western headquarters of Hudson's Bay Company, 1 825 to 1 849, 

this was the hub of political and fur-trading activities. A U.S. military 

reservation— Vancouver Barracks established in 1 849— took over the fort 

in 1 860, remaining active until 1 949. 

Authorized as a national monument June 19, 1948; changed to national 

historic site June 30, 1961. Boundary changes: Jan. 15, 1958; June 30, 

1961; Apr. 4, 1972. 

Acreage— 208.89 Federal: 201.73 Nonfederal: 7.16. 



Klondike Gold Rush 
National Historical Park 

c/o Pacific Northwest Region 
National Park Service 
2001 6th Ave 
Seattle, WA 98121 
(See also Alaska) 

Lake Chelan 

National Recreation Area 

800 State St. ' 

Sedro Woolley, WA 98284 

Mount Rainier National Park 

Tahoma Woods, Star Route 
Ashford, WA 98304 



The park orientation center is at 117 S. Main St. in Seattle's Pidneer 

Square area. 

Authorized June 30, 1976. 



Here the beautiful Stehekin Valley, with a portion of fjordlike Lake Chelan, 
adjoins the southern unit of North Cascades National Park. 
Established Oct. 2, 1968. 
Acreage— 61,889.84 Federal: 61,128.32 Nonfederal: 761 .52. 

This greatest single-peak glacial system in the United States radiates 

from the summit and slopes of an ancient volcano, with dense forests and 

subalpine flowered meadows below. 

Established Mar. 2, 1899. Boundary changes: May 28, 1926; Jan. 31, 

1931; June 27, 1960. 

Acreage— 235,404.00 Federal: 235,239.16 Nonfederal: 164.84. 



North Cascades National Park 

800 State St. 

Sedro Woolley, WA 98284 



High jagged peaks intercept moisture-laden winds, producing glaciers, 

icefalls, waterfalls, and other water phenomena in this wild alpine region 

where lush forests and meadows, plant and animal communities thrive in 

the valleys. 

Established Oct. 2, 1968. 

Acreage— 504,780.34 Federal: 503,277.58 Nonfederal: 1,502.76. 



Olympic National Park 

600 East Park Ave. 
Port Angeles, WA 98362 



This mountain wilderness contains the finest remnant of Pacific North- 
west rain forest, active glaciers, rare Roosevelt elk, and 50 miles of wild, 
scenic ocean shore. 

Proclaimed as Mount Olympus National Monument Mar. 2, 1909; trans- 
ferred from Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Aug. 10, 1933; 
established as Olympic National Park June 29, 1 938. Boundary changes: 
Jan. 2, 1940; May 29, 1943; Jan. 6, 1953; Oct. 21, 1976. 
Acreage— 908, 720. 42 Federal: 894, 992. 98 Nonfederal: 13, 727. 44. 



Ross Lake 

National Recreation Area 

800 State St. 

Sedro Woolley, WA 98284 

San Juan Island 
National Historical Park 

300 Cattle Point Road 
Friday Harbor, WA 98250 



Ringed by mountains, this reservoir in the Skagit River drainage sepa- 
rates the north and south units of North Cascades National Park. 
Established Oct. 2, 1968. 
Acreage— 117,574.09 Federal: 105,490.47 Nonfederal: 12,083.62. 

This park marks the historic events on the island from 1853 to 1871 in 
connection with final settlement of the Oregon Territory's northern bound- 
ary, including the so-called Pig War of 1859. 
Authorized Sept. 9, 1 966. 
Acreage— 1, 75 1. 00 Federal: 1, 725 45 Nonfederal: 25. 54. 



59 



Whitman Mission 
National Historic Site 

Route 2 

Walla Walla, WA 99362 



Dr. and Mrs. Marcus Whitman ministered to spiritual and physical needs 

of the Indians here until slain by a few of themth 1847. The mission was a 

landmark on the Oregon Trail. 

Authorized as Whitman National Monument June 29, 1 936; changed to 

Whitman Mission National Historic Site Jan. 1 , 1 963. Boundary changes: 

Feb. 7, 1961; Feb. 8, 1963. 

Acreage— 98. 15, all Federal. 



West Virginia 



Appalachian 
National Scenic Trail 

(See Maine) 

Chesapeake and Ohio Canal 
National Historical Park 

(See Maryland) 

Harpers Ferry 
National Historical Park 

P.O. Box 65 

Harpers Ferry, WV 25425 

(Also in Maryland and Virginia) 



Because of its strategic location at the confluence of the Shenandoah 

and Potomac Rivers, this town changed hands many times during the 

Civil War. John Brown's raid took place here in 1 859. 

Authorized as a national monument June 30, 1 944; changed to national 

historical park May 29, 1963. Boundary changes: July 14, 1960; Oct. 24, 

1974; Mar. 5, 1980. 

Acreage— 2,475 Federal: 2,025.26 (763.07 in Md; 370. 14 in Va.; 892.05 

inW.Va.) Nonfederal: 449.74. 



New River Gorge National River 

137V 2 Main St. 
P.O. Drawer V 
Oak Hill, WV 25901 



A rugged, Whitewater river, flowing northward through deep canyons, the 
New is among the oldest rivers on the continent. The free-flowing, 52-mile 
section from Hinton to Fayetteville is abundant in natural, scenic, historic, 
and recreational values. NO FEDERAL FACILITIES. 
Authorized Nov. 1 0, 1 978. 
Acreage— 62,024.00, all Nonfederal. 



Wisconsin 



Apostle Islands 
National Lakeshore 

P.O. Box 729 
Bayfield, Wl 54814 



Twenty picturesque islands and an 11 -mile strip of adjacent Bayfield 
Peninsula along the south shore of Lake Superior comprise this park. 
Established Sept. 26, 1970. 

Acreage— 42,009.20 Federal: 39,265.35 Nonfederal: 2,743.85. Land 
area: 16,321.90. 



Lower St. Croix 
National Scenic Riverway 

c/o St. Croix National 

Scenic River, 

P.O. Box 708 

St. Croix Falls, Wl 54024 

(Also in Minnesota) 



Recreational opportunities for much of the upper Midwest are provided 
here along this 27-mile segment of the St. Croix River, a component of 
the Wild and Scenic Rivers System. LIMITED FEDERAL FACILITIES. 
Authorized Oct. 25, 1972. 

Acreage— 8,670.00 Federal: 4,848.71 (2,90719 in Minn; 1,941.52 in 
Wis.) Nonfederal: 3,830.29. 



St. Croix 

National Scenic Riverway 

P.O. Box 708 

St. Croix Falls, Wl 54024 

(Also in Minnesota) 



About 200 miles of the beautiful St. Croix River and its Namekagon 

tributary make up this area, an initial component of the National Wild and 

Scenic Rivers System. LIMITED FEDERAL FACILITIES. 

Authorized Oct. 2, 1968; placed under National Park Service Sept. 4, 

1969. 

Acreage— 62,695.91 Federal: 17,969.97 (1,915.61 in Minn.; 16,054.36 

in Wis.) Nonfederal; 44,725.94. 



60 



Wyoming 

Bighorn Canyon 
National Recreation Area 

(See Montana) 



Devils Tower 
National Monument 

Devils Tower, WY 82714 



Fort Laramie 
National Historic Site 

Fort Laramie, WY 82212 



Fossil Butte 
National Monument 

P.O. Box 527 
Kemerer, WY 83101 



This 865-foot tower of columnar rock, the remains of a volcanic intrusion, 
is the Nation's first national monument. 
Proclaimed Sept. 24, 1 906. Boundary change: Aug. 9, 1 955. 
Acreage— 1,346.91, all Federal. 

A fur-trade post once stood here, but the surviving buildings are those of 

a major military post that guarded covered-wagon trails to the West, 

1849-90. 

Proclaimed as a national monument July 16, 1938; changed to national 

historic site Apr. 29, 1960. Boundary changes: Apr. 29, 1960; Nov. 10, 

1978. 

Acreage— 856.36 Federal: 562.80 Nonfederal: 293.56. 

An abundance of rare fish fossils, 40-65 million years old, is evidence of 

former habitation of this now semiarid region. 

Established Oct. 23, 1972. 

Acreage— 8,198.00 Federal: 7,438.00 Nonfederal: 760.00. 



Grand Teton National Park 

P.O. Drawer 170 
Moose, WY 83012 



The most impressive part of the Teton Range, this series of blue-gray 
peaks rising more than a mile above the sagebrush flats was once a 
noted landmark of Indians and "Mountain Men." The park includes part of 
Jackson Hole, winter feeding ground of the largest American elk herd. 
Established Feb. 26, 1929. Boundary change: Sept. 14, 1 950— incorpora- 
tion of part of former Jackson Hole National Monument proclaimed, Mar. 
15, 1943. Portions of the monument were absorbed by National Elk 
Refuge, administered by Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Dept. of the 
Interior, and Teton National Forest, administered by Forest Service, U.S. 
Dept. of Agriculture. 
Acreage— 3 10, 5 15. 93 Federal: 305, 583. 85 Nonfederal: 4, 932. 08. 



John D. Rockefeller, Jr. 
Memorial Parkway 

c/o Grand Teton 
National Park 
P.O. Drawer 1 70 
Moose, WY 83012 



Linking West Thumb in Yellowstone with the South Entrance of Grand 
Teton National Park, this scenic 82-mile corridor commemorates Rocke- 
feller's role in aiding establishment of many parks, including Grand Teton. 
Authorized Aug. 25, 1 972. 
Acreage— 23, 777.22, all Nonfederal. 



Yellowstone National Park 

P.O. Box 168 

Yellowstone National Park, 
WY 82190 
(Also in Montana and Idaho) 



Old Faithful and some 10,000 other geysers and hot springs make this 

the earth's greatest geyser area. Here, too, are lakes, waterfalls, high 

mountains, and the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone— all set apart in 

1 872 as the world's first national park. 

Established Mar. 1, 1872. Boundary changes: May 26, 1926; Mar. 1, 

1929; Apr. 19, 1930; Oct. 20, 1932. Designated a World Heritage Site, 

Sept. 6, 1978. 

Acreage— 2,219,822.70 Federal: 2,219,804.72 (2,020,625.07 in Wyo.; 

167, 623. 8 1 in Mont; 3 1, 488. 00 in Idaho) Nonfederal: 1 7 98. 



61 






►!♦!♦!♦!<■ 








Related Areas 



Affiliated Areas 

Wild and Scenic Rivers System 

National Trail System 




Campobello was Franklin Roosev 
Brunswick, Canada. It<was whi 
contracted polio. The njbuse to 
Campobello International Pa 



^* i~ii»s 




For weary travelers on the Oregon Trail, Chimney Rock was 
a momentous landmark, for it was a visible sign that a good 
deal of the long journey was now behind them. Today this 
historic natural feature is a national historic site owned by the 
State of Nebraska. 



Related Areas 

Besides the National Park System three groups of 
areas exist— Affiliated Areas, the Wild and Scenic Rivers 
System, and the National Trail System— that are closely 
linked in importance and purpose to those areas man- 
aged by the National Park Service. Most are not units of 
the National Park System, yet they preserve important 
segments of the Nation's heritage. They are, therefore, 
given recognition in this section. 



Affiliated Areas 

In an Act of August 18, 1970, the National Park System 
was defined in law as "any area of land and water now or 
hereafter administered by the Secretary of the Interior 
through the National Park Service for park, monument, 
historic, parkway, recreational or other purposes." The 
same law specifically excludes "miscellaneous areas 
administered in connection therewith," that is, those 
properties that are neither Federally owned nor directly 
administered by the National Park Service but which 
utilize NPS resources. 

The Affiliated Areas comprise a variety of properties in 
the United States and Canada that preserve significant 
resources outside the National Park System. Some of 
these properties have been recognized by Acts of Con- 
gress, others have been designated national historic 
sites by the Secretary of the Interior under authority of 
the Historic Sites Act of 1935. All draw on technical or 
financial assistance from the National Park Service. 



65 



American Memorial Park 

c/o War in the Pacific 
National Historical Park 
P.O. Box 3441 
Agana, GU 96910 



Benjamin Franklin 
National Memorial 

The Franklin Institute 
20th and Benjamin 
Franklin Parkway 
Philadelphia, PA 19103 



This site on Tanapag Harbor, Saipan, in the Northern Mariana Islands, will 

be developed as a recreational park and memorial honoring those who 

died in the Marianas Campaign of World War II. LIMITED PUBLIC 

FACILITIES. 

Authorized Aug. 18, 1978. 

Acreage undetermined. 

In the Rotunda of the Franklin Institute the colossal seated statue of 
Franklin, by James Earle Fraser, honors the inventor-statesman. 
Designated Oct. 25, 1972. Owned and administered by the Institute. 
Acreage— 0.01, all Nonfederal. 



Boston African American 
National Historic Site 

Museum of Afro American History 
Dudley Station, Box 5 
Roxbury, MA 02119 



The site contains 16 pre-Civil War black history structures, including: the 
Afro American Meeting House, the oldest black church in New England; 
the Phillips School, integrated in 1855; and the Abiel Smith School. Some 
of the structures are open by appointment. LIMITED PUBLIC FACILITIES. 
Authorized Oct. 10, 1980. 
Acreage undetermined. 



Cherokee Strip Living Museum 

Curator, Cherokee Strip 
Living Museum 
Arkansas City, KS 67005 

Chicago Portage 
National Historic Site 

c/o Cook County 
Forest Preserve 
Cummings Square, 
River Forest, IL 60305 



This privately run museum near the Oklahoma border commemorates the 
opening of the "Indian Territory" to settlement. 
Authorized Oct. 12, 1976. 
Acreage— 6.00, all Nonfederal. 

A portion of the portage discovered by French explorers Jacques Mar- 
quette and Louis Joliet is preserved here. Used by pioneers as a link 
between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi, the portage was one of the 
economic foundations of Chicago. 

Designated Jan. 3, 1 952. Owned and administered by Cook County. 
Acreage— 91.20, all Nonfederal. 



Chimney Rock 
National Historic Site 

c/o Scotts Bluff 
National Monument 
P.O. Box 427 
Gering, NE 69341 



As they traveled west, pioneers camped near this famous landmark, 
which stands 500 feet above the Platte River along the Oregon Trail. 
Designated Aug. 2, 1 956. Owned by Nebraska; administered by the city of 
Bayard, the Nebraska State Historical Society, and the National Park 
Service under a cooperative agreement of June 21, 1956. 
Acreage— 83.86, all Nonfederal. 



David Berger 
National Memorial 

Jewish Community Center 
of Cleveland 
3505 Mayfield Road 
Cleveland Heights, OH 44118 



This site honors the memory of the 1 1 Israeli athletes who were assassi- 
nated at the 1 972 Olympic Games in Munich, Germany. One of these was 
David Berger, who was an American citizen. Administered by the Jewish 
Community Center of Cleveland. 
Authorized March 5, 1980. 
Acreage— 0.5, all Nonfederal. 



Ebey's Landing 

National Historical Reserve 

c/o Pacific Northwest 
Regional Office 
National Park Service 
2001 6th Ave. 
Seattle, WA 98121 



An area of central Whidbey Island encompassing the community of 
Coupeville, the reserve will protect important natural and historic values. 
LIMITED PUBLIC FACILITIES. 
Authorized Nov. 10, 1978. 
Acreage— 8,000, all Nonfederal. 



Father Marquette 
National Memorial 

Parks Division, Mich. Dept. 
of Natural Resources 
P.O. Box 30028 
Lansing, Ml 48909 



The memorial to Father Jacques Marquette, French priest and explorer, is 
to be built in Straits State Park near St. Ignace, Mich., where he founded a 
Jesuit mission in 1617 and was buried in 1678. 
Authorized Dec. 20, 1 975. 
Acreage— 52.00, all Nonfederal. 



66 



Gloria Dei (Old Swedes') 
Church National Historic Site 

Delaware Ave. and 
Christian St. 
Philadelphia, PA 19106 



This the second oldest Swedish church in the United States was founded 

in 1677. The present structure, a splendid example of early Swedish 

church architecture, was erected about 1 700. 

Designated Nov. 17, 1942. Church site owned and administered by 

Corporation of Gloria Dei (Old Swedes') Church. Boundary change: Aug. 

21, 1958. 

Acreage— 3.73 Federal: 2.08 Nonfederal: 1.65. 



Green Springs 
Historic District 

c/o Superintendent, 
Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania 
County Battlefields Memorial 
National Military Park 
P.O. Box 679 
Fredericksburg, VA 22401 



This portion of Louisa County in Virginia's Piedmont is noted for its 
concentration of fine rural manor houses and related buildings in an 
unmarred landscape. In 1973, the area was declared a Virginia historic 
landmark and also nominated to the National Register of Historic Places. 
The next year the district was declared a National Historic Landmark by 
the Secretary of the Interior. In December 1977, the Secretary agreed to 
accept preservation easements for nearly half of the 1 4,000 acres in the 
district. NO PUBLIC FACILITIES. 



Ice Age 

National Scenic Trail 

c/o Division of Tourism 
and Information 
Wisconsin Dept. of Natural 
Resources 
P.O. Box 450 
Madison, Wl 53701 



Winding through Wisconsin, the trail links together the nine units of the 
Ice Age National Scientific Reserve. Both the 1 ,000-mile hiking trail and 
the 950-mile bike route traverse Wisconsin's glacial heritage. 
Authorized Oct. 3, 1980. 



Ice Age 

National Scientific Reserve 

Division of Tourism and 
Information, Wisconsin 
Dept. of Natural Resources, 
P.O. Box 450 
Madison, Wl 53701 



This first national scientific reserve contains nationally significant features 
of continental glaciation. State parks in area are open to public. 
Authorized Oct. 13, 1964. 
Acreage— 32,500.00, all Nonfederal. 



Iditarod National Historic Trail 

c/o Alaska State Office 
National Park Service 
540 West Fifth Ave. 
Anchorage, AK 99501 



One of the Alaska Gold Rush Trails, this 2,037-mile trail extends from 
Seward to Nome and is composed of a network of trails and side trails 
developed during the gold rush era at the turn of the century. NOT 
DEVELOPED FOR PUBLIC USE. 
Authorized Nov. 1 0, 1 978. 



International Peace Garden 

P.O. Box 419 
Dunseith, ND 58637 



Peaceful relations between Canada and the United States are commemo- 
rated here. N. Dak. holds the 888-acre U.S. portion for International 
Peace Garden, Inc., which administers the area for N. Dak. and Manitoba. 
The National Park Service has assisted in the master plan. 
Originated by N. Dak. in 1931; Federal aid authorized in acts of Oct. 25, 
1949; June 28, 1954; Aug. 28, 1958; Oct. 26, 1974. 
Acreage— 2,330.30, all Nonfederal. 



Jamestown 
National Historic Site 

c/o Association for the 
Preservation of Virginia 
Antiquities, John Marshall 
House, 2705 Park Ave. 
Richmond, VA 23220 



Part of the site of the first permanent English settlement in North America 
(1607) is on the upper end of Jamestown Island, scene of the first 
representative legislative government on this continent, July 30, 1619. 
Designated Dec. 18, 1940. Owned and administered by Association for 
the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities. Remainder of Jamestown site and 
island is part of Colonial National Historical Park. 
Acreage— 20.63, all Nonfederal. 



Lewis and Clark 
National Historic Trail 

c/o Rocky Mountain 
Regional Office, 
National Park Service 
P.O. Box 25287 
Denver, CO 80225 



Designates the 3,700-mile route over land and water of the 1804-06 
expedition exploring the Louisiana Purchase from Wood River, III., to Fort 
Clatsop, Ore. NOT DEVELOPED FOR PUBLIC USE. 
Authorized Nov. 10, 1978. 



67 



McLoughlin House 
National Historic Site 

Oregon City, OR 97045 



Dr. John McLoughlin, often called the "Father of Oregon," was prominent 
in the development of the Pacific Northwest as chief factor of Fort 
Vancouver. He lived in this house from 1847 to 1857. 
Designated as McLoughlin Home National Historic Site June 27, 1941; 
name changed to McLoughlin House National Historic Site Jan. 16, 1945. 
Owned and administered by McLoughlin Memorial Association. 
Acreage— 0.63, all Nonfederal. 



Mormon Pioneer 
National Historic Trail 

c/o Rocky Mountain 
Regional Office, 
National Park Service 
P.O. Box 25287 
Denver, CO 80225 



This 1 ,300-mile trail follows the route over which Brigham Young led the 
Mormon adherents from Nauvoo, III., to the site of modern Salt Lake City, 
Utah, in 1847. NOT DEVELOPED FOR PUBLIC USE. 
Authorized Nov. 10, 1978. 



North Country 
National Scenic Trail 

c/o Midwest Regional Office 
National Park Service 
1 709 Jackson Street 
Omaha, NE 68102 



The 3,246-mile North Country Trail runs from the southern tip of New 
York's Lake Champlain to the Red River in North Dakota where it joins 
the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. 
Authorized March 5, 1980. 



Oregon National Historic Trail 

c/o Pacific Northwest 
Regional Office, 
National Park Service 
2001 6th Ave. 
Seattle, WA 98121 



The 2,000-mile trail took pioneers westward from Independence, Mo., to 
the vicinity of modern Portland, Ore., 1841-48. Among 482 historic places 
en route, many — including several segments of original trail — have poten- 
tial for visitor use development. NOT DEVELOPED FOR PUBLIC USE. 
Authorized Nov. 10, 1978. 



Overmountain Victory 
National Historic Trail 

c/o Southeast Regional Office 
National Park Service 
75 Spring Street, SW 
Atlanta, GA 30303 



This is the 272-mile path followed by a band of revolutionary patriots 
through parts of Virginia, Tennessee, and North Carolina to Kings Moun- 
tain, S.C., where they defeated the British in 1780. 
Authorized Sept. 8, 1980. 



Pennsylvania Avenue 
National Historic Site 

c/o Pennsylvania Avenue 
Development Corp. 
Suite 1148, 425 13th St., NW 
Washington, DC 20004 



This site includes a portion of Pennsylvania Avenue and the area 
adjacent to it between the Capitol and the White House encompassing 
Ford's Theatre National Historic Site, several blocks of the Washington 
commercial district, and a number of Federal structures. Existing park 
areas are listed separately. 
Designated Sept. 30, 1 965. 



Pinelands National Reserve 

c/o Mid-Atlantic Regional Office 
National Park Service 
143 S. Third St. 
Philadelphia, PA 19106 



The largest essentially undeveloped tract on the Eastern seaboard, 
exceeding one million acres, the area is noted for its massive water 
resources with myriad marshes, bogs, and ponds, and the dwarfed pines 
from which it gets its name. The reserve concept envisions close, 
cooperative preservation efforts among Federal, State, and local govern- 
ments and private property owners. LIMITED PUBLIC FACILITIES. In- 
cludes some State parks and forests. 
Authorized Nov. 10, 1978. 



Roosevelt Campobello 
International Park 

c/o Executive Secretary 
Roosevelt Campobello 
International Park Comm. 
P.O. Box 97, Lubec, ME 04652 



President Franklin D. Roosevelt was stricken here at his summer home in 
New Brunswick, Canada, at the age of 39 by poliomyelitis. This is the first 
international park to be administered by a joint commission. 
Established July 7, 1964. Owned and administered by a United States- 
Canadian Commission. 
Acreage— 2,721.50, all Nonfederal. 



68 



Saint Paul's Church This 18th-century church is significant because of its connection with 

National Historic Site events leading to the John Peter Zenger trial involving freedom of the 

897 South Columbus Ave. press, and because of its place in American architectural history and the 

Mount Vernon, NY 10550 Revolution. 

Designated July 5, 1943. Authorized Nov. 10, 1978. 

Acreage— 6.09 Federal: 4.91 Nonfederal: 1.18. 

Touro Synagogue One of the finest examples of colonial religious architecture, this syna- 

National Historic Site gogue is the present-day place of worship of Congregation Jeshuat Israel. 

85 Touro St. Designated Mar. 5, 1946. Owned by Congregation Shearith Israel, New 

Newport, Rl 02840 York City. National Park Service lends technical assistance for preserva- 

tion of the building under a cooperative agreement with the two congrega- 
tions. 
Acreage— 0.23, all Nonfederal. 



69 



Wild and Scenic Rivers System 

Public Law 90-542, of October 2, 1968, provides for 
the establishment of a system of rivers to be preserved 
as free-flowing streams accessible for public use and 
enjoyment. Components of the system, or portions of 
component rivers, may be designated as wild, scenic, or 
recreational rivers. Rivers are classified according to the 
natural qualities they possess and the evidence, as 
viewed from the river, of man's presence in the area. 
Thus, in a wild river there is little evidence of man's 
presence, the river is free of impoundments (dams) and 
generally inaccessible except by trail. A scenic river is 
one with relatively primitive shorelines, largely undevel- 
oped, but accessible in places by road. A recreational 
river has more development, is accessible by road or 
railroad, and may have been dammed. 

Once a river area is designated a component of the 
Wild and Scenic Rivers System, the objective of the 
managing agency— local, State, or Federal— is to pre- 
serve or enhance the qualities which qualified the river 
for inclusion within the system. Recreational use must be 
compatible with preservation. 

State rivers and streams may become units of the Wild 
and Scenic Rivers System when established under State 
laws and developed with river management plans ac- 
ceptable to the Secretary of the Interior. The Secretary 
may then designate the appropriate river area as a unit of 
the system. Federally managed components of the sys- 
tem are designated by Acts of Congress. Usually, Con- 
gress first requires, by law, a detailed study to determine 
the qualification of a river area for the system, then 
makes the decision based on the findings of the study. 

Important additions to the Wild and Scenic Rivers 
System were made in the Alaska National Interest Lands 
Conservation Act of December 2, 1 980. Twelve rivers lie 
wholly within units of the National Park System: Alatna, 
Aniakchak, Charley, Chilikadrotna, John, Kobuk, Mulchat- 
na, Noatak (part), North Fork of the Koyukuk, Tinayguk, 
Tlikakila, and Salmon. Alagnak Wild River is a unit of the 
National Park System. Six Alaskan wild rivers are in the 
National Wildlife Refuge System: Andreafsky, Ivishak, No- 
witna, Selawik, Sheenjek, and Wind. Portions of six rivers 
outside parks, preserves, and refuges are administered 
by the Fish and Wildlife Service: Beaver Creek, Birch 
Creek, Delta, Fortymile, Gulkana, and Unalakleet. And 
portions of twelve additional Alaskan rivers were desig- 
nated for study under the act. 

Acreages of the wild rivers within Alaska's units of the 
National Park System are not stated separately. Acre- 
ages of wild rivers within the National Wildlife Refuge 
System in Alaska and those outside both the park and 
refuge systems are yet to be determined. 



70 



Alagnak Wild River 

Katmai National Park and Preserve 

P.O. Box 7 

King Salmon, AK 99613 



See Alagnak Wild River, Alaska, a unit of the National Park System. 



Alatna Wild River 

Gates of the Arctic 
National Park and Preserve 
P.O. Box 74680 
Fairbanks, AK 99707 



The stream lies wholly within Gates of the Arctic National Park and 
Preserve, Alaska, in the Central Brooks Range. Wildlife, scenery, and 
interesting geologic features abound in the river corridor. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 83. 



Allagash Wilderness Waterway 

Bureau of Parks and Recreation 
Department of Conservation 
Augusta, ME 04333 



This major recreation resource includes the Allagash and several inter- 
connected lakes in northern Maine. 
Authorized: July 19, 1970. Mileage: 95. 
Acreage— 22,840, all Nonfederal. 



American River, North Fork 

Tahoe National Forest 

Highway 49 

Nevada City, CA 95959 



A fairly inaccessible river flowing through deeply-incised canyons, north- 
east of Sacramento, Calif., this waterway preserves spectacular Sierra 
mountain scenery. 

Authorized: Nov. 10, 1978. Mileage: 38.3. 
A creage— 13, 430. Federal: 8, 790 Nonfederal: 4, 640. 



Andreafsky River 

Fish and Wildlife Service 
1011 East Tudor Road 
Anchorage, AK 99503 



Located entirely within Yukon-Delta National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, the 

Andreafsky is the world's only known nesting area of the bristly-thighed 

curlew. 

Authorized: Dec. 2, 1 980. Mileage: 262. 



Aniakchak Wild River 

Katmai National Park and Preserve 

P.O. Box 7 

King Salmon, AK 99613 



The river, which lies within Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve, 
Alaska, flows out of Surprise Lake and plunges spectacularly through 
"The Gates." It contains areas of great geologic and scientific interest. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 69. 



Beaver Creek 

Bureau of Land Management 
555 Cordova Street 
Anchorage, AK 99501 



This Alaskan river contains no rapids and is excellent for the novice 
looking for outstanding wilderness floating. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 135. 



Birch Creek 

Bureau of Land Management 
555 Cordova Street 
Anchorage, AK 99501 

Charley Wild River 

Yukon-Charley Rivers National 
Preserve, P.O. Box 64 
Eagle, AK 99738 



At its upper and lower ends, this is one of Alaska's most popular float 
rivers. Some stretches, flowing through primitive environments, challenge 
advanced Whitewater enthusiasts. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 130. 

Lying within Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, Alaska, this stream 
is known for the exceptional clarity of its water. For the experienced 
canoer or kayaker, it offers many miles of Whitewater challenges. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 251. 



Chattooga River 

Chattahoochee National Forest 
P.O. Box 1437 
Gainesville, GA 30501 



Chilikadrotna Wild River 

Lake Clark National Park and 

Preserve, 

1011 East Tudor Road 

Anchorage, AK 99503 



Passing through a primitive setting in North Carolina, South Carolina, and 

Georgia, this is one of the few remaining free-flowing streams in the 

Southeast. 

Authorized: May 10, 1974. Mileage: 56.9. 

Acreage— 16,424 Federal: 15,621 Nonfederal: 803. 

The river lies within Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, Alaska. Long 
stretches of swift water and outstanding fishing are exceptional features. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 12. 



Clearwater River, Middle Fork 

Clearwater National Forest 
Route 4 
Orofino, ID 83544 



Part of the exploration route of Lewis and Clark, most of this river lies in 

northern Idaho's primitive wilderness. 

Authorized: Oct. 2, 1968. Mileage: 185. 

Acreage— 55,651 Federal: 49,576 Nonfederal: 6,075. 



71 



Delta River 

Bureau of Land Management 
555 Cordova Street 
Anchorage, AK 99501 

Eel River 

California Resources Agency 
1416 Ninth Street 
Sacramento, CA 95814 



The river connects a series of lakes lying in the Alaska Range and offers 
excellent floating opportunities. At Tangle Lakes Archeological District 
evidence of cultures dating back 10,000 years has been found. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 59. 

California's Eel River flows through canyons most of its length but ends in 
a gently sloping valley with virgin redwood stands. Its salmon and 
steelhead fishery is locally important. 
Authorized: Jan. 19, 1981. Mileage: 394. 



Forest Service 
630 Sansome Street 
San Francisco, CA 941 1 1 

Bureau of Land Management 
28 Cottage Way 
Sacramento, CA 95825 



Eleven Point River 

Mark Twain National Forest 
401 Fairgrounds Road 
Rolla, MO 65401 



This spring-fed stream meanders past limestone bluffs and crystal springs 

in Missouri's Ozark hills. 

Authorized: Oct. 2, 1968. Mileage: 44.4. 

Acreage— 14,195 Federal: 5,970 Nonfederal: 8,225. 



Feather River, Middle Fork 

Plumas National Forest 
P.O. Box 1500 
Quincy, CA 95971 



This generally inaccessible fishing stream in northern California features 
Feather Falls, the third highest waterfall (640 feet) in the United States. 
Authorized: Oct. 2, 1968. Mileage: 93. 
Acreage— 19,873 Federal: 16,227 Nonfederal: 3,646. 



Flathead River 

Flathead National Forest 
P.O. Box 147 
Kalispell, MT 59901 



Coursing the western boundary of Glacier National Park, Mont., this is a 

noted spawning stream. 

Authorized: Oct. 12, 1976. Mileage: 219. 

Acreage— 57,400 Federal: 46,800 Nonfederal: 10,600. 



Fortymile River 

Bureau of Land Management 
555 Cordova Street 
Anchorage, AK 99501 



The Fortymile system flows through a variety of landscapes ranging from 
muskeg marshes to alpine tundra on the flanks of Mount Fairplay. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 396. 



Gulkana River 

Bureau of Land Management 
555 Cordova Street 
Anchorage, AK 99501 



With the grandeur of Alaska's Wrangell Mountains in the distance and a 
variety of Whitewater, the Gulkana is an outstanding recreation resource. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 152. 



Ivishak River 

Fish and Wildlife Service 
1011 East Tudor Road 
Anchorage, AK 99503 



Lying in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, this wide river passes 
year-round flowing springs, ice fields, and glaciers in hanging valleys. 
Birdlife probably exceeds 1 00 species. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1 980. Mileage: 80. 



John Wild River 

Gates of the Arctic 
National Park and Preserve 
P.O. Box 74680 
Fairbanks, AK 99707 

Klamath River 

California Resources Agency 
1416 Ninth Street 
Sacramento, CA 95814 



The river flows south through the Anaktuvuk Pass of Alaska's Brooks 

Range, and its valley is an important migration route for the Arctic Caribou 

herd. Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve contains the wild 

river. 

Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 52. 

California's second largest river is a major Salmon producer, particularly 
for Coho and Chinook. On its banks are noted raptor habitats. 
Authorized: Jan. 19, 1981. Mileage: 286. 



Forest Service 

630 Sansome Street 

San Francisco, C A 941 1 1 



72 



Kobuk Wild River 
Gates of the Arctic 
National Park and Preserve 
P.O. Box 74680 
Fairbanks, AK 99707 



Kobuk Wild River is contained within Gates of the Arctic National Park 
and Preserve, Alaska. From its headwaters in the Endicott Mountains, the 
stream courses south of the Baird Mountains through a wide valley and 
passes through two scenic canyons. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 110. 



Little Beaver Creek 

Ohio Department of Natural 
Resources, Division of Natural Areas 
and Preserves, Fountain Square, 
Columbus, OH 43224 



This stream system and surrounding valley near the Pennsylvania border 
contain some of Ohio's wildest lands. 
Authorized: Oct. 23, 1975. Mileage: 33. 
Acreage— 2,637.4, all Nonfederal. 



Little Miami River 

Ohio Department of Natural 
Resources, Division of Natural Areas 
and Preserves, Fountain Square 
Columbus, OH 43224 



Flowing through a deep gorge, wooded bluffs, and rolling farmlands, this 
popular Ohio stream is easily reached from Cincinnati or Dayton. 
Authorized: Aug. 20, 1973. Mileage: 66. 
Acreage— 3,202.5, all Nonfederal. 



Lower American River 

California Resources Agency 
1416 Ninth Street 
Sacramento, CA 95814 



This short stretch of river running through Sacramento is the most heavily 
used recreation river in California. The river is also known for its runs of 
steelhead trout and salmon. 
Authorized: Jan. 19, 1981. Mileage: 23. 



Lower St. Croix Riverway 

Minnesota Department of Natural 
Resources, Centennial Office 
Building, St. Paul, MN 55155 

Wisconsin Department of 
Natural Resources 
P.O. Box 450 
Madison, Wl 53701 



The northern portion of the lower St. Croix is a unit of the National Park 

System. The southern portion, jointly administered by the states of 

Minnesota and Wisconsin, is a wide, gently flowing river which ends at the 

Mississippi River. 

Authorized: June 17, 1976. Mileage: 25. 

Acreage— 6,065, all Nonfederal. 



Middle Delaware River 

Delaware Water Gap National 
Recreation Area 
Bushkill, PA 18324 



See Delaware National Scenic River, Pennsylvania, a unit of the National 
Park System. 



Missouri River 

Bureau of Land Management 
P.O. Box 30157 
Billings, MT 59107 



A spectacular Montana valley with striking rock formations and diverse 

flora and fauna, this river corridor also includes numerous historical and 

archeological sites. 

Authorized: Oct. 12, 1976. Mileage: 149. 

Acreage— 131,838 Federal: 85,946 Nonfederal: 45,892. 



Missouri River 

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 
Omaha District 
6014 USPO & Courthouse 
215 North 17th Street 
Omaha, NE 68102 



This stretch of the "Big Muddy" from Gavins Point Dam, near Yankton, 
S.D., to Ponca, Nebr., is still semi-wild. 
Authorized: Nov. 10, 1978. Mileage: 59. 
Acreage— 1 4,941 , all Nonfederal. 



Mulchatna Wild River 

Lake Clark National Park 
and Preserve 
1011 East Tudor Road 
Anchorage, AK 99503 



Mulchatna Wild River, which lies within Lake Clark National Park and 
Preserve, Alaska, is exceptionally scenic as it flows out of Turquoise Lake 
with the glacier-clad Chigmit Mountains to the east. Both moose and 
caribou inhabit the area. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 24. 



New River, South Fork 

Stone Mountain State Park 
Star Route 1 , Box 1 7 
Roaring Gap, NC 28668 



The ancient, northward-flowing New River passes through valleys and 
bottom lands in western North Carolina. 
Authorized: April 13, 1976. Mileage: 26.5. 
Acreage— 1,900, all Nonfederal. 



73 



Noatak Wild River 

Gates of the Arctic 
National Park and Preserve 
P.O. Box 74680 
Fairbanks, AK 99707 



Noatak Wild River is situated in Gates of the Arctic National Park and 
Preserve and Noatak National Preserve in Alaska. The Noatak drains the 
largest mountain-ringed river basin in America that is still virtually unaf- 
fected by human activities. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 330. 



Kobuk Valley National Park 
General Delivery 
Kotzebue, AK 99752 



North Fork of the Koyukuk 
Wild River 
Gates of the Arctic 
National Park and Preserve 
P.O. Box 74680 
Fairbanks, AK 99707 



The river flows from the south flank of the Arctic Divide through broad, 
glacially-carved valleys beside the rugged Endicott Mountains in Alaska's 
Central Brooks Range. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 102. 



Nowitna River 

Fish and Wildlife Service 
1011 East Tudor Road 
Anchorage, AK 99503 



Flowing through the Nowitna National Wildlife Refuge, the lower portion 
of the river meanders through one of the most productive waterfowl 
nesting areas in the State. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 225. 



Obed Wild and Scenic River 

P.O. Drawer 630 
Oneida, TN 37841 



See Obed Wild and Scenic River, Tennessee, a unit of the National Park 
System. 



Pere Marquette River 

Huron-Manistee National Forest 
421 S. Mitchell Street 
Cadillac, Ml 49601 



Wandering gently through overhanging bluffs and across the grassy 
floodplains of central Michigan, this is one of the finest trout streams of 
the Midwest. 
Authorized: Nov. 10, 1978. Mileage: 66.4. 



Rapid River 

Hells Canyon 
National Recreation Area 
P.O. Box 907 
Baker, OR 97814 



A part of the Forest Service— administered by Hells Canyon National 

Recreation Area in Idaho— this river's Whitewater harbors an important 

salmon hatchery. 

Authorized: Dec. 31, 1975. Mileage: 24. 

Acreage— 8,382 Federal: 7,822 Nonfederal: 560. 



Rio Grande 

Bureau of Land Management 
P.O. Box 1449 
Sante Fe, NM 87501 



Challenging Whitewater enthusiasts, this rugged stretch of the upper Rio 
Grande roars through a deep canyon in northern New Mexico. 
Authorized: Oct. 2, 1968. Mileage: 52.75. 
Acreage— 16,880 Federal: 14,763 Nonfederal: 2,117. 



Rio Grande 

Big Bend National Park 

Big Bend National Park, TX 79834 



See Rio Grande Wild and Scenic River, Texas, a unit of the National Park 
System. 



Rogue River 

Bureau of Land Management 
P.O. Box 2965 
Portland, OR 97208 



Emerging from the western slope of Oregon's Cascade Mountains, the 

Rogue winds across farmlands and orchards before passing through 

wilderness to the Pacific Ocean. 

Authorized: Oct. 2, 1968. Mileage: 84.5. 

Acreage— 25,999 Federal: 21,657 Nonfederal: 4,342. 



St. Croix Riverway 

P.O. Box 708 

St. Croix Falls, Wl 54024 



See St. Croix National Scenic Riverway, Wisconsin, a National Park Sys- 
tem unit. 



Saint Joe River 

Idaho Panhandle National Forest 

P.O. Box 310 

Coeur d'Alene, ID 83814 



This central Idaho river offers outstanding scenery, good fishing, 

plenty of wildlife. 

Authorized: Nov. 10, 1978. Mileage: 72.8. 

Acreage— 21,803 Federal: 21,644 Nonfederal: 159. 



and 



Salmon River, Middle Fork 

Challis National Forest 
Forest Service Building 
Challis, ID 83226 



Churning through central Idaho's wilderness, this river remains as primi- 
tive as it was during the explorations of the Lewis and Clark expedition. 
Authorized: Oct. 2, 1968. Mileage: 104. 
Acreage— 32,000 Federal: 30,218 Nonfederal: 1,782. 



74 



Salmon River 

Salmon National Forest 
Forest Service Bldg. 
Salmon, ID 83467 



This is the famous "River of No Return" that flows through a wilderness 

in central Idaho bearing the same name. The river is noted for its 

Whitewater. 

Authorized: July 23, 1980. Mileage: 125. 



Salmon Wild River 

Kobuk Valley National Park 
General Delivery 
Kotzebue, AK 99752 

Selawik River 

Fish and Wildlife Service 
1011 East Tudor Road 
Anchorage, AK 99503 



Salmon Wild River, located within Kobuk Valley National Park, Alaska, is 
small but exceptionally beautiful, with deep blue-green pools and many 
rock outcroppings. Vegetation ranges from alpine tundra to treeless bogs. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 70. 

Lying entirely within the Selawik National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, this 
river is one of the major drainages of the Kobuk region of northwest 
Alaska. The river is known for its fishing and variety of wildlife. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 160. 



Sheenjek River 

Fish and Wildlife Service 
1011 East Tudor Road 
Anchorage, AK 99503 



Flowing out of Alaska's Romanzof Mountains, this river travels 205 miles 
to join the Porcupine River near its junction with the mighty Yukon. The 
protected portion lies entirely within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 160. 



Skagit River 

Mount Baker-Snoqualmie 
National Forest 
1601 Second Avenue Building 
Seattle, WA 98101 



The Skagit and its Cascade, Sauk, and Suiattle tributaries feed into Puget 

Sound in northern Washington. The area features rugged canyons, 

glacier-clad mountains, and densely forested slopes. 

Authorized: Nov. 10, 1978. Mileage: 157.5. 

Acreage— 34,650 Federal: 16,605 Nonfederal: 18,045. 



Smith River 

California Resources Agency 
1416 Ninth Street 
Sacramento, CA 95814 



The Smith, including 43 tributaries which are also protected, is the only 
major undammed river system in California. The river is shaded by 
towering redwoods and is an important stream for fish. 
Authorized: Jan. 19, 1981. Mileage: 329. 



Forest Service 

630 Sansome Street 

San Francisco, CA 941 1 1 



Snake River 

Hells Canyon 
National Recreation Area 
P.O. Box 907 
Baker, OR 97814 



Traversing Hells Canyon, the deepest gorge on the North American 
continent, the Snake is famed for Whitewater boating and fishing. 
Authorized: Dec. 31, 1975. Mileage: 66.9. 
Acreage— 1 7, 546 Federal: 15,411 Nonfederal: 2, 135 



Tinayguk Wild River 
Gates of the Arctic 
National Park and Preserve 
P.O. Box 74680 
Fairbanks, AK 99707 



Alaska's Tinayguk River is the largest tributary of the North Fork of the 
Koyukuk. Both lie entirely within the pristine environment of Gates of the 
Arctic National Park. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1 980. Mileage: 44. 



Tlikakila Wild River 

Lake Clark National 
Park and Preserve 
1011 East Tudor Road 
Anchorage, AK 99503 

Trinity River 

California Resources Agency 
1416 Ninth Street 
Sacramento, CA 95814 

Forest Service 

630 Sansome Street 

San Francisco, CA 941 1 1 



Located about 100 air miles west of Anchorage in Lake Clark National 
Park, Alaska, Tlikakila Wild River is closely flanked by glaciers, 10,000- 
foot high rock-and-snow-capped mountains, and perpendicular cliffs. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 51. 



This major tributary of California's Klamath River is located in heavily 
forested, mountainous terrain. The lower river flows through the Hoopa 
Valley Indian Reservation. 
Authorized: Jan. 19, 1981. Mileage: 203. 



Unalakleet River 

Bureau of Land Management 
555 Cordova Street 
Anchorage, AK 99501 



This Northwest Alaska river is best known for its fishing. King, chum, and 
pink salmon, grayling, and arctic char are its major fish. 
Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 66. 



75 



Upper Delaware River See Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River, Pennsylvania, a 

Delaware Water Gap National Park System unit. 
National Recreation Area 
Bushkill, PA 18324 

Wind River One of the wild and scenic rivers within the Arctic National Wildlife 

Fish and Wildlife Service Refuge, Alaska, this stream flows through a wide variety of vegetation 

1011 East Tudor Road and scenery. 

Anchorage, AK 99503 Authorized: Dec. 2, 1980. Mileage: 140. 

Wolf River Noted as one of the most scenic and rugged rivers in the Midwest, the 

Menominee Restoration Wolf flows through the Menominee reservation. 

Committee Authorized: Oct. 2, 1968. Mileage: 25. 
P.O. Box 397 
Keshena, Wl 54135 



76 



.>/***. . n -,- 



The Mariri Headlands and large portions of the San Francisco 
shoreline trial' flank the famed Golden Gate are ndw part of 
Golden Gate National Recreation Area. 







National Trail System 

A national system of trails was authorized by Public 
Law 90-543 also on October 2, 1968. Under its terms, 
national scenic trails were authorized to provide access 
to, travel within, and enjoyment and appreciation of 
open-air, outdoor areas of the Nation. A decade later, on 
November 10, 1978, the law was amended to provide 
recognition of historic trails marking routes of commerce, 
exploration, and migration in America. 

Generally, the National Scenic Trails are to be protect- 
ed by Federal, State, and local agencies in such fashion 
as to assure public recreational access to the trails and 
to preserve their natural settings and to protect them 
from commercial or residential development which would 
disrupt public use of the trails. 

The National Historic Trails are simply designated to 
recognize historically important routes. Where these 
trails cross Federal lands, the managing agency is re- 
sponsible for marking and preserving the trail routes. 
State and local agencies may choose to take an active 
management role on those parts of the trails outside of 
Federal jurisdiction. No Federal funds will be spent to 
acquire additional lands for the historic trails without 
specific approval from Congress. 



78 



Appalachian 
National Scenic Trail 

National Park Service 
Harpers Ferry, WV 25425 

Continental Divide 
National Scenic Trail 

Director, Recreation Management 
U.S. Forest Service 
P.O. Box 2417 
Washington, D.C. 20013 

Ice Age National Scenic Trail 

c/o Division of Tourism and 
Information, Wisconsin Dept. of 
Natural Resources 
P.O. Box 450 
Madison, Wl 53701 



National Park System unit. 



In close proximity to the continental divide, the trail extends from the 
Canadian border in Glacier National Park, Mont., through Idaho, Wyo- 
ming, Colorado, and New Mexico to Mexico. 
Authorized: Nov. 10, 1978. Mileage: 3,100. 
Acreage: Not available. 



See listing under Affiliated Areas. 



Iditarod National Historic Trail 

Pacific Northwest Regional Office 
National Park Service 
2001 6th Ave. 
Seattle, WA 98121 



See listing under Affiliated Areas. 



Lewis and Clark 
National Historic Trail 

Rocky Mountain Regional Office 
National Park Service 
P.O. Box 25287 
Denver, CO 80225 



See listing under Affiliated Areas. 



Mormon Pioneer 
National Historic Trail 

Rocky Mountain Regional Office 
National Park Service 
P.O. Box 25287 
Denver, CO 80225 



See listing under Affiliated Areas. 



North Country National Scenic 
Trail 

c/o Midwest Regional Office 
National Park Service 
1709 Jackson St. 
Omaha, NE 68102 



See listing under Affiliated Areas. 



Oregon National Historic Trail 

Pacific Northwest Regional Office 
National Park Service 
2001 6th Ave. 
Seattle, WA 98121 



See listing under Affiliated Areas. 



Overmountain Victory 
National Historic Trail 

c/o Southeast Regional Office 
National Park Service 
75 Spring St., SW 
Atlanta, GA 30303 



See listing under Affiliated Areas. 



Pacific Crest Trail 

Director, Recreation Management 
U.S. Forest Service 
P.O. Box 2417 
Washington, D.C. 20013 



Extending from the Mexico-California border northward along the moun- 
tain ranges of California, Oregon, and Washington, the trail reaches the 
Canadian border near Ross Lake, Wash. 
Authorized: Oct. 2, 1968. Mileage: 2,600. 
Acreage: Not available. 



79 




High sandstone cliffs along the shoreline of Pictured Rocks 
National Lakeshore in Michigan are viewed from a boat in 
Lake Superior. 






Alphabetical Listing 




Alphabetical Listing 



Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Site, Ky. 30 

(See also Ford's Theatre; Lincoln) 
Acadia National Park, Maine 31 
Adams National Historic Site, Mass. 34 
Agate Fossil Beds National Monument, Nebr. 39 
Alabama 14 

Alagnak Wild River, Alaska 12 
Alaska 14 

Alatna Wild River, Alaska 71 
Alcatraz Island, Calif. (See Golden Gate NRA) 
Alibates Flint Quarries National Monument, Tex. 53 
Allagash Wilderness Waterway, Maine 71 
Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic 

Site, Pa. 47 
American Memorial Park, Saipan 66 
American River, North Fork, Calif. 71 
Amistad National Recreation Area, Tex. 53 
Andersonville National Historic Site, Ga. 26 
Andreafsky River, Alaska 71 
Andrew Johnson National Historic Site, Tenn. 51 
Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve, 

Alaska 12 
Aniakchak Wild River, Alaska 71 
Antietam National Battlefield Site, Md. 32 
Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, Wis. 60 
Appalachian National Scenic Trail, Maine-N.H.-Vt.- 

Mass.-Conn.-N.Y.-N.J.-Pa.-Md.-W.Va.-Va.- 

Tenn.-N.C.-Ga. 31 
Appomattox Court House National Historical 

Park, Va. 56 
Arches National Park, Utah 54 
Arizona 15 
Arkansas 18 

Arkansas Post National Memorial, Ark. 18 
Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial, Va. 56 
Assateague Island National Seashore, Md.-Va. 32 
Aztec Ruins National Monument, N.Mex. 40 

B 

Badlands National Park, S.Dak. 50 
Bandelier National Monument, N.Mex. 40 
Barton, Clara (See Clara Barton NHS) 
Beaver Creek, Alaska 71 
Benjamin Franklin National Memorial, Pa. 66 

(See also Independence NHP) 
Bent's Old Fort National Historic Site, Colo. 21 
Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Alaska 12 
Big Bend National Park, Tex. 53 



82 



Big Cypress National Preserve, Fla. 25 
Big Hole National Battlefield, Mont. 38 
Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area, 

Mont.-Wyo. 38 
Big South Fork National River and Recreation 

Area, Ky.-Tenn. 51 
Big Thicket National Preserve, Tex. 53 
Birch Creek, Alaska 71 
Biscayne National Park, Fla. 28 
Black Canyon of the Gunnison National 

Monument, Colo. 21 
Blue Ridge Parkway, N.C.-Va. 44 
Booker T. Washington National Monument, Va. 56 

(See also Tuskegee Institute NHS) 
Boston African American National Historic Site, 

Mass. 66 
Boston National Historical Park, Mass. 34 
Brices Cross Roads National Battlefield Site, Miss. 36 
Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah 54 
Buck Island Reef National Monument, V.I. 58 
Buffalo National River, Ark. 18 
Bunker Hill, Mass. (See Boston NHP) 



Cabrillo National Monument, Calif. 18 

California 18 

Canaveral National Seashore, Fla. 25 

Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Ariz. 15 

Canyonlands National Park, Utah 54 

Cape Canaveral, Fla. (See Canaveral NS) 

Cape Cod National Seashore, Mass. 34 

Cape Hatteras National Seashore, N.C. 44 

Cape Henry Memorial, Va. (See Colonial NHP) 

Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Alaska 12 

Cape Lookout National Seashore, N.C. 45 

Capitol Reef National Park, Utah 54 

Capulin Mountain National Monument, N.Mex. 40 

Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site, N.C. 45 

Carlsbad Caverns National Park, N.Mex. 41 

Carver, George Washington (See George Washington 

Carver NM; Tuskegee Institute NHS) 
Casa Grande National Monument, Ariz. 15 
Castillo de San Marcos National Monument, Fla. 25 
Castle Clinton National Monument, N.Y. 42 
Catoctin Mountain Park, Md. 32 
Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah 55 
Chaco Culture National Historical Park, N.Mex. 41 
Chalmette (See Jean Lafitte NHP) 
Chamizal National Memorial, Tex. 53 
Channel Islands National Park, Calif. 18 
Charley Wild River, Alaska 71 



83 



Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area, 

Ga. 29 
Chattooga River, Ga. 71 
Cherokee Strip Living Museum; Kans. 66 
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical 

Park, Md.-D.C.-W.Va. 32 
Chicago Portage National Historic Site, III. 66 
Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military 

Park, Ga.-Tenn. 26 
Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Okla. 47 
Chilikadrotna Wild River, Alaska 71 
Chimney Rock National Historic Site, Nebr. 66 
Chiricahua National Monument, Ariz. 15 
Christiansted National Historic Site, V.I. 58 
City of Refuge (See Pu'uhonua o Honaunau NHP) 
Clara Barton National Historic Site, Md. 32 
Clark, George Rogers (See George Rogers Clark NHP) 
Clearwater River, Middle Fork, Idaho 71 
Colonial National Historical Park, Va. 56 
Colorado 21 

Colorado National Monument, Colo. 21 
Congaree Swamp National Monument, S.C. 50 
Connecticut 22 
Continental Divide National Scenic Trail, Mont.-ldaho- 

Wyo.-Colo.-N.Mex. 79 
Coronado National Memorial, Ariz. 16 
Coulee Dam National Recreation Area, Wash. 59 
Cowpens National Battlefield, S.C. 50 
Crater Lake National Park, Oreg. 47 
Craters of the Moon National Monument, Idaho 29 
Cumberland Gap National Historical 

Park, Ky.-Va.-Tenn. 31 
Cumberland Island National Seashore, Ga. 26 
Cumberland River, Ky.-Tenn. (See Big South Fork 

National River and Recreation Area) 
Curecanti National Recreation Area, Colo. 21 
Custer Battlefield National Monument, Mont. 38 
Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area, Ohio 46 



David Berger National Memorial, Ohio 66 
Death Valley National Monument, Calif.-Nev. 19 
Delaware National Scenic River, NJ.-N.Y.-Pa. 48 
Delaware Water Gap National Recreation 

Area, N.J.-Pa. 48 
Delta River, Alaska 72 
Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska 13 
De Soto National Memorial, Fla. 25 
Devils Postpile National Monument, Calif. 19 
Devils Tower National Monument, Wyo. 61 
Dinosaur National Monument, Colo.-Utah 21 



84 



District of Columbia 22 

Dorchester Heights National Historic Site 

(See Boston NHP) 
Douglass, Frederick (See Frederick Douglass Home) 



Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve, Wash. 66 

Edgar Allen Poe National Historic Site, Pa. 48 

Edison National Historic Site, N.J. 40 

Eel River, Calif. 72 

Effigy Mounds National Monument, Iowa 30 

Eisenhower National Historic Site, Pa. 48 

Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site, N.Y. 42 

Eleven Point River, Mo. 72 

Ellis Island, N.Y. (See Statue of Liberty NM) 

El Morro National Monument, N.Mex. 41 

Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site, Calif. 19 

Everglades National Park, Fla. 25 



Father Marquette National Memorial, Mich. 66 

Feather River, Middle Fork, Calif. 72 

Federal Hall National Memorial, N.Y. 42 

Fire Island National Seashore, N.Y. 42 

Flathead River, Mont. 72 

Florida 25 

Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument, Colo. 22 

Ford's Theatre National Historic Site, D.C. 23 

Fort Benton, Mont. 38 

Fort Bowie National Historic Site, Ariz. 16 

Fort Caroline National Memorial, Fla. 25 

Fort Clatsop National Memorial, Oreg. 47 

Fort Davis National Historic Site, Tex. 53 

Fort Donelson National Military Park, Tenn. 52 

Fort Frederica National Monument, Ga. 27 

Fort Jefferson National Monument, Fla. 26 

Fort Laramie National Historic Site, Wyo. 61 

Fort Larned National Historic Site, Kans. 30 

Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic 

Shrine, Md. 33 
Fort Matanzas National Monument, Fla. 26 
Fort Moultrie, S.C. (See Fort Sumter NM) 
Fort Necessity National Battlefield, Pa. 48 
Fort Pickens, Fla. (See Gulf Islands NS) 
Fort Point National Historic Site, Calif. 19 
Fort Pulaski National Monument, Ga. 27 
Fort Raleigh National Historic Site, N.C. 45 
Fort Scott National Historic Site, Kans. 30 
Fort Smith National Historic Site, Ark.-Okla. 18 
Fort Stanwix National Monument, N.Y. 42 



85 



Fort Sumter National Monument, S.C. 50 
Fort Union National Monument, N.Mex. 41 
Fort Union Trading Post National Historic 

Site, N.Dak.-Mont. 45 
Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, Wash. 59 
Fort Washington Park, Md. 33 
Fortymile River, Alaska 72 
Fossil Butte National Monument, Wyo. 61 
Franklin, Benjamin (See Benjamin Franklin NMem; 

Independence NHP) 
Frederick Douglass Home, D.C. 23 
Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site, Mass. 34 
Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania County Battlefields 

Memorial National Military Park, Va. 57 
Friendship Hill National Historic Site, Pa. 48 



Garfield, James (See James A. Garfield NHS) 
Gates of the Arctic National Park and 

Preserve, Alaska 13 
Gateway Arch, St. Louis, Mo. (See Jefferson National 

Expansion Memorial NHS) 
Gateway National Recreation Area, N.Y.-N.J. 40, 43 
General Grant Grove, Calif. (See Kings Canyon NP) 
General Grant National Memorial, N.Y. 43 
George Rogers Clark National Historical Park, Ind. 29 
George Washington Birthplace National 

Monument, Va. 57 
George Washington Carver National 

Monument, Mo. 37 
George Washington Memorial Parkway, Va.-Md. 57 

(See also Washington Monument, D.C.) 
Georgia 26 

Georgia O'Keeffe National Historic Site, N.Mex. 41 
Gettysburg National Military Park, Pa. 48 
Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument, N.Mex. 41 
Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska 13 
Glacier National Park, Mont. 38 
Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Utah-Ariz. 55 
Gloria Dei (Old Swedes') Church National Historic 

Site, Pa. 67 
Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Calif. 19 
Golden Spike National Historic Site, Utah 55 
Grand Canyon National Park, Ariz. 16 
Grand Portage National Monument, Minn. 36 
Grand Teton National Park, Wyo. 61 
Gran Quivira National Monument (See Salinas NM) 
Grant, U. S. (See General Grant NM) 
Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site, Mont. 38 
Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colo. 22 
Great Smoky Mountains National Park, N.C.-Tenn. 52 



86 



Greenbelt Park, Md. 33 

Green Springs Historic District, Va. 67 

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Tex. 53 

Guam 27 

Guilford Courthouse National Battlefield, N.C. 45 

Gulf Islands National Seashore, Fla.-Miss. 26, 36 

Gulkana River, Alaska 72 

H 

Haleakala National Park, Hawaii 28 

Hamilton, Alexander (See Hamilton Grange NMem) 

Hamilton Grange National Memorial, N.Y. 43 

Hampton National Historic Site, Md. 33 

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, Md.-W.Va. 60 

Hawaii 28 

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii 28 

Herbert Hoover National Historic Site, Iowa 30 

Hohokam Pima National Monument, Ariz. 16 

Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic 

Site, N.Y. 43 
Homestead National Monument of America, Nebr. 39 
Hoover, Herbert (See Herbert Hoover NHS) 
Hopewell Village National Historic Site, Pa. 49 
Horseshoe Bend National Military Park, Ala. 12 
Hot Springs National Park, Ark. 18 
Hovenweep National Monument, Colo.-Utah 22 
Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site, Ariz. 16 

I 

Ice Age National Scenic Trail, Wis. 67 

Ice Age National Scientific Reserve, Wis. 67 

Idaho 29 

Iditarod National Historic Trail, Alaska 67 

Illinois 29 

Independence National Historical Park, Pa. 49 

Indiana 29 

Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Ind. 29 

International Peace Garden, N.Dak. 67 

Iowa 30 

Isle Royale National Park, Mich. 35 

Ivishak River, Alaska 72 



James A. Garfield National Historic Site, Ohio 46 
Jamestown National Historic Site, Va. 67 
Jean Lafitte National Historical Park, La. 31 
Jefferson Memorial (See Thomas Jefferson Memorial) 
Jefferson National Expansion Memorial National Historic 
Site, Mo. 37 



87 



Jewel Cave National Monument, S.Dak. 51 
John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway, Wyo. 61 
John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, Oreg. 47 
John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing 

Arts, D.C. 23 
John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic 

Site, Mass. 34 
John Muir National Historic Site, Calif. 19 
John Wild River, Alaska 72 
Johnson, Andrew (See Andrew Johnson NHS) 
Johnson, L. B. (See Lyndon B. Johnson NHS) 
Johnstown Flood National Memorial, Pa. 49 
Joshua Tree National Monument, Calif. 19 

K 

Kalaupapa National Historical Park, Hawaii 28 

Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park, Hawaii 28 

Kansas 30 

Katmai National Park and Preserve, Alaska 13 

Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska 13 

Kennedy Center, D.C. (See John F. Kennedy Center) 

Kennedy, J. F. (See John F. Kennedy NHS) 

Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park, Ga. 27 

Kentucky 30 

King, Martin Luther, Jr. (See Martin Luther King, 

Jr. NHS) 
Kings Canyon National Park, Calif. 19 
Kings Mountain National Military Park, S.C. 52 
Klamath River, Calif. 72 
Klondike Gold Rush National Historical 

Park, Alaska- Wash. 14, 59 
Knife River Indian Villages National Historic 

Site, N.Dak. 45 
Kobuk Valley National Park, Alaska 14 
Kobuk Wild River, Alaska 73 
Kosciuszko, Thaddeus (See Thaddeus Kosciuszko NMem) 



Laffitte, Jean (See Jean Lafitte NHP) 

Lake Chelan National Recreation Area, Wash. 59 

Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, Alaska 14 

Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Ariz.-Nev. 39 

Lake Meredith Recreation Area, Tex. 53 

Lassen Volcanic National Park, Calif. 20 

Lava Beds National Monument, Calif. 20 

Lee, Robert E. (See Arlington House) 

Lehman Caves National Monument, Nev. 39 

Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, lll.-Mo.-Kans.- 

lowa-Nebr.-S.Dak.-N.Dak.-Mont.-ldaho-Wash.- 

Oreg. 67 



88 



Liberty Bell, Philadelphia, Pa. (See Independence NHP) 
Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial, Ind. 29 
Lincoln Home National Historic Site, III. 29 
Lincoln Memorial, D.C. 23 

(See also Abraham Lincoln; Ford's Theatre) 
Little Beaver Creek, Ohio 73 
Little Miami River, Ohio 73 
Longfellow National Historic Site, Mass. 34 
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (See Chickamauga 

and Chattanooga NMP) 
Louisiana 31 

Lowell National Historical Park, Mass. 34 
Lower American River, Calif. 73 

Lower St. Croix National Scenic Riverway, Minn. -Wis. 60 
Lower St. Croix River, Minn.-Wis. 73 
Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park, Tex. 53 
Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on 

the Potomac, D.C. 23 

M 

McLoughlin House National Historic Site, Oreg. 68 

Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site, Va. 57 

Maine 31 

Mammoth Cave National Park, Ky. 31 

Manassas National Battlefield Park, Va. 57 

Martin Luther King, Jr., National Historic Site, Ga. 27 

Martin Van Buren National Historic Site, N.Y. 43 

Maryland 32 

Massachusetts 34 

Meriwether Lewis Park, Tenn. (See Natchez Trace 

Parkway) 
Mesa Verde National Park, Colo. 22 
Michigan 35 

Middle Delaware River (See Delaware Water Gap NRA) 
Minnesota 36 

Minute Man National Historical Park, Mass. 35 
Mississippi 36 
Missouri 37 

Missouri River, Mont. 73 
Missouri River, S.Dak.-Nebr. 73 
Monocacy National Battlefield, Md. 33 
Montana 38 

Montezuma Castle National Monument, Ariz. 16 
Moores Creek National Military Park, N.C. 45 
Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail, lll.-lowa-Nebr.- 

Wyo.-Utah 68 
Morristown National Historical Park, N.J. 40 
Mound City Group National Monument, Ohio 46 
Mount McKinley National Park (See Denali NP and P) 
Mount Rainier National Park, Wash. 59 
Mount Rushmore National Memorial, S.Dak. 51 



89 



Mount Whitney, Calif. (See Sequoia National Park) 
Muir Woods National Monument, Calif. 20 

(See also John Muir) 
Mulchatna Wild River, Alaska 73 

N 

Natchez Trace Parkway, Miss.-Tenn.-Ala. 36 

National Capital Parks, D.C.-Md. 23 

National Mall, D.C. 24 

Natural Bridges National Monument, Utah 55 

Navajo National Monument, Ariz. 16 

Nebraska 39 

Nevada 39 

New Hampshire 39 

New Jersey 40 

New Mexico 40 

New Orleans, Battle of (See Jean Lafitte NHP) 

New River Gorge National River, W.Va. 60 

New River, South Fork, N.C. 73 

New York 42 

Nez Perce National Historical Park, Idaho 29 

Ninety Six National Historic Site, S.C. 50 

Noatak National Preserve, Alaska 14 

Noatak Wild River, Alaska 74 

North Carolina 44 

North Cascades National Park, Wash. 59 

North Country National Scenic Trail, N.Y.-Pa.-Ohio-Mich. 

Wis.-Minn.-N.Dak. 68 
North Dakota 45 

North Fork of the Koyukuk Wild River, Alaska 74 
Nowitna River, Alaska 74 



Obed Wild and Scenic River, Tenn. 52 

Ocmulgee National Monument, Ga. 27 

Ohio 46 

O'Keeffe, Georgia (See Georgia O'Keeffe NHS) 

Oklahoma 47 

Olmsted, Frederick (See Frederick L. Olmsted NHS) 

Olympic National Park, Wash. 59 

O'Neill, Eugene (See Eugene O'Neill NHS) 

Oregon 47 

Oregon Caves National Monument, Oreg. 47 

Oregon National Historic Trail, Kans.-Nebr.-Wyo.-ldaho- 

Oreg.-Wash. 68 
Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ariz. 17 
Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail, 

Va.-Tenn.-N.C. 68 
Ozark National Scenic Riverways, Mo. 37 



90 



Pacific Crest Trail, Calif.-Oreg.-Wash. 79 

Padre Island National Seashore, Tex. 54 

Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site, Tex. 54 

Paul Revere House, Mass. (See Boston NHP) 

Pea Ridge National Military Park, Ark. 18 

Pecos National Monument, N.Mex. 41 

Pennsylvania 47 

Pennsylvania Avenue National Historic Site, D.C. 68 

Pere Marquette River, Mich. 74 

Perry's Victory and International Peace 

Memorial, Ohio 46 
Petersburg National Battlefield, Va. 57 
Petrified Forest National Park, Ariz 17 
Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, Mich. 35 
Pinelands National Reserve, N.J. 68 
Pinnacles National Monument, Calif. 20 
Pipe Spring National Monument, Ariz. 17 
Pipestone National Monument, Minn. 36 
Piscataway Park, Md. 33 
Point Reyes National Seashore, Calif. 20 
Prince William Forest Park, Va. 58 
Puerto Rico 49 

Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park, Hawaii 28 
Puukohola Heiau National Historic Site, Hawaii 28 



Rainbow Bridge National Monument, Utah 55 

Rapid River, Oreg. 74 

Redwood National Park, Calif. 20 

Revere, Paul (See Boston NHP) 

Rhode Island 50 

Richmond National Battlefield Park, Va. 58 

Rio Grande, N.Mex. 74 

Rio Grande Wild and Scenic River, Tex. 54 

Robert E. Lee Memorial (See Arlington House) 

Rock Creek Park, D.C. 24 

Rockefeller, John D., Jr. (See John D. Rockefeller, Jr. 

Parkway) 
Rocky Mountain National Park, Colo. 22 
Roger Williams National Memorial, R.I. 50 
Rogue River, Oreg. 74 
Roosevelt Campobello International Park, 

N.B., Canada 68 
Roosevelt, Eleanor (See Eleanor Roosevelt NHS) 
Roosevelt, Franklin D. (See Home of Franklin D. 

Roosevelt NHS; Roosevelt Campobello) 
Roosevelt, Theodore (See Sagamore Hill NHS; 

Theodore Roosevelt) 
Ross Lake National Recreation Area, Wash. 59 
Russell Cave National Monument, Ala. 12 



91 



s 

Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, N.Y. 43 

Saguaro National Monument, Ariz. 17 

Saint Croix Island National Monument, Maine 32 

St. Croix National Scenic Riverway, Wis.-Minn. 60 

Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site, N.H. 39 

Saint Joe River, Idaho 74 

Saint Paul's Church National Historic Site, N.Y. 69 

Salem Maritime National Historic Site, Mass. 35 

Salinas National Monument, N.Mex. 41 

Salmon River, Middle Fork, Idaho 74 

Salmon River, Idaho 75 

Salmon Wild River, Idaho 75 

San Antonio Missions National Historical Park, Tex. 54 

Sandburg, Carl (See Carl Sandburg NHS) 

Sandy Hook, N.J. (See Gateway NRA) 

San Juan Island National Historical Park, Wash. 59 

San Juan National Historic Site, P.R. 49 

Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, 

Calif. 20 
Saratoga National Historical Park, N.Y. 43 
Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site, Mass. 35 
Scotts Bluff National Monument, Nebr. 39 
Selawik River, Alaska 75 
Sequoia National Park, Calif. 20 
Sewall-Belmont House National Historic Site, D.C. 24 
Sheenjek River, Alaska 75 
Shenandoah National Park, Va. 58 
Shiloh National Military Park, Tenn. 52 
Sitka National Historical Park, Alaska 14 
Skagit River, Wash. 75 
Skyline Drive, Va. (See Shenandoah NP) 
Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Mich. 35 
Smith River, Calif. 75 
Snake River, Oreg. 75 
South Carolina 50 
South Dakota 50 

Springfield Armory National Historic Site, Mass. 35 
Statue of Liberty National Monument, N.Y.-N.J. 43 
Stones River National Battlefield, Tenn. 52 
Sunset Crater National Monument, Ariz. 17 



Taft, W. H. (See William Howard Taft NHS) 

Tennessee 51 

Texas 53 

Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial, Pa. 49 

Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace National Historic 

Site, N.Y. 44 
Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural National Historic 

Site, N.Y. 44 



92 



Theodore Roosevelt Island, D.C 24 
Theodore Roosevelt National Park, N.Dak. 46 

(See also Sagamore Hill NHS) 
Thomas Jefferson Memorial, D.C. 24 
Thomas Stone National Historic Site, Md. 33 
Timpanogos Cave National Monument, Utah 55 
Tinayguk Wild River, Alaska 75 
Tlikakila Wild River, Alaska 75 
Tonto National Monument, Ariz. 17 
Touro Synagogue National Historic Site, R.I. 69 
Trinity River, Calif. 75 
Tumacacori National Monument, Ariz. 17 
Tupelo National Battlefield, Miss. 37 
Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site, Ala. 12 
Tuzigoot National Monument, Ariz. 17 

u 

Unalakleet River, Alaska 75 

Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational 

River, N.Y.-Pa. 49 
USS Arizona Memorial, Hawaii 28 
Utah 54 



Valley Forge National Historical Park, Pa. 49 

Van Buren, Martin (See Martin Van Buren NHS) 

Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site, N.Y. 44 

Vermont 56 

Vicksburg National Military Park, Miss. 37 

Virginia 56 

Virgin Islands 58 

Virgin Islands National Park, V.I. 58 

Voyageurs National Park, Minn. 36 

w 

Walnut Canyon National Monument, Ariz. 17 

War in the Pacific National Historical Park, Guam 27 

Washington 61 

Washington, Booker T. (See Booker T. Washington 

MN; Tuskegee Institute NHS) 
Washington Monument, D.C. 24 

(See also George Washington) 
Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park (See 

Glacier NP) 
West Virginia 60 
Whiskeytown-Shasta-Trinity National Recreation 

Area, Calif. 21 
White House, D.C. 24 
White Sands National Monument, N.Mex. 42 



93 



Whitman Mission National Histo/ic Site, Wash. 60 

William Howard Taft National Historic Site, Ohio 46 

Williams, Roger (See Roger Williams NMem) 

Wilson's Creek National Battlefield, Mo. 37 

Wind Cave National Park, S.Dak. 51 

Wind River, Alaska 76 

Wisconsin 60 

Wolf River, Wis. 76 

Wolf Trap Farm Park for the Performing Arts, Va. 58 

Women's Rights National Historical Park, N.Y. 44 

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, 

Alaska 15 
Wright Brothers National Memorial, N.C. 47 
Wupatki National Monument, Ariz. 17 
Wyoming 61 



Yellowstone National Park, Wyo.-Mont.-ldaho 61 
Yorktown Battlefield, Va. (See Colonial NHP) 
Yosemite National Park, Calif. 21 
Yucca House National Monument, Colo. 22 
Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, Alaska 15 



Z 

Zion National Park, Utah 55 



94 









The Grand Canyon's North Rim is about 1,000 feet higher than 
its companion to the south. The higher elevation produces a 
dramatically different climate with winters often seeing 10 feet 
of snow on the ground. The North Rim is more difficult to 
get to, but a visit here and to the South Rim, too, will give you a 
full and complete picture of the grandeur of this national park. 




:*!£ 






■ 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents. U.S. Government Printing Office. Washington. DC 20402. 

£- U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1982-374-889 GPO: 1982-374-889 

National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior 



As the Nation's principal conservation agency, the 
Department of the Interior has responsibility for most 
of our nationally owned public lands and natural 
resources. This includes fostering the wisest use of 
our land and water resources, protecting our fish and 
wildlife, preserving the environmental and cultural 
values of our national parks and historical places, and 
providing for the enjoyment of life through outdoor 
recreation. The Department assesses our energy and 
mineral resources and works to assure that their 
development is in the best interest of all our people. 
The Department also has a major responsibility for 
American Indian reservation communities and for 
people who live in island territories under U.S. 
administration. 



Index 



1982 



National Park System and Related Areas